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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

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FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 





MEMORIAL HALL 
LIBRARY 

Andover, Massachusetts 
475-6960 



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Andover v--s 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreporto19701975ando 







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Annual Report of the Town of Andover for the 1970 Fiscal Year 

Prepared by the Town Manager 

Pursuant to the Provisions of Chapter 40, Section 49 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and Article II, Section 4 of the By-Laws of the Town of Andover. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



General Government 5 

Public Safety 21 

Public Works 44 

i Public Health 34 

■ Veterans' Services 33 

Schools 28 



Library 



40 



Recreation 37 

Water 48 

Spring Grove Cemetery 50 

Andover Housing Authority 26 

Town Meeting Minutes 57 

Jury List 53 

Financial Statements 92 

Directory of Town Officials 128 






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VETERAN OF WORLD WAR II 

ANDOVER POLICE OFFICER 1947 - 1970 

ANDOVER SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1954 - 1960 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 1955 - 1960 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 
01810 



February 23, 1971 



■$(*->* 



Town Hall 
20 Main Street 



TO THE CITIZENS OF ANDOVER: 

Time has a way of marching on. This year, on May 6th, the Town of Andover will be 
celebrating the 325th Anniversary of its incorporation. When you look at this 
strictly from the viewpoint of age, it is not exactly a notable achievement 
because the passage of time itself is something over which we have no control - 
the same amount of hours is given to each living creature each day. What really 
counts is what is done with those hours, days, months and years; and from that 
viewpoint I believe Andover can claim a notable achievement. 

Time has a way of changing things. What do you think would happen if by some 
strange power we were able to place in our midst some of the early settlers and 
Indians of 1646? What do you think would be their reaction as they see 23,000 
inhabitants of Andover instead of about 600, or when they see their favorite 
streams so polluted that even the fish have difficulty surviving, or when they 
first take a deep breath of what we now call fresh air, or when they try to criss- 
cross Main Street on a busy Saturday afternoon, or try to cross Interstate 93 to 
get to their favorite hunting areas? It is only conjecture, but I have a feeling 
many of them would thank us for the brief inspection trip and then dive back into 
the comparative safety of their primitive settlements. On the other hand, if we 
of today were transplanted back into their environment of 1646 and expected to 
adapt to their way of living, our reaction would be as swift and decisive. 

Which all goes to say that to each generation is given the privilege and responsi- 
bility of creating and maintaining the kind of environment which they consider 
desirable for their times. For as long as many of us can remember, Andover has 
been known as a first-class residential community, a good place in which to live, 
to work and raise a family. May this always be our goal, regardless of what other 
changes may be necessary to adjust to the educational, scientific and moralistic 
revolutions that are a part of our present generation. 

It is quite proper that you should look to your elected and appointed officials 
for leadership in planning for the future, but they would be the first to acknow- 
ledge that they cannot do the entire job along. We urge every citizen to take an 
increasingly active part in Town affairs with the object of making a contribution 
for good. There is plenty of work for all to do, and no one need sit idly by, or 
on the mourner's bench or in the seat of the scornful. 

As we look forward with great expectations to 1971 and beyond, perhaps it would be 
well to paraphrase the pledge of allegiance to the flag, and pledge ourselves 
that working together we will make Andover: 

"One community, under God, dedicated to freedom and^ustice for all." 

BOAREKOF SELECTMEN 



RAW:rh 




Waiters, Chairman 



INDEX 



Animal Inspection 13 

Assessors 10 

AVIS 18 

Board of Appeals 15 

Board of Health 34 

Building Inspection 24 

Civil Defense 36 

Conservation Commission 17 

Council on Aging 20 

Development and Industrial 

Commission 19 

Directory of Town Officials 128 

Dog Officer 25 

Electrical Inspection 21 

Engineering 46 

Financial Statements 92 

Fire Department 22 

Forestry 45 

Game Warden 27 

Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 

Technical High School 30 

Greater Lawrence Sanitary 

District Commission 15 

Highways 47 



Housing Authority 26 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund .... 51 

Jury List 53 

Library 40 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 51 

Municipal Buildings 13 

Parks 44 

Planning Board 14 

Police Department 21 

Recreation 37 

Schools (Andover) 28 

Selectmen 5 

Sewers 50 

Spring Grove Cemetery 50 

Town Clerk 6 

Town Collector 7 

Town Counsel 9 

Town Meeting Minutes 57 

Town Treasurer 9 

Trustees Punchard Free School .... 52 

Veterans' Services 33 

Water 48 

Weights and Measures 36 



Board of Selectmen 



The Board of Selectmen met regularly twenty-four times during 1970 and had 
eleven special meetings. In addition, the Board held numerous conferences with 
Town boards, committees, and officials, attended state and regional meetings and 
made numerous inspection trips to various sections of the community in response to 
complaints . 

Robert A. Watters was reelected Chairman in March, 1970, and Roger W. Collins 
and William Stewart were reelected Vice-Chairman and Secretary , respectively. 
Sidney P. White continued as a member, and George E. Heseltine began a three-year 
term as a member of the Board . 

Following is a list of some major decisions and actions taken by the Board of 
Selectmen during 1970: 

Approved application to State Department of Public Works for the construc- 
tion of a sidewalk on the east side of North Main Street from the river to 
Shawsheen Square. 

Authorized the Town Manager to execute and file on behalf of the Town of 
Andover an application with the Department of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment, United States Government, for a grant to aid in financing the con- 
struction of a water treatment plant complete with all necessary appurte- 
nances at Haggetts Pond . 

Approved recommendation of Town Manager that Planning Board be requested 
to proceed with a planning program for the Central Business District. 

Approved Town Manager's proceeding with traffic engineering study of Cen- 
tral Business District and making application for Federal funds through the 
Highway Safety Act of 1966, this study to include the entire length of 
Main Street from Salem Street to Kenilworth Street . 

Voted present policy of having Fire Department ambulance handle only em- 
ergency cases should be continued with the Town Manager being given the 
authority to approve any questionable case. 

Voted to take by right of eminent domain two parcels of land of Owan j i 
Realty Trust, W. Rodney Hill and John Dana Hill, Trustees. 

Voted to retain tract of land known as Lots 10 and 10A on Burtt Road 
which run down to the banks of the Shawsheen River. 

Voted to take land of Harry Axelrod and John M. & Elizabeth W. Forbes 
for future school purposes. 

Voted sale and award of $485,000 Various Purpose Bonds to the First 
National Bank of Boston at the rate of 5.70 per cent on July 10, 1970. 

Voted unanimously to allow the use of the Fire Station on Park Street 
as a Youth Center until the opening of school. 

Selectman White appointed to serve as Chairman of 325th Anniversary 
Committee . 

Perambulation of the bounds conducted under auspices of Andover Board 
of Selectmen. 

Unanimously voted to deny issuance of Innholder's License to Varsity 
Inn . 



Took by eminent domain property of Anna White and/or Cottage Farm, Inc. 
of Andover off South Main Street for school purposes. 

Authorized Town Counsel to bring suit against Northeast Sand & Gravel 
in connection with their operation off Central Street bounded by Abbot. 

Voted to amend the rules and regulations governing the eligibility for 
group insurance so that all insurance coverages authorized by Chapter 
32B be considered as separable by any employee, retired employee, or 
deferred employee who applies for any part of such program. 

Approved appointment of Ambulance Study Committee. 

Approved recommendation of Manager that litigation be initiated to pre- 
vent the use of the property formerly known as The Parker House Inn on 
North Main Street as a dormitory . 

Voted to take by right of eminent domain land owned by C. Lincoln 
Giles in Ballardvale for gravel pit purposes. 

Voted to take by right of eminent domain land of 1700 Estates Trust 
located at the intersection of River Street and Andover Street, Bal- 
lardvale . 

Voted NO HUNTING ALLOWED ON TOWN OWNED PROPERTY. 

Voted to adopt in principle proposals of Director McQuade regarding use 
of sodium chloride on town roads. 

Endorsed establishment of Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee. 

Voted to hold March, 1971, Annual Town Meeting on Monday evening rather 
than on all day Saturday. 

Voted to insert article in warrant for March, 1971, Town Meeting to 
give townspeople an opportunity to approve or disapprove the substitu- 
tion of an addition to the present Town Hall rather than an entirely 
new structure . 

Voted to review charges being made at present time for various licenses. 

Moved to demolish Fire Station on Park Street as soon as possible after 
November 1, 1970. 

Went on record as strongly supporting Drop In Center Concept. 

Approved renewal of innholder's licenses, restaurant licenses, retail 
package store licenses, club and common victualler's licenses. 



Town Clerk 



The year 1970 saw the retirement of Irving 0. Piper as Town Clerk after 
serving the Town diligently in that capacity for a period of ten years. 

One of Mr. Piper's favorite projects was one that has proven invaluable to the 
Town. This was the setting up of a data processing card system whereby an active 
IBM card file is kept on all voter age residents in the Town. This file provides 
the basis for the Town's street list and voting list each year is is a source of 
ready information and quick reference. Mr. Piper gained much of his data processing 
experience while serving as paymaster for the American Woolen Company. 

In 1968 electronic voting was introduced in the Town, and Mr. Piper was highly 
instrumental in bringing about this new concept of voting. 



It was his hope that the Town would eventually develop its own centralized 
computer station so that all departments might have the benefit of keypunching and 
computerized equipment. If this is a possibility in the future due to an ever- 
increasing population and work load in municipal government, then Mr. Piper will 
have been a pioneer in the development of this technique in conjunction with our 
local government . 

The total number of registered voters in Andover as of October 3, 1970, was 
11,653, by precincts as follows: 

1 — 2,193 4 — 2,745 

2 — 1,165 5 — 994 

3 — 1,945 6 — 2,611 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Number of births recorded 300 

Males 152 
Females 148 

Number of marriages recorded 267 

Number of deaths recorded 185 

Males 71 
Females 114 

2,102 dogs were licensed and $4,797.00 collected. Of this amount, $526.25 was 
turned over to the Town Treasurer for fees. 

1,001 Hunting and Fishing Licenses were issued and $4,965.75 was collected. Of 
this amount, $233.25 was turned over to the Town Treasurer for fees. 

Other fees collected were as follows: 

Marriage Intentions $ 566.00 

Certified copies of vital 786.50 

statistics prepared 
Uniform Commercial Codes recorded 1,728.00 

Alcoholic Beverage Licenses 9,115.00 

Business Certificates 41.00 

Miscellaneous 2,269.02 

Total fees collected — $15,265.02 

The Board of Registrars held twenty-four sessions during the year for the pur- 
pose of registering new voters, checking signatures on nomination papers, private 
warrant articles and one petition. The 1970 voting list was also checked. 



Town Collector 



On April 27, 1970, the Tax Collector assumed the title of Town Collector and 
with this the responsibility for collection of all of the Town's accounts receivable 
This means that, in addition to the collection of taxes, the Town Collector is re- 
sponsible for collection of all the water bills. Although for some years the pay- 
ments for water bills were being received in the Tax Collector's office, the Water 
Superintendent was responsible for their collection. 

Since assuming office in 1966, the total collections in the Tax Collector's 
office have more than doubled, from $4,311,035.98 in 1966 to $9,759,989.00 in 1970. 
The major increase was in the Real Estate collections of $8,345,141.02 for 1970 and 
$3,394,046.99 for 1966. 





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Town Treasurer 



General Balance January 1, 1970 $ 4,115,844.98 

Receipts including loans and bond issue 16, 777 ,446 . 83 

$20,893,291.81 

Disbursements including repayment of 

tax anticipation loans 17 , 358, 503 . 11 

Balance December 31, 1970 $ 3,534,788.70 

Interest on investment of surplus funds $ 108,398.92 

Loans in anticipation of 1970 bond is- 
sues (Public Safety Center, Sewer, 
Water, Land Acquisition) $ 555,000.00 

Loans in anticipation of revenue $ 2,300,000.00 

Eleven Tax Titles were redeemed . 

An auction of land of low value was held in December. Four parcels were sold 
and ten acquired for the Town as tax possessions. 

A sale of bonds was held on July 7, 1970, covering: $205,000 - Sewer; 
$170,000 - Water; $110,000 - Public Safety Center. These were sold to the First 
National Bank of Boston, with an interest rate of 5.70, the last principal payment 
on each being due July 15, 1980. 

Town Counsel 

At the beginning of 1970, thirty-nine cases were pending as follows: 

Appellate Tax Board 20 

Zoning 2 

Public Liability 2 

Eminent Domain 7 

Contract 4 

Other 4 

During the course of the year, thirty-six new cases arose as follows: 

Appellate Tax Board 23 

Contract 5 

Eminent Domain 5 

Other 3 

In 1970, thirty cases were terminated. 

During the year there were thirty-nine appearances before courts and admin- 
istrative boards. 

Written legal opinions were rendered on forty-seven subjects; and oral opinions 
were given to, and conferences were held with, almost every department in Town. 

Fifty-five parcels of land were taken by eminent domain. Other legal matters 
included review of contracts, drafting of agreements, releases, and deeds. 

Town Counsel would like to acknowledge the benefit he has received from con- 
ferences with Arnold Salisbury, Esquire, and the late James Kane, Esquire, Town 
Counsel of North Andover and City Solicitor of Lawrence, Respectively. 

9 



Assessors 



The 1970 real estate assessed value of $188,499,500 indicates an increase of 
$12,943,500 over the previous year and a total increase of $79,683,200 since 1966. 
Included in this increase figure is the result of the equalization program conducted 
in 1967 which resulted in an increase of $49,374,000. 

The total assessed value of all taxable personal property in 1970 was 
$7,829,100, an increase of $649,000 over the previous year and an increase of 
$2,506,200 during the past five year period. 

COMPARATIVE ASSESSING DATA 



SUMMARY REPORT 



1966 



1970 



Number of Accounts Assessed 
Valuation - Personal Property 
Valuation - Real Estate 
Total Valuation 
Tax Rate Per $1,000 Valuation 
Number of Dwellings Assessed 



Clause 41 (Elderly) 
Clause 22 (Veterans) 
Clause 37 (Blind) 



Property of United States 

Property of Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Property of Literary Organizations 

Property of Charitable Organizations 

Property of Benevolent Organizations 

House of Religious Worship 

Parsonages 

Cemeteries 

Andover Housing Authority 

Property Put to a Public Use 

Property of a District 

Number of Acres Exempt 

Number of Accounts Exempt 





7,538 




8,067 


$ 


5,322,900 


$ 


7,829,100 


$ 


108,883,600 


$ 


188,566,800 


$ 


114,206,500 


$ 


196,395,900 




$33.00 




$46.00 


ID A 


5,116 

vmnn 




5,809 


■riB 

$ 


.JNlrjJJ 

16,821.09 


$ 


47,571.00 


$ 


18,044.40 


$ 


32,961.35 


$ 
ipi 


693.00 
'IONS 


$ 


3,500.00 


$ 


211,450.00 


$ 


1,881,700.00 


$ 


339,300.00 


$ 


531,800.00 


$ 


25,267,725.00 


$ 


27,281,400.00 


$ 


73,725.00 


$ 


72,100.00 


$ 


244,375.00 


$ 


472,500.00 


$ 


1,902,225.00 


$ 


2,586,200.00 


$ 


195,000.00 


$ 


259,000.00 


$ 


218,275.00 


$ 


300,400.00 


$ 


906,250.00 


$ 


1,514,900.00 


$ 


7,632,100.00 


$ 


16,203,100.00 






$ 


2,307,900.00 




2,962.74 




3,629.07 




792 




736 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE 



Number of Vehicles Assessed 

Assessed Valuation 

Excise 

Abatements 

Tax Rate Per $1,000 Valuation 

1970 Assessed Value - 
1969 Assessed Value - 



Real Estate 
Real Estate 

Increase 



$ 
$ 
$ 


10,737 
8,643,085.00 
549,775.47 
51,980.90 
$66.00 

$188,499,500 
175,556,000 


$ 

$ 
$ 

.00 
,00 


13 


15,009 
,922,223.00 
788,991.31 
51,996.95 
$66.00 



$ 12,943,500.00 



1970 Assessed Value 
1969 Assessed Value 



Personal Property 
Personal Property 

Increase 



7,829,100.00 
7,179,700.00 

649,400.00 



10 



RECAPITULATION SHEET 

Computations for Determining 1970 Tax Rate and Comparison with 1969 

APPROPRIATIONS 
1970 1969 

$ 11,186,458.91 $ 9,768,506.25 Appropriations approved at Annual Town Meeting 

56,500.00 6,500.00 Voted from available funds at Annual Town Meeting 
145,848.47 10,002.00 Voted from available funds at Special Town Meet- 
ings previous year 

$ 11,388,807.38 $ 9,785,008.25 TOTAL AMOUNT APPROPRIATED 

313.50 — Overlay Deficit 1966 
13,201.29 — Overlay Deficit 1969 

STATE AND COUNTY TAX ASSESSMENTS 

$ 248,758.68 $ 204,451.93 County Tax 

33,795.41 32,250.63 State Recreation Areas 

6,532.31 -- State Audit of Municipal Accounts 

164.45 1,191.71 State Examination of Retirement System 

1,624.00 1,237.10 Health Insurance - State Elderly Governmental 

Retiree Program 

2,166.30 2,165.55 Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 

2,259.71 — Ipswich River Watershed District 

3,545.75 — Underestimates - County Tax 

657.76 2,432.41 " - State Recreation 

243,823.58 104,107.66 OVERLAY 



543,327.95 $ 347,836.99 GROSS AMOUNT NEEDED FROM ALL AVAILABLE SOURCES 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

1,585,884.39 $ 1,378,808.96 Estimated Receipts Certified by Commissioner 

527,000.00 569,242.05 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

14,000.00 13,600.00 Licenses 

2,000.00 3,900.00 Fines 

30,000.00 30,000.00 Special Assessments 

6,000.00 5,500.00 General Government 

40,000.00 30,000.00 Protection of Persons and Property 

2,500.00 2,000.00 Health and Sanitation 

4,000.00 3,000.00 Highways 

17,000.00 10,000.00 School (Local Receipts of School Committee) 

2,000.00 4,000.00 Libraries (Local Receipts Other Than State Aid) 

220,000.00 200,000.00 Public Service Enterprises (Such as Water Dept . ) 

6,000.00 6,000.00 Cemeteries (Other Than Trust Funds and Sale of Lots) 

50,000.00 107,000.00 Interest 

500.00 500.00 Farm Animal, Machinery and Equipment Excise 

1,500.00 1,500.00 Andover Housing Authority 

2,508,384.39 $ 2,365,051.01 TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

OVERESTIMATES PREVIOUS YEAR 

$ 890.39 County Tax 

AMOUNTS VOTED TO BE TAKEN FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 

101,500.00 $ 6,500.00 Voted Regular Town Meeting 

145,848.77 100,020.00 Voted Special Town Meeting Previous Year 

380,000.00 550,800.00 Voted Regular Town Meeting to Reduce Tax Rate 

627,348.77 $ 657,320.00 TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 

11 



1970 



NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION ON PROPERTY 
1969 



9,031,115.60 $ 7,126,692.30 



VALUATION 



$ 7,829,100.00 $ 7,179,700.00 Valuation of Personal Property 
188,499,500.00 175,556,000.00 Valuation of Real Estate 

$196,328,600.00 $182,735,700.00 TOTAL 

TAX RATE 



26.34 
19.66 



23.80 School Rate 
15.20 General 



46.00 $ 



39.00 TOTAL TAX RATE 
TOTAL TAXES LEVIED 



$ 360,138.60 $ 280,008.30 Personal Property 
8,670,977.00 6,846,684.00 Real Estate 

$ 9,031,115.60 $ 7,126,692.30 TOTAL TAXES LEVIED ON PROPERTY 



$ 20,070.57 $ 
$ 1,948.29 $ 
$ 15,217.64 $ 



18,105.44 Sewer Betterments Added to Taxes 
3,022.07 Water Betterments Added to Taxes 
16,577.55 Water Liens Added to Taxes 



TEN TOP TAXPAYERS - 1970 
PERSONAL PROPERTY 
ASSESSED TAX 



Gillette Company 
Raytheon Company 
Massachusetts Electric Co. 
Phillips Academy 
Sebago-Andover Realty Trust 
Melrand Trust (Washington Park) 
Colangelo, A. J. Co., Inc. 

(Colonial Drive) 
Lawrence Gas Company 
Rolling Green Motor Inn 
Frene, John S. & Carol 

(Andover Terrace) 



$3,489,400 $160,512.40 
38,400 1,766.40 



REAL ESTATE 

ASSESSED TAX 

$6,961,000 $320,206.00 
5,482,400 252,190.40 



40,000 

50,000 

1,443,500 

40,000 

20,000 



1,840.00 

2,300.00 

66,401.00 

184.00 

920.00 



VALUATION BREAKDOWN BY CLASS 
1969 



Number 



Total 
Valuation 



Percent of 
Total 



Number 



82,400 
2,715,100 
2,034,200 
1,776,400 

1,592,600 

1,375,000 

1,259,100 

1970 

Total 
Valuation 



3,790.40 

124,894.60 

93,573.20 

81,714.40 

73,259.60 

63,250.00 

57,918.60 



Percent of 
Total 



Commercial 183 $ 20,301,100 12 

Industrial 60 15,852,100 9 

Residential 7,810 139,402,800 79 

Total 8,053 $175,556,000 100 



181 $ 22,349,300 

63 22,584,000 

7,816 143,566,200 

8,060 $188,499,500 



12 

12 

76 

100 



12 



Municipal Buildings 



WEST SCHOOL ADDITION BUILDING COMMITTEE 



On October 7, 1968, the voters at a Special Town Meeting appropriated the sum 
of $2,330,000 for building and equipping a structure which would have a pupil cap- 
acity of 595, a floor area of 65,578 square feet, and located on a site of 17 acres, 
more or less. The plans had been developed from educational specifications approved 
by the School Committee. There are twenty-four classrooms in the open concept de- 
sign, administration and health areas, learning laboratory, special education and 
instruction materials center, two-station gymnasium, 371 seat auditorium (dividable), 
and cafeteria. 

The structural system is described as concrete and steel with masonry exterior 
walls, steel deck and concrete roof construction. The floors are concrete covered 
with carpet in some areas and with resilient tile elsewhere. 

The building was accepted as substantially completed and occupied on September 
9, 1970. 

PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER 

A total of $863,000 was appropriated at the Town Meeting of March, 1967, and 
the Special Town Meeting of August, 1969, for constructing and originally equipping 
and furnishing a Public Safety Center. 

The building has been erected on North Main Street. It provides, in addition 
to new fire and police headquarters, a large area for use by Civil Defense. The 
Police Department moved into its new quarters on July 6, 1970, and the Fire Depart- 
ment moved in on August 10, 1970. 

With the completion of the building and final payment to the contractor, the 
committee was discharged. At this time there is a balance of $2,661.43 left in the 
appropr iat ion . 

OLD FIRE STATION 

The construction of the old Fire Station on Park Street was authorized at a 
Town Meeting in 1882, and the building was constructed during that year. 

In November of 1970, on orders of the Board of Selectmen, the old building was 
demolished, the basement filled in, and the area paved for additional parking space. 
A large maple tree which had been standing beside the building for many years was 
saved. The bell was salvaged from the tower and taken to the new station where it 
is being cleaned and will eventually be permanently displayed. 



Animal Inspection 



Number of Cattle Inspected: 

Registered 

Grade 84 

Number of Sheep Inspected 1 

Number of Horses Inspected 88 

Number of Goats Inspected 3 

Number of Swine Inspected 1,637 

Number of Barns (Dairy) 

Inspected 4 

Number of Dogs Quarantined 74 

Number of Dogs with Rabies 



13 



Planning Board 



The personnel of the Planning Board has changed since the last report in that 
John Hardy found it necessary to resign due to the press of personal business. He 
has been replaced by Mr. William Haskell, Jr., who is a professor of civil engineer- 
ing at Lowell Technological Institute. 

The Planning Board must again report strong continuing growth for the Town of 
Andover . The Board reviewed a total of eleven subdivision plans involving a total 
of three hundred and twenty house lots. Of the eight definitive plans reviewed, six 
plans with one hundred and eight house lots were approved, and two plans with eight 
house lots were disapproved. Three plans involving a total of two hundred and 
twelve house lots are still in the preliminary stage. The Planning Board also acted 
on a total of thirty-eight plans with sixty-nine house lots on existing streets, 
certifying that they were not subject to subdivision action. 

As is its custom, the Planning Board has continued to review the petitions 
which result in hearings before the Zoning Board of Appeals. Planning Board repre- 
sentatives attended the hearings and expressed the Board's views on the forty-one 
appeals which were heard in the course of the year . 

The Planning Board represented the Town at a Public Utilities Commission hearing 
concerning a proposed substation on River Road in West Andover. The Public Utilities 
Commission in granting zoning relief to the Massachusetts Electric Company deferred 
to the wishes of the Town as to screening and similar matters with respect to the 
proposed substation. The Massachusetts Electric Company was fully cooperative in 
agreeing to Planning Board suggestions. 

During the year the Board had joint meetings with, or met with representatives 
of, the Board of Selectmen, the School Committee, the Board of Health, and the Con- 
servation and Industrial Development Commissions. Its representative regularly took 
part in the activities of the Central Merrimack Valley Regional Planning District. 

The Planning Board, in line with its interest in improving the environment, has 
been active in persuading developers to place all utility distribution lines under- 
ground. The Board has held hearings covering the inclusion of underground utility 
wiring as a requirement in its Rules and Regulations. Finalization of the changes 
will take place early in 1971. 

As a result of a request for assistance from the School Committee, the Planning 
Board has furnished the committee with an up-to-date projection of population and 
school growth which is being used in the planning of physical facilities for the 
Andover school system. 

Members of the Planning Board have taken part in several special town committees 
including the School Site Concept Committee, the Sanitary Landfill Site Committee, 
and the Committee on Town Objectives and Goals. The Recreation and Open Space Com- 
mittee chaired by Mrs. James Keck of the Planning Board completed its work and is- 
sued its report early in 1970. This committee was asked to carry on the work of 
supervising the specific planning for someof the objectives which were embodied in 
its report, and a master plan for the development of the Andover Recreation Park 
will be published early in 1971. 

The Board with its consultants has been continuing its study of the housing sit- 
uation in Andover. A preliminatry investigation indicated that though there was some 
imbalance in the distribution of housing in Andover, it did not appear to be serious. 
More work will be done, calling on volunteer workers, based upon valuation informa- 
tion being obtained from the Town Assessors' data by means of a computer print-out 
method. Further, more general checks will be obtained when the census information 
has been made available. 

Currently under way is a traffic study by traffic planning consultants, Bruce 
Campbell Associates, which, when completed, should form the basis for improved Town 

14 



traffic conditions. The study will include such ramifications as off-street parking, 
traffic light changes and coordination, Town Hall and Post Office locations. 

During the year, the State Department of Public Works submitted for considera- 
tion by Andover officials alternative plans for a connector to downtown Lawrence 
from either Interstate 93 or Interstate 495. The connector from Interstate 93 ap- 
peared to be the lower cost plan as well as being more desirable from other aspects. 
However, as outlined, the road would seriously break up a sizable portion of Ando- 
ver's industrially-zoned land. Under these circumstances the Andover Planning Board, 
as well as the Andover Industrial Development Commission, feel that there is strong 
need for further study in order that a more desirable connector arrangement can be 
worked out that would yield maximum benefits to Andover 's industrial zone while pro- 
viding the much needed Lawrence connector. 



Board of Appeals 



The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals, operating under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40A, has three regular members and three associate members, the latter sit- 
ting in the absence of a regular member. The Board has a Chairman and a Clerk and 
has adopted rules and regulations governing the filing of applications and the pros- 
ecution of appeals. It sits at twelve regularly scheduled monthly hearings, on the 
first Thursday of every month. 

During the 1970 year forty-two petitions were heard and disposed of as follows: 

17 petitions granted 

4 petitions denied 

9 petitions withdrawn 

12 petitions pending 

42 

A total of $880.00 for advertising fees was collected and turned over to the 
Town Treasurer and the Town Collector. 

The Board's activity includes not only hearings but also views taken by it, 
consultation amongst its members in arriving at decisions, correspondence, and the 
drafting of decisions. On rare occasions time is required to testify in court upon 
an appeal from one of the Board's decisions. The number of hours spent by the var- 
ious members upon Board business totals between 250 and 300 hours a year. 

The Board would like to express its appreciation for the substantial assistance 
it receives from the Building Inspector and his staff. 



G. L. S. D. C. 



The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Commission had a busy and productive 
year of activity in 1970. The Commission had one change inmembership when Donald C. 
Bassett resigned and was replaced by Roy E. Coombs, Jr., as the representative from 
the Town of Andover. The Commission met fourteen times, and the following are its 
accomplishments : 

1. The 1965 report prepared for the City of Lawrence covering "Sewage and 
Sewage Treatment Facilities" was accepted as the official plan for the 
Greater Lawrence Sanitary District by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Water Resources Commission, Division of Water Pollution Control and the 
Office of Planning and Coordination. 

2. The Acts of 1968 Chapter 750 under which the Greater Lawrence Sanitary 
District was established were amended under Chapter 320 of the Acts of 
1970. This amendment was required to provide clarification of the or- 
iginal act in order to satisfy the Bond Counsel. 

3. The Commission authorized on August 8, 1970, Orders of Land Taking for 

15 



the four parcels of land required for the treatment plant and the two 
pumping stations as well as an access easement over Charles Street to 
the treatment plant site in North Andover . This action completed much 
activity by the Commission in obtaining land use approval from the 
State Department of Public Health and other regulatory bodies, land 
title search, and land appraisals. Funds for this action were ob- 
tained in the form of a loan from the Arlington Trust Company. The 
City of Lawrence has instituted a petition for assessment of damages 
based on the award by the Commission of $162,660 for land at the air- 
port in North Andover. The Commission's award for land in Methuen is 
being accepted and a reply from Charles Matses regarding the award 
for two parcels of land in North Andover is expected shortly. 

4. The Commission, on August 5, 1970, executed a contract in the amount 
of $1,173,400 with Camp, Dresser and McKee in Boston for the prepara- 
tion of final detailed construction plans, specifications, and con- 
tract documents for the Waste Treatment Plant, Pumping Stations, and 
Interceptor Sewers. An additional authorization for field surveys 
and subsoil exploration with an upper limit of $175,000 is included 
in this contract . 

5. The Commission passed a resolution on June 10, 1970, calling for an 
expenditure of $6,600,000 as the Commission's share of the cost of 
the treatment facilities. 

6. The Commission received Advance Planning Grants from the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, Division of Water Pollution Control in the amounts 
of $1,183,000 for a Waste Water Treatment Plant and $165,100 for In- 
terceptor Sewers and Metering Stations. These grants were accepted 
on September 24, 1970, and enabled the authorization of work to pro- 
ceed under the contract signed with Camp, Dresser and McKee on 
August 5, 1970. 

Many of these accomplishments were in compliance with the implementation sched- 
ule for the construction of the treatment facilities established by the Division of 
Water Pollution Control and to qualify for the Advance Planning Grants. 

The Commission is now proceeding on the following implementation schedule: 

Completion of final plans By March 15, 1972 

Start of construction Stage 1 By September 15, 1972 

Completion of construction Stage 1 By March 15, 1975 

Start of construction Stage 2 By March 15, 1974 

Completion of construction Stage 2 By March 15, 1976 

Andover will be primarily affected by the construction of Stage 1 which in- 
cludes the connection of the Andover outfall to the District Interceptor Sewer on 
the south bank of the Merrimack River . It appears that this construction schedule 
is realistic becuase the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has authorized a bond issue 
under Chapter 747 of the Acts of 1970 which provides funds to cover the 55% Federal 
and 25% State contribution towards the cost of treatment facilities for the Greater 
Lawrence Sanitary District. It is estimated that Andover should be contemplating 
the need for its share of the capital funds starting late in 1972. Until that time 
the financial requirements will be very modest as indicated by the request for $500 
to cover Andover 's share of the District operating costs for 1971. 

The Commission is actively engaged in working with its consulting engineers on 
the development of the construction plans and specifications. It is also actively 
engaged in the development of its own sewer ordinance. This development work will 
be shared with the individual municipalities after the preliminary formulation is 
complete. From all indications the Commonwealth will also require the establishment 
of individual sewer ordinances from the member municipalities in the District. These 
two items, coupled with the maintenance of routine business, will constitute the major 
activity of the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District in 1971. 

16 



Conservation Commission 

By vote of the March, 1970, annual Town Meeting, $100,000.00 in new funds was 
appropriated for the use of the Conservation Commission to purchase fee or lesser 
rights in: 

1. A strip of land coinciding with former Essex Company right holdings 
along the Merrimack River from the terminus of the A.V.I.S. hold- 
ings near Brundrett Avenue downstream to the Phillips Academy boat- 
house site, near the Lawrence city line. 

2. The Cyr gravel pit off Woburn Street near the Wilmington town line. 

At year's end the Commission was still actively engaged in negotiations for 
these parcels and had secured a purchase and sale agreement for the riverfront por- 
tion of the Strazzulla Brothers property behind the Vocational Technical High 
School . 

March, 1970, Town Meeting voted to transfer ten acres, more or less, of town- 
owned land fronting on Fish Brook, in the Greenwood Road area, originally the gift 
of Mrs. Sarah Youmans to the Town, to the jurisdiction of the Conservation Commis- 
sion. Town Meeting of October, 1970, voted to transfer several town-owned lots 
along the Shawsheen River, acquired by tax title, to the management of the Conserv- 
ation Commission. Mr. Frank Catalano deeded six acres of "green area" off Cardinal 
Lane to the ownership of the Town and the control of the Conservation Commission. 

The State Department of Natural Resources made two awards to the Town from its 
Self-Help Fund in 1970: $35,000 for the Shlakis purchase and $18,700 for the Gara- 
bedian purchase, the former completed in 1969 and the latter in 1970. 

Town Meeting voted to transfer $42,000 to the Conservation Fund, representing 
the amount of the Self-Help award for the 1969 Davidson purchase. 

With these funds the Conservation Commission will make every effort to continue 
its land acquisition program as outlined in the "Report of the Recreation and Open 
Space Advisory Committee" which was formally presented to the townspeople at an open 
meeting held in April, 1970. 

The above committee under the aegis of the Planning Board and chaired by Mrs. 
Margaret Keck, continued its activities relative to planning the Pomps Pond Park, at 
the request of the Town Manager. This plan will be ready in 1971. 

Following recommendations made during 1969 by engineers and soil scientists, 
the Department of Public Works completed two of the three dikes at Pomps Pond and 
vicinity and installed structures which will allow control of water level in the 
wildlife marsh between Pomps Pond and the Shawsheen River. Pumping of water from 
the wells near Pomps Pond into the pond was initiated during the summer. The level 
of the pond remained high and the water cooler than usual, but algal growth in- 
creased. It is hoped that funds will be appropriated to complete the third dike in 
1971 which should allow closer control of the level of the pond itself . 

Some of the Conservation Land Overseers committees have been active during 1970 
policing and inspecting their lands, suggesting improvements and posting signs. 

Rules and Regulations governing the use of conservation lands were prepared and 
submitted to all concerned town officials for criticism, adopted and published during 
1970. A shortened and simplified version of them was printed on durable plastic 
sheets for posting on the various parcels of conservation land. With the help of 
members of Overseers Committees and Scout groups, some areas were posted. It is in- 
tended that all such land will be duly posted and identified during 1971. 

Some trail work in the Pomps area and planting of grass, trees, and shrubs (in 
part donated by the U. S. Department of Agriculture) was accomplished during 1970. 

17 



The actual planting was carried out by a group of students from Abbot and Phillips 
Academies, under the supervision of Mr. Rennie McQuilken and Mrs. Virginia H. Ham- 
mond. Mr. Joseph Monan and Mr. Ralph Preble both worked in the Foster's Island 
area, assisted by Boy Scouts. 

It was decided to ban hunting on conservation lands, in conjunction with a vote 
of a majority of the Board of Selectmen not to allow hunting on any of the town- 
owned lands under its jurisdiction. 

Mr. Busby, the Tree Superintendent, is serving on the Haggetts Reservation 
Overseers and, as directed by the Town Manager, is doing as much tree work and grass 
mowing as limited time and manpower will allow, on this and other Conservation lands. 
The Department of Public Works is also cooperating in various maintenance problems, 
such as erosion control, trash removal, and the like. 

A trail committee was recruited as a subcommittee of the Conservation Commis- 
sion during 1970 and is currently active in preparing an inventory of existing pub- 
lic and semi-public trails. Eventually it hopes to make recommendations for addi- 
tional easements and acquisitions to create a town-wide trail system The members 
of the Trail Committee are: 

Ronald Valentine, Chairman 

Alan French 

Joseph Newell 

Patricia Keck 

Robert Perreault 

James Christopher 

Additional volunteers will be welcome, as the project is difficult and complex. 

The Commission joined with A.V.I.S. to celebrate "Reservations Day" by guided 
tours of the Pomps Pond area and of Haggetts Reservation on two successive Saturdays 
in April. 



AVIS 



Andover Village Improvement Society (AVIS) increased its membership substan- 
tially in 1970 and experienced a very productive year. For those new to the com- 
munity, it may be well to explain that AVIS, founded in 1895, is a private, non- 
profit organization dedicated to conservation, with membership open to all and op- 
erated entirely in the public interest. In recent years it has acquired consider- 
able land holdings, all by gift or by purchase with private funds at no expense to 
the taxpayer. It now has 586 acres, all open without charge for the use and enjoy- 
ment of the public. Its lands are shown on a recently published map, a limited 
number of which are still available to those interested in the objectives of the 
Society. These may be obtained by writing to AVIS, P. 0. Box 90, Andover. 

The original acquisition of AVIS, the 23 acre Indian Ridge Reservation, is 
graced by a bronze tablet honoring Miss Alice Buck, Andover 's conservational pio- 
neer, who was largely responsible for obtaining that reservation. The tablet, 
which is affixed to a large rock, has recently been reconditioned, courtesy of Voke 
School students. It is located on a high ridge off Red Spring Road, and the public 
is invited to inspect this impressive memorial. 

The most recent acquisition of AVIS, received in December, 1970, is the "Ann 
Rawlins Greene Reservation," the bequest of the late John Gardner Greene, left in 
honor of his wife. This 31 acre parcel, situated close to the junction of Andover 
Street and Dascomb Road in Ballardvale, and running through to Bannister Road, has 
an interesting variety of terrain — ridge, valley, and cattail swamp. It consti- 
tutes the eighth major reservation of AVIS and is a notable addition to the land 
available to the public in Andover. 

An additional small parcel of land of some 8,000 square feet was acquired in 
November to complete the Society's ownership and protection of the bank of the 

18 



Shawsheen River from Central Street, along Lupine Road to the point where the river 
flows under the railroad bridge. 

Considerable work has been put into improving and opening up new trails on AVIS 
reservations, for easier public access. Particularly, an improved peripheral trail 
has been completed on the Harold R. Rafton Reservation. This begins and ends about 
100 yards from the end of the blacktop on the north side of High Plain Road, near 
the top of Wood Hill. It is plainly marked with a new sign for easy identification. 

The Shawsheen River is one of the most valuable natural assets of Andover , and 
it was formerly used for swimming. In recent years, however, it has suffered pollu- 
tion and become the repository of a variety of trash. AVIS has taken a leading 
role in cleaning up the river. With the eager cooperation of students of Phillips 
and Abbot Academies and of Andover High School and of some faculty members sources 
of pollution have been located and reported and large quantities of rubbish have 
been removed from the river and its banks. If the communities upstream will also do 
their part in cleanup and pollution control, it is hoped that the river may, in the 
not too distant future, again become suitable for swimming. 

Development and Industrial Commission 

At the March Town Meeting the Commission supported Article 48 changing a small 
parcel bordering on the Lawrence Industrial Park from residential to industrial use. 
The land has no access to any street in Andover. 

At the October Town Meeting the Commission supported Article 6 upgrading the 
land bordered by Haverhill Street, the Shawsheen River, and the railroad from General 
Industrial to Industrial "A." This matter had been discussed with the firms in the 
area; their consent was obtained. 

The Commission supported a variance to permit access from River Road across 
residentially zoned land to an industrial parcel which is landlocked, provided that 
the access be landscaped and set back from the adjacent residential lots. At this 
writing, the Appeals Board has not published a decision. 

The Commission supported a variance to erect a commercial building in the In- 
dustrial "D" zone on Andover Street, provided that the land be landscaped and made 
compatible with the adjacent residential zone. The variance was granted. 

The Commission did not object to Article 37, March Town Meeting, appropriating 
funds to the Conservation Commission to acquire an industrial strip of Merrimack 
River front (amended to give free pipe easements to abutting industry) , nor to Arti- 
cle 8, October Town Meeting, transferring industrial Shawsheen River front in the 
Lowell Junction area to conservation. 

Raytheon has completed the construction of its West Andover facility. The 
tract has been suitably landscaped. The plant does not create air or water pollu- 
tion, as it is electrically heated and discharges its sanitary and industrial ef- 
fluent into the Town sewer. 

New ramps at the northeast and southwest corners of the Route 93/133 inter- 
change are now aiding the traffic flow to and from Raytheon and Internal Revenue 
Center . 

Industrial building is continuing to broaden the tax base as shown below: 

Year Total Valuation Industry Valuation % 

1/1/68 $163,423,300 $ 9,828,000 6.00 

Growth 12,132,700 6,024,100 

1/1/69 175,556,000 15,852,100 9.03 

Growth 12,943,500 6,731,900 

1/1/70 188,499,500 22,584,000 - 11.98 

19 



The taxes which the Town receives from industry far outweigh the expenditures 
which the Town makes for industry's benefit: 

Industrial Real Estate Taxes : 

$22,584,000 x 46/100 = $1,038,864 

Expenditures : 

Bonds (principal and interest) $ 145,460 
From revenue (special articles 

and as part of general budget) $ 140,000 



Council on Aging 



The work of the Council on Aging has continued to center mainly on the activ- 
ities of The Haven and related areas. The Council and townspeople are especially 
grateful for the outstanding efforts of the Director, Mrs. Natalie Stokham, who 
supervises the many functions of The Haven as well as the staff of volunteers who 
man the desk and telephone daily. Mrs. Stokham' s kindness and understanding are 
much appreciated by the visitors to The Haven. 

This year the Council, with the aid and cooperation of the School Department, 
and especially Miss Ratynski, the Director of Cafeterias, began the establishment 
of a daily hot lunch program at East Junior High School. For fifty cents, any Ando- 
verite over sixty who signs up can go to the cafeteria of the East Junior High 
School at 12:45 p.m. and have a hot, nourishing lunch each day that school is in 
session. At first the program seemed to give promise of acceptance and fill a need. 
However, in recent weeks the program support has dwindled almost to the point of 
nonexistence . 

The regular monthly luncheons at the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Tech- 
nical High School continue to be held on the first Tuesday of each month and are 
well attended. 

Classes in oil painting and crewel embroidery, as well as seasonal classes in 
pine cone decorations, are held each week at The Haven. Friday afternoons are ex- 
clusively for the men and have become increasingly popular. 

Other regularly scheduled activities include a bowling group, a program of 
films sponsored by Memorial Hall Library one afternoon each month, and special trips 
to various places of interest. Recent trips have included a sightseeing ride to 
Westminster, Massachusetts, with a luncheon stop at The Old Mill; a trip to Plymouth, 
Massachusetts; a shopping excursion to the Burlington Mall; and many others. Trips 
are planned throughout the year. 

The Andover Service Club replaced the station wagon given to The Haven with a 
new 1971 model. This vehicle is used on a regular schedule to provide shopping 
transportation for senior residents of Andover in all areas of town. It is used 
for out-of-town shopping trips on occasions and also for transporting Andoverites 
to doctors, dentists, clinic appointments, and other related activities. Drivers 
are all volunteers who have been approved for such service . 

The Council is currently reviewing its questionnaire of a few years ago with 
an aim toward updating it and establishing new areas in which the Council might 
render service. 

The present members of the Council are: Attorney Edward A. Gordon, Chairman; 
Mrs. Janet D. Lake; Mrs. Suzanne Stephens; Mrs. Hazel Wilson; Mr. Leslie Bartow; 
and new members, Mr. Jason Wright and Attorney Michael Morris. The resignation of 
Mr. Robert King was reluctantly accepted in the Spring. 

The Council is especially gratified by the steadily increasing use of the fa- 
cilities at The Haven. 

20 



Inspection 



During the year 1970 there were 510 Electrical Permits issued and categorized 
as follows: 

New Structures 135 

Other (Oil Burners, Temporary 

Service, Remodelling) 375 

Total fees turned over to the Town Treasurer and the Town Collector were 
$2,475.00. 



Police Department 



The year 1970 was a memorable one for the Police Department, as it was the 
year when the new Public Safety Center was officially opened. For the first time 
adequate space both as to personnel and equipment was made available. The Public 
Safety Center is, without doubt, one of the finest in the Commonwealth. 

In 1970 police services were provided by a force consisting of a Chief, one 
Lieutenant, four Sergeants, and thirty-one Patrolmen. There were also ten full-time 
and two part-time Crossing Guards. Two civilian employees performed clerical and 
maintenance work. The department operated four patrol cars, one of which is 
equipped for emergency ambulance service. Two unmarked cars, one used by detectives 
and one usually used for travelling back and forth to court plus a three-wheel 
Cushman for use by the officer in the business district make up the department's 
vehicles . 

In 1970 the Police Department received 4,959 miscellaneous complaints, an in- 
crease of 478 over the year 1969. Five hundred and twenty-six persons were ar- 
raigned in court, 23 less than in 1969. Of the 526 persons brought into court, 183 
were for motor vehicle violations, of which 89 were for speeding. There were 111 
arrests made for drunkenness, four being juvenile arrests. 

During 1970 there were 128 cases of breaking and entering reported to the de- 
partment, and there were 22 attempted breaks reported. This is a slight decrease 
(7) in actual breaks and 11 less attempts . 

There were 128 larcenies of property valued at over $50.00 and 232 larcenies 
under $50.00. This also represents a slight decrease over 1969 (7) in the over 
$50.00 category, but an increase of 43 in the under $50.00 category. An interest- 
ing sidelight in the latter group, of the 232 articles reported stolen, 101 were 
bicycles. During the year at least 150 bicycles came into possession of the Police 
Department and about 75 were never claimed and were eventually sold at auction. 
None of those sold were registered with the department, thus no contact with the 
owners was possible. 

In 1970 there were 700 motor vehicle accidents reported in Andover. There 
were three fatal accidents, 258 personal injury accidents, and 439 property damage 
accidents. Of the three fatal accidents, two were on Route 93 and the third on a 
town street. Of the 700 reported accidents, 108 were on Route 93, 66 on Route 495, 
and 526 on town streets. During 1970, the police cars travelled a distance of 
328,722 miles. 

Parking tickets totalling 2,598 were issued in 1970. 

One arrest category which showed over 100% increase was drug arrests . In 1969 
there were 39 arrests for drug violations, and in 1970 there were 83 arrests. Of 
the 83 arrests, 70 were male, and 13 were female. The ages of the males were as 
follows: 2, 15 years; 5, 16 years; 14, 17 years; 12, 18 years; 10, 19 years; 7, 
20 years; 5, 21 years; 5, 22 years; 3, 23 years; 1, 24 years; 4, 25 years; 1, 30 
years ; and 1 , 40 years . 

21 



1966 


1967 
94 


1968 
128 


1969 
155 


1970 


104 


138 


74 


113 


100 


135 


128 


190 


175 


147 


189 


232 


21 


56 


40 


76 


43 


441 


562 


632 


614 


700 


200 


252 


283 


226 


258 


4 


4 


5 


6 


3 


425 


486 


464 


212 


148 



The females were: 3, 16 years; 6, 18 years; 1, 19 years; 1, 22 years, and 2, 
23 years . 

Following is a comparison chart showing statistics of major police activities 
for the past five years: 



Breaking and entering 

Larceny : 

Over $50.00 

Under $50.00 

Stolen Cars 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Motor Vehicle Injuries 

Motor Vehicle Deaths 

Motor Vehicle Violations 

Fire Department 

The Fire Department is established and maintained by the municipality to pro- 
vide protection of the public against injury, loss of life or property by fire, ex- 
plosion, or other causes. Because of the importance and the hazardous nature of 
this work, the firefighter engaged in it must possess stamina and courage of the 
highest order. In addition, however, he must possess certain specific knowledge 
concerning his work if he is to perform his duties efficiently and with the minimum 
risk to himself and to his fellow firefighters. He should have detailed knowledge 
of the dangers arising from heat, smoke, explosions, etc., caused by fire; of the 
hazards presented by new industries, processes and materials developed by science; 
of the construction of buildings and the hazards involved in the materials used or 
stored in them; and of the dangers inherent in the use of water at high pressures. 

Objectives of fire protection are to prevent fire from starting, to prevent 
loss of life and property in case fire starts, to confine fire to the place of ori- 
gin and to extinguish it. 

From the point of view of Town Government, this involves the services of fire 
prevention and fire fighting. Fire fighting, because it requires positive and 
dramatic action, has a far greater appeal for people than have fire preventing 
measures which involve restrictions, prohibitions, and administrative "interference" 
with what are termed "individual rights." 

The Fire Department installs, repairs, and maintains a coded fire alarm system 
comprising some three million feet of wiring, both aerial and underground, and as- 
sociated street boxes and station equipment for controlling the system. The De- 
partment operates from three stations: its headquarters at the new Public Safety 
Center, into which it moved on August 10, 1970, the Ballardvale and the West Ancbver 
Stations. Its fifty-one men use seven pieces of fire fighting equipment, including 
the new Aero-Chief elevating platform which was this year officially placed in ser- 
vice and an emergency ambulance . 

Quarterly inspections of nursing homes, hospitals, and inns as required by 
State statutes were conducted and the necessary reports filed with the proper au- 
thorities. Public and private school fire drills and inspections required by law 
were conducted. Mercantile, industrial, church, garage, and service station in- 
spections were made and reports filed. Findings and recommendations were sent to 
owners and/or occupants of dwelling houses of three or more apartments. In-service 

22 



inspections were conducted from all stations using radio controlled fire apparatus 
and a full complement of firefighters. Permits for oil storage, flammable liquid 
storage, and associated equipment were issued. Blasting permits and the new Model 
Rocketry Permits were issued in accordance with State Law. 

As in the past years, the major causes of fire were carelessness, the misuse of 
smoking materials, children and matches, and faulty electrical appliances and wiring. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



Service Calls 

Fires 

False Alarms 

Mutual Aid Calls 

Approximate Value of 
Buildings Where a Fire 
Occurred 

Approximate Loss from 
Fire 

Ambulance Calls 

Nonresidents Billed for 
Ambulance Service 

Open Air Fire Permits 
Issued 

Open Air Violations 
Issued 

Fuel Oil Heat Installation 
Permits Issued 

Explosive Use Permits 
Issued 



1970 
1,672 
418 
43 
3 

$32,195,965.00 

$862,505.27 
548 

140 

1,915 



51 



92 



19 



Building Inspections 

Conducted 926 

Fire Drills 147 

Fatalaties from Fire 

Flammable Liquids or Ex- 
plosive Storage Permits 
Issued 10 

Welding and Cutting Opera- 
tion Permits Issued 8 

Supervised Fireworks Display 
Permits Issued 1 



1969 

2,402 

493 

22 

16 

$25,630,986.00 

$84,510.96 
591 

179 

2,265 

113 

78 

32 

907 

97 



12 
14 



1968 

2,159 

520 

21 

17 

$19,660,580.00 

$68,637.00 
797 

140 

2,946 

68 
101 

27 

909 
116 





10 



23 



Building Inspection 



The purpose and scope of the Andover Building Code is to provide for safety, 
health, and public welfare through structural strength and stability, adequate 
egress, proper light and ventilation, and protection of life and property from fire 
hazards incident to design. 

Enforcement of the Town Building Code is the responsibility of the Building 
Inspector. He is also the enforcing officer for the Town Zoning By-Laws with his 
rulings subject to the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

All Board of Appeals applications are reviewed and processed through this 
office and, in addition, copies of its definitive action on all petitions are kept 
for the convenience of the general public. 

Electrical Permits are also issued by this department with the approval of the 
Electrical Inspector. Related records, fees and reports are also maintained by the 
Building Inspector's Department. 

Four gravel pits were carefully supervised and detailed reports were filed 
with the Board of Selectmen. Three of these were renewed. One is inactive and did 
not file for renewal. This department in conjunction with the Town Engineer and 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen was responsible for the issuance of several 
other soil removal permits in the amounts of 500 and 2000 cubic yards as allowed 
under Article VIII, Section VI, Earth Removal of the Town By-Laws. 

This year, at the request of the Board of Selectmen, all establishments for 
license issuance were investigated and reports were filed. 

Numerous building and zoning violations were investigated and corrected with- 
out incident. 

A total of 412 Building Permits were issued during the year 1970. 

The following is a tabulation of the Building Permits for the years 1966 
through 1970: 



TYPE 



ESTIMATED 
VALUATION 



PERMIT 
FEES 



1966 
150 Dwellings & Garages 

15 Other Buildings 
267 Additions & Alterations 
92 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools , etc. ) 



$ 2,871,500.00 

4,709,000.00 

533,797.00 

127,397.00 



524 

1967 
144 Dwellings & Garages 

10 Other Buildings 
273 Additions & Alterations 
85 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 



$ 8,270,594.00 



$ 3,299,350.00 

6,472,850.00 

666,249.00 

$10,566,504.00 



$ 8,051.00 



$28,903.00 



24 



ESTIMATED PERMIT 

TYPE VALUATION FEES 

1968 

148 Dwellings & Garages $ 3,748,028.00 

27 Other Buildings 5,768,530.00 
251 Additions & Alterations 802,590.00 

87 Others (raze, sign, swimming pools, etc. 295,425.00 

513 $10,614,753.00 $24,372.00 

13 Soil Removals 39.00 

$24,411.00 

1969 

131 Dwellings & Garages $ 3,509,700.00 

28 Other Buildings 11,833,200.00 
200 Additions & Alterations 471,655.00 
107 Others (raze, sign, swimming pools, etc.) 129,159.00 

466 $15,943,714.00 $45,831.00 

1 Soil Removal 12.00 

$45,843.00 

1970 

85 Dwellings & Garages $ 2,370,500.00 

6 Other Buildings 949,500.00 

224 Additions & Alterations 947,575.00 

97 Others (raze, sign, swimming pools, etc.) 200,175.00 

412 $ 4,467,750.00 $13,205.00 

3 Soil Removals 39.00 

415 $ 4,467,750.00 $13,244.00 

Dog Officer 

Lost Dogs 97 

Dogs Found 62 

Dogs Ordered Restrained 91 

Dog Complaints 780 

Dogs Sold 29 

Dogs Sent to Harvard 2 

Owners Contacted for Having Unlicensed Dogs . . 417 

Impounded Dogs (unlicensed) 80 

Impounded Dogs (licensed) 3 

Money Turned in to Town Treasurer - Dogs Sold $87.00 

In addition, numerous cats and other small animals are picked up, and dead 
animals are picked up and cremated. 



25 



Housing Authority 



John B. White, Jr., was re-elected to the Andover Housing Authority for a five- 
year term in March, 1970. 

Of all the bills passed by the State Legislature this year, Cnapter 853 has had 
the greatest effect on Andover public housing. This bill, effective December 1, 
1970, set a limit of 25% of income on rents paid by elderly persons wno are resident 
in State-aided housing projects. As a result, the average monthly rent in our Eld- 
erly Housing Projects was reduced from $55.00 to $47.00. 

As there are thirty-nine eligible applicants for elderly housing on a waiting 
list, the Authority is giving serious consideration to construction of a new elderly 
housing project. 

Andover has a Veterans' Housing Project, Andover 200-1, on Memorial Circle, 
containing fifty-six two, three, and four bedroom units, opened in 1950; two Elderly 
Housing Projects, Andover 667-1, Chestnut Court, opened in 1959, and Andover 667-2, 
Grandview Terrace, opened in 1969. Each elderly project contains forty one-bedroom 
units . 

VETERANS' PROJECT 200-1 

Thirteen new families moved into the project this year and four tenant families 
moved within the project. There are ten eligible veteran applicants on a waiting 
list. 

Yearly income limits for admittance to the Veterans' Project, based on the num- 
ber of minor dependents, are: one minor dependent, $4,800; two minor dependents, 
$5,000; three minor dependents, $5,200. The average monthly rental, including util- 
ities, is $85.00. 

Development cost for this project was $626,000, financed with Housing Authority 
Bonds @ 2 1/8% interest, of which $204,000 has been retired, and will become the 
property of the Town when paid for in 1992 . 

Payment in lieu of taxes to the Town of Andover was $2,016. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses for the Veterans' 
Project for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1970. 

Income 

Rents and Interest 

State Aid 

Prior Year's Surplus 

Expense 

Management Expense 

Utilities 

Repairs, Maintenance & Replacements 

Insurance 

Contribution to Pension Funds 

Payment in Lieu of Taxes 

Reserves 

Debt Service 

Surplus 



$54,851 


.19 








9,650 


.00 








6,000 


.00 


$70 


,501 


19 


8,521 


.14 








14,921 


,03 








8,801 


.14 








1,445 


.62 








559 


.00 








2,016 


.00 








4,704 


.00 








22,918 


.20 


63 , 


,886. 


13 






$ 6 


,615 


06 



26 



ELDERLY HOUSING PROJECTS 667-1 and 667-2 

Yearly income limits for admission are: for one person, 65 years of age or 
older, $2,500; for two persons, 65 years of age or older, $3,000. 

Development cost for the two projects was $1,155,000, financed by Housing Au- 
thority Notes, of which $94,000 has been retired. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses for the fiscal year 
ending December 31, 1970, for the two projects: 

Income 

Rents and Interest $54,135.08 

State Aid 69,300.00 

Prior Year's Surplus 8,000.00 $131,435.08 

Expense 

Management Expense 4,849.58 

Utilities 12,853.97 

Repairs, Maintenance and Replacements 5,533.90 

Insurance 2,325.94 

Accruals 7,122.00 

Debt Service Requirements 83,700.00 116,385.39 

Surplus $ 15,049.69 



Game Warden 



During the year 1970, the Game Warden's Department conducted 340 investigations 
of all types. Most investigations were of a minor nature with some written and 
some verbal warnings given. 

In many cases, the Game Warden was called upon to remove wild life from private 
homes or land. This was done by means of a live trap. The animals taken in this 
manner were released in some remote wooded section of the town unless they were 
sick, in which case they were either destroyed or sent to the Department of Natural 
Resources for research. 

Most people involved in hunting and fishing violations were very cooperative 
and were ignorant of the fact that they were breaking town bylaws or state laws. 
The majority of these violators were minors. There were some court cases which re- 
sulted in fines being imposed and, in some cases, firearms were impounded for pen- 
alty periods. In all court convictions, licenses were revoked for one year. 

During the year this department had six speaking engagements. 

The local enforcement officers under the direction of Department of Natural 
Resources Officer Gordon Como ran many hunter safety courses for boys and girls be- 
tween 14 and 18 years of age. It is very gratifying that 98% of the students grad- 
uated with better than average marks . 

The Department is appreciative of the fine cooperation received from the local 
Police Department and from Officer Como. 



27 



School Department 



The following represents a general but deliberate effort to offer the best 
educational program to the students of Andover . We, as a school system, are com- 
mitted to the course of action specified in our goals. 

As we look to tne future we see early childhood education a significant aspect 
of community service. A problem remedied early in life is both psychologically and 
economically a savings tor society. 

It should be stated that we will make the best use of our present facilities 
before considering alternatives. Such practices as the year-round school, extended 
school day, and community education have been examined for specific application in 
Andover. We do have a space problem. 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

We view education as a process of learning. In simple terms, it is a process 
of inquiry, exploration and application wtiicn can be developed by any individual at 
any age in or out of school. We (shall) use the terms here to denote the basic 
character ot the three levels of schooling which an Andover student normally pur- 
sues. In other words, children between the ages of 3 - 9 are in an inquiry stage 
development where there is a natural curiosity that should be developed further. 
Students between the ages of 10 - 14 should begin to explore their environment, and 
students 15 and above should apply the results of their inquiry and exploration. 
Presently, we generally consider these levels to be elementary, junior high, and 
senior high. We are suggesting a reconsideration of this grade grouping where pos- 
sible. To be more specific, let us now examine the three schools. 

The purposes of the Inquiry School for children 3-9 are: 

1. To develop the skills for self-education, reading, writing, math, etc. 

2. To encourage the natural curiosity of students in pursuit of individ- 
ual interests . 

3. To develop a positive self-image and social consciousness. 
The purposes of the Exploratory School for children 10 - 14 are: 

1. To further develop and refine self-education skills. 

2. To explore self-interests. 

3. To participate in the democratic process. 

The purposes of the App lication School for students 15 and above are: 

1. To construct and carry out projects inside and outside the school. 

2. To involve students in using both school and community resources in 
fulfilling possible life styles. 

3. To further develop a student's awareness of himself and his abilities. 

In an attempt to achieve and fulfill the above purposes we have established 
five year goals. We believe these goals are significant because they encompass 
basic skills, social development, and the pursuit of personal interests. It is 
imperative that the school be a place wnere a cnila explores his personal motiva- 
tions. Such opportunity in a school program is far more significant than we might 
assume . 



28 



FIVE YEAR GOALS 

1. To have our students achieve a standard established for the communication 
skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) by the end of the sixth 
grade. The standards for each area will be established by the staff and 
shared with the community. Every year, a student's mastery of skills will 
be compared with the established norms for his age level. Those students 
needing attention will receive it. This approach places heavy emphasis on 
development rather than on remediation. In other words, we would rather 
work with the problems early in the student's career than spend additional 
resources when the student is older. As an example, a seven-year-old 
child may have a skill problem in reading. If this is not alleviated by 
the time he is ten or twelve years old, the skill problem has also become 
a psychological problem requiring additional resources. The later years 
of a student's life (Exploratory and Application School) should be spent 
in exploring his environment, using the strong foundation of communication 
skills established in the elementary school. 

2. To have students completing the sixth grade at a level of mathematical 
achievement established by our staff. The purpose and strategy for achiev- 
ing this goal is similar to the above plan for the area of communication 
skills . 

3. To keep 100 per cent of our students informed of their positive character- 
istics in respect to skills, abilities, and personality dimensions. It is 
very difficult to assess the numbers of students presently receiving pos- 
itive feedback other than what appears on the report card. 

This is not to infer that such a program is currently non-existent, 
but rather that a more deliberate effort should be made to let our children 
know their positive qualities. Although this may not seem significant to 
some individuals, many students are badly in need of improving the image 
they have of themselves. Both fellow students and staff are valuable as- 
sets in achieving this goal. 

4. To have 100 per cent of our students working on projects during the school 
day — such projects should be directly related to the student's interest 
and abilities. 

5. To have 100 per cent of our students informed regarding our physical fit- 
ness model and to be working towards or maintaining that model . The level 
of success depends, of course, on the individual and his limitations. 

6. To help 100 per cent of our juniors establish alternative career goals. 

7. To establish the building-space needs required for housing our students in 
the year 2000. We shall seek the support of the community in developing 
plans for adequate facilities. 

8. To urge 100 per cent participation in the democratic process. 

9. To seek 100 per cent particiapation between home and school in the educa- 
tional process. 

10. To help 100 per cent of our students develop patterns for use of leisure 
time . 

11. To guide pupils in the process of discovering knowledge and assist them. 

12. To promote 100 per cent participation in learning rules of parenthood and 
child-rearing . 

13. To insure that 100 per cent of our students experience activities that in- 
clude all phases of the fine arts. 

29 



14. To see that all students, who either terminate formal education at the 
twelfth grade or drop out before, shall be placed in jobs no later than 
three months after leaving school. 



G.LR.V.T. High School 



The development and nurturing of people of all ages for education and daily 
living is an ongoing process for our school. This is immediately discernible by 
the readers of this report . 

The growth pattern continues in all our schools as noted by the indicators 
such as enrollments, types of schools, programs and functions. In keeping with our 
school use slogan, "The Crossroads of Communities in Action for All Ages," we have 
been deluged by users, including senior citizens, civic groups, Boy Scouts, Girl 
Scouts, Y.M.C.A., youth groups, municipal contingents, physically handicapped, 
mentally handicapped, church and club affiliates and industrial concerns in the 
area as well as apprentice groups from several of our local unions. 

Regretfully, we are not serving all deserving agencies at this time due to 
limitations locked in by laws, traditional practices and current building facilities. 
However, with the advent of our expansion, which has been fraught with some diffi- 
culties in the past, we shall be able to serve more of our citizenry, hospitals, 
rest homes, health occupations and those involved in medicare and medic-aid. 

In terms of success in serving our four communities, we have Dut to look at 
the record depicted in the ensuing pages. 

Statistical Report 

The shared time program which was designed to provide instruction in a skill 
for 11th and 12th grade students from the various member communities commenced Sep- 
tember, 1970. Although the number of applicants is small, it is noteworthy that 
the enthusiasm of these young people is excellent. 

Municipality No. of Students 

Andover 

Lawrence 4 

Methuen 7 

North Andover 

11 

It is expected that from this small beginning a pattern may be developed to 
serve others in the 11th and 12th grades who were not prepared to enter from the 8th 
grade due to one reason or another. 

Based upon experience to date, indications are that recommendations in the 
Schaef er-Kaufman report prepared for the Massachusetts Advisory Council on Educa- 
tion would have little, if any, validity. However, in the desire to contribute to 
the over-all effort of education to maintain and extend relevance to all youth, con- 
tinued enrollment in shared time instruction should be encouraged. 

Guidance Services: 

1. Admissions: 

a. 8th grade students contacted 1187 

b. 8th grade students tested 425 

c. Enrolled for 9th grade 168 

2. Testing: 

D.A.T 529 

Otis 168 

S. R. A. Diagnostic Arithmetic Test 168 

Kuder Vocational Preference Inventory 168 

30 



Guidance Services (Cont . ) : 

3. Counselling: 

Educational Counselling 271 

Vocational Counselling 350 

Personal Counselling 362 

Parental Conferences 76 

Schools and Programs: 

a. Part-time Cooperative School: 

Cooperating agencies 29 

Cooperating students 73 

Average salary $2.00 per hour; salary range 
$1.75 - $2.50 per hour. 

b. Day School: 

Enrollment October 1, 1970 678 

c. Industrial Entry Program: 

Enrollment 1970 - 71 school year 116 

d. Evening School: 

Enrollment 1970 - 71 990 

e. Summer School Activity, 1970: 

Algebra I (2 groups) 37 

Reading (2 groups) 29 

Automotive 19 

Chemistry 11 

Culinary Art 14 

110 

Instructors - - 5 
Supervisor - - 1 

Enrollment records as of October 1, 1970, indicate: 

Total Regular Day Student Enrollment by Grade and Community: 
Grade 
Municipality 9 10 11 12 13 14 PG 1 PG 2 Total 

Andover 9 11 10 8 1 1 2 2 44 

Lawrence 104 100 79 70 11 8 7 4 383 

Methuen 47 58 42 40 8 3 1 1 200 

North Andover _8 13 11 11 _± _1 _4 _2 51 

168 182 142 129 21 13 14 9 678 

Evening School Enrollment by Community Indicates: 

Municipality No. of Students 

Andover 112 

Lawrence 372 

Methuen 172 

North Andover 66 

Nonresidents 268 

Total 990 



31 



Personnel 



Statistics 



Administration : 

(Superintendent of District . . . 1/2 

(Director of School 1/2 

Assistant Director 1 

Vocational Coordinator 1 

Pupil Personnel Services 

Coordinator 1 

Office Personnel 

Principal Clerks 2 

Senior Clerk 1 

Junior Clerks 2 

Part-time Clerks 3 

Accountant 1 

Instructional : 

Academic Instructors 15 

Related Technology Instructors. . 11 

Shop and Laboratory Instructors . 32 

Librarian 1 

Counselors 2 

Non-instructional : 

Nurse 1 

Audio-Visual Aide 1 

Cafeteria : 

Manager 1 

Full-time Workers 

Part-time Workers 6 

Custodial and Bus Driving: 

Senior Custodian 1 

Custodians 11 



Non-instructional (cont . ) : 
Transportation: 

Buses 10 

Part-time Bus Drivers .... 10 

Evening School: 

Supervision 2 

Instructors 42 

Students 990 

Industrial Entry (High School Students) 

Supervision 1 

Instructors 7 

Students 116 

School Lunch Participation: 

September 1966 65% 

October 1967 75% 

December 1967 91% 

December 1968 87% 

December 1969 105% 

December 1970 111% 

Athletics : 

Sport Coaches 

Basketball " 3 

Baseball 3 

Football 5 

Track 3 

Cross Country 1 

Wrestling 1 

Indoor Track 1 

Hockey 1 

Athletics Coordinator 1 



n Graduates: 








12th Grade 




14th Grade 




Post- 


Graduates 


Number Graduated 
Number Placed 
Average Salary 
Armed Services 
School 




152 

141 

2.27 hr. 

5 

6 




8 
4 
3.00 hr 

4 






3. 


3 

3 

00 




hr . 


Separated: 








Grades 


















j at 6 


9th 


10th 


11th 12th 


13th 


14th 


PG1 




PG2 


Transfer 
Employment 
Armed Services 
Moved 0ut-of-S1 


11 
2 





8 





7 





1 





1 







1 






3 








2 








Financial 


Report for 


1970 















December 31, 1970 General Fund Account, Arlington Trust Co. $289,981.74 
December 31, 1970 Contingency Account, Bay State Bank 61,396.37 

December 31, 1970 Earned Interest 

Interest on Certificates of Deposit 17,560.96 

Interest on General Fund Savings Account 

#S. 0301 9,855.20 

Interest on Contingency Account, Bay 

State Bank 1,239.89 



32 





Total 




Transfers 


Adjusted 
















Budget 




Within 


Budget 


Total 












Function 


Dollars 


Functions 


Dollars 


Expenditure 


Balance 


General Control $ 


74,620 


00 


($10,000.00) $ 


64,620.00 


$ 49 


011 


50 


$15 


608 


50 


Expense of 






















Instruction 


885,835 


00 





885,835.00 


846 


938 


29 


38 


896 


71 


Auxiliary 






















Agencies 


86,625 


00 





86,625.00 


73 


716 


50 


12 


908 


50 


Cost of Trans- 






















portation 


22,000 


00 





22,000.00 


20 


028 


70 


1 


971 


30 


Operation of 






















Plant 


167,635 


00 





167,635.00 


163 


332 


62 


4 


302 


38 


Maintenance 






















of Plant 


49,641 


00 


10,000.00 


59,641.00 


58 


334 


95 


1 


306 


05 


Special Charges 


53,000 


00 





53,000.00 


50 


663 


13 


2 


336 


87 


Miscellaneous 


16,400 


00 





16,400.00 


11 


661 


70 


4 


738 


30 


Outlay 


44,500 


00 


( 10,950.00) 


33,550.00 


21 


958 


40 


11 


591 


60 


Debt Retirement 


170,000 


00 





170,000.00 


170 


000 


00 









Debt Service* 


187,150 


00 


10,950.00 


198,100.00 


195 


530 


21 


2 


569 


79 



$1,757,406.00 $1 , 757 , 406 . 00 $1 , 661 , 176 . 00 $96 , 230 . 00 

Variance from 

Budget Income 1 . 50 1.50 

Adjusted Grand Total $1,757,404.50 $1,661,176.00 $96,228.50 

♦Debt Service Total Expenditures $201,515.21 
Interest on Bonds 5 , 985 . 00 

$195,530.21 

Unexpended Budget Dollars $96,228.50 

State Sales and Meals Tax Paid in 1970 for Productivity 899.82 

Total Unexpended Budget Dollars $97,128.32 

Due to the elimination of the auditorium and the reorientation of the initial 
expansion plans, we have had to provide assembly spaces and academic lecture areas 
through the open-wall concept. This approach was dictated by the failure of Methuen 
to approve our original plans. With the continued rise in construction costs, our 
architects are making every effort to provide alternates so that our school building 
expansion costs will comply with the amount approved by the member communities. 
Ground breaking is planned for early spring. 

The continued encouragement by the citizenry, agencies, and industry is most 
appreciated by the Regional School District Committee and the administration of the 
Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School District . 



Veterans' Services 



During 1970, the Office of Veterans' Services interviewed more than twenty-two 
hundred individuals and provided assistance in alleviating some of their pressing 
problems. All factors indicate that with the increasing number of returning serv- 
icemen and the escalating unemployment the applicants seeking the help of this de- 
partment in the coming year will show a substantial rise. 

Under provisions of Chapter 115 of the General Laws, financial assistance was 
given to thirty-seven permanent recipients and one hundred fifty-nine temporary re- 
cipients during the year. All of the permanent cases are being aided in their ever 

33 



increasing medical expenses, and in some cases it is necessary to supplement their 
income to maintain a decent standard of living. Temporary cases usually are occa- 
sioned by lack of income due to illness or injury to the head of the family; how- 
ever, in the past few months unemployment has become a major factor in applications 
for benefits. It seems that this condition will worsen in the coming year. 

During 1970, thirty-two Andover veterans passed away: twelve World War One, 
eighteen World War Two, and two Korean Campaign. In each case, the survivors were 
contacted and assisted in filing for available benefits from the Veterans' Adminis- 
tration . 

Pension and compensation awards from the Veterans' Administration in 1970, 
when projected for a twelve-month period, were in the amount of $30,616.00 to Ando- 
ver residents. 



Board of Health 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

At present there are 52 people receiving Tubercularstatic chemotherapy. Pa- 
tients taking these drugs are able to continue their normal activities without fear 
of a breakdown of Tuberculosis. It also means that they avoid the necessity of 
being hospitalized and do not lose any time from work. This is a very good example 
of Public Health preventive medicine. The patients prefer this method of treatment^ 
and it is much less costly for the Town. 

Volunteer nurses and a volunteer dental hygienist provided a valuable health 
program in St. Augustine's School under the supervision and direction of our Public 
health Nurse. 

Another new Day Care Service for children has been licensed in Andover, making 
a total of seven nursery schools which are not operated as part of an organized ed- 
ucational system. 

CLINICS SPONSORED 

The following clinics were sponsored by the Board of Health in 1970: 

Vision Screening Program for children under five years of age was conducted by 
volunteers from the Andona Society. Two hundred twenty-one children were tested 
and nine were referred for more detailed examination. 

Rabies Clinic, conducted by Dr. Lindsay, was held on two successive Saturdays 
in April. Nine hundred four dogs were vaccinated. 

The following contagious diseases were reported to the Board of Health: 

1968 1969 1970 

Animal Bites 

Chickenpox 

Dysentery, Bacillary 

German Measles 

Gonorrhea 

Hepatitis, Infectious 

Measles 

Meningitis 

Mumps 

Salmonellosis 

Scarlet Fever 

Strep Throat 

Syphilis 

Tuberculosis 

Whooping Cough 

34 



102 


66 


89 


81 


59 


87 


2 





3 


5 


1 





3 


9 


4 


1 


4 


6 


2 





1 











75 


43 


172 





7 





3 


3 


17 








2 


1 


2 


1 





1 


3 












PERMITS AND LICENSES ISSUED 



1968 



1969 



1970 



Septic Tanks 

Milk 

Carrying Offal 

Day Care Services for Children 

Mfg. Frozen Desserts and/or Ice Cream Mix 

Oleo 

Camp 

Piggeries 

Massage 

Motel 

Pasteurization 

Swimming Pool 

Food Service Establishment 

Disposal Works Installers 

Disposal Works Installations & Repairs 

Horse Stabling 

Burial 

Funeral Directors 

Gas 

Plumbing 



99 


70 


63 


73 


70 


62 


20 


26 


26 


6 


7 


10 


6 


6 


4 


24 


29 


29 


2 


2 


2 


7 


6 


4 


4 


5 


5 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


2 


42 


55 


53 


65 


75 


70 


31 


25 


22 


120 


88 


93 


- 


11 


47 


93 


79 


53 


7 


6 


5 


211 


213 


190 


243 


191 


205 



Money Received 



$6,040 $5,270 $4,360 



ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION 



Complaints Investigated 

Approval of Sewage Disposal System Installations 
Rejections of Sewage Disposal System Installations 
Check Excavation and Fill for Sewage Disposal System 

Installations 
Subdivision Plans Submitted for Approval 
Restaurant Layouts Submitted for Approval 
Horse Stable Plans Submitted for Approval 
Food Handling Establishment Inspections 
Milk, Cream and Ice Cream Samples Analyzed 
Water Samples Analyzed 
Swab Tests 

Farm Labor Camp Inspections 
Swimming Pool Inspections 
Piggery Inspections 
Recreation Camp Inspections 
Stable Inspections 

Sanitarian's Office Consultations 
Sanitarian's Consultant Conferences 
Plumbing Inspections 
Gas Inspections 



57 


82 


87 


86 


66 


57 


13 


13 


11 


28 


32 


4 


9 


9 


14 


1 


5 


3 


- 


2 


8 


146 


136 


126 


90 


43 


56 


75 


14 


17 


17 


119 


177 


16 


5 


5 


29 


11 


8 


19 


9 


13 


3 


3 


2 


- 


- 


14 


- 


91 


124 


- 


- 


60 


515 


478 


450 


313 


334 


286 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 



Field Visits 
Office Visits 



151 
329 



170 
439 



150 
613 



INTERNATIONAL VACCINATION CERTIFICATES AUTHENTICATED 



671 



730 



BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS DISPENSED - # OF DOSES 



Diptheria and Tetanus Toxoids 
Diptheria, Tetanus and Pertussis 
Measles Vaccine 
Mumps Vaccine 
Rubella Vaccine 



1 


230 




903 


2 


892 


2 


,710 




810 




770 




24 




- 


1 


813 




500 



35 



BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS DISPENSED - # OF DOSES (Cont . ) 

1968 1969 1970 

Schick Outfits 

Smallpox Vaccine 

Tetanus Immune Globulin (human) (units) 

Tetanus and Diptheria Toxoids (adults) 

Tetanus Toxoids 

Tuberculin, Old 

P.P.D. 

Typhoid Vaccine 

Polio Vaccine 

Vaccination Needles 

Immune Serum Globulin 

DIAGNOSTIC TEST OUTFITS DISPENSES - # OF OUTFITS 

Tine Tests 
Throat Cultures 
T.B. Cultures 
Wassermann 
Enteric 
Gonorrhea 



2 


1 


1,969 


2,476 


2,250 


4,250 


1,360 


880 


1,340 


1,360 


680 


1,150 


500 


- 


200 


310 


3,840 


4,120 


1,500 


2,450 


992 


908 



1,700 


1,950 


720 


672 


6 


6 


924 


936 


12 


12 


- 


6 



Civil Defense 



As in past years, the most active groups of Civil Defense met at their regular 
times. The C. D. Groups spent some 2,500 hours of time in training and use in the 
past year. 

With the consent of the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen, the Director 
ran a simulated fallout shelter exercise. This provided the Town with about eighteen 
shelter managers. A "thank you" and a "well done" is in order to the following who 
made the exercise possible: Andover's Board of Selectmen, Town Manager J. Maynard 
Austin, American Red Cross, the Raytheon Company, Andover Auxiliary Police, Andover 
School Department, the Andover Co-op, Dana's Sport Shop, K. P. Thompson Co., Inc., 
the State Civil Defense Agency, and all those who stayed inside the simulated 
shelter for forty-eight hours . 

The Federal Government has granted monies to assist each community in coming up 
with a comprehensive plan for use of its shelters. One meeting has been held in 
Andover. The Director also attended several meetings of a group to form a disaster 
plan for the Greater Lawrence area and visited six classes of students at the East 
Junior High School to explain Civil Defense activities in Andover. 

In the next year it is hoped that with the townspeoples ' help the Civil Defense 
Center will be finished in accordance with a plan filed with the Federal Government. 



Weights and Measures 



During the period of January 1, 1970, through December 31, 1970, a total of 
18,365 items were inspected for proper labeling, weight, count, and volume content. 
Deficiencies in either weight or volume were found in 2,515 items, while 8,665 items 
were found to be correct, and 7,185 items were found to contain an amount in excess 
of declared quantity. During the year 51 complaints were received and investigated. 

The Department sealed 214 weighing and measuring devices, adjusted 22, attached 
NOT SEALED labels on 6 units, and CONDEMNED 1 device. 

Sealing fees for 1970 amounted to $338.20. Fees collected through December 31 
1970, amounted to $311.20 which have been paid to the Town Treasurer. 

36 



Recreation Department 



The first aim of the Recreation Department was to make available suitable a- 

reas and facilities, in Andover, for the leisure time needs of the people of An- 

dover. The second aim was to assist the people in taking full advantage of the a- 
reas and facilities provided. 

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES: 

BUILDINGS: There are three buildings that are specifically used for recrea- 
tional purposes. One is located on Center Street in Ballardvale. Another is lo- 
cated on Iceland Road in Shawsheen. The third is located in the Andover Recrea- 
tion Park on Abbot Street. In addition, there are seven other buildings that are 
used seasonally. 

Progress during the year was made in the building at Andover Recreation Park. 
The kitchen area was remodeled for better accomodation of those using the building 
for social meetings and outings. 

AREAS: There are some fifty acres of land that are specifically used for 
Recreation. It includes four playgrounds and two softball diamonds. There are 
two picnic areas, a sliding-coasting area and two court areas used for multi pur- 
poses. Much of the land is wooded. 

Three parcels of land were acquired by the Conservation Committee that adds 
to the potential of Recreation land. In the area of the Recreation Park, the 
Town acquired the Essex Sand and Gravel Pit along with the Foster land opposite 
the swimming area on Pomps Pond. In the area of the Shawsheen Playground, the 
Brox property on Lowell Street was also acquired. In all cases the Conservation 
Committee consulted the Recreation Department as to the use these parcels could be 
put. 

One of the most significant developments was the lighting of the softball 

field at the Recreation Park. Although the project was completed after the regu- 
lar softball season, two of the lights were used for football practice on several 
occasions . 

Toward the end of the year, an experiment was tried to develop additional 
skating rinks behind the Fire Station in West Andover and on the softball field at 
Andover Recreation Park. Through volunteer labor, the rink in West Andover was 
constructed and proved highly successful. The one at Recreation Park was less suc- 
cessful because of problems of snow removal. 

At the request of the Chairman of the Conservation Committee, the Department 
initiated the development of a canoe landing site on the Shawsheen River near Route 
93. Through volunteer help, the area was cleaned and the site make ready. 

WATER: Pomps Pond is located near the geographical center of Town and is six- 
teen acres in size. The primary use is for municipal swimming. 

During the year, two control dams were constructed around the swamp, directly 
south of the Pond. Water was also pumped into the Pond from the Town well in this 
area. Pumping of water from the well started during August. This accomplished 
two things. The water remained cooler and the level of the water remained more 
constant. 

ADDITIONAL FACILITIES: In order to comply with public demand, use was made of 
buildings and grounds of public, semi-public and private agencies. The Department 
was able to increase activities significantly through increased cooperation by the 
School Department. 

STAFF: 

FULL TIME: The most significant progress made by the Department during the 
year was directly attributable to employing two additional staff members. It 
marks the first time that the Recreation Director has had consistent help since 
the Department was established in 1962. 

An Assistant Recreation Director was employed in May. Through his efforts, 
it has been possible for the Department to initiate several new activities. It 
has also been possible to maintain closer contact with established activities. He 
has been an invaluable aid as liason between the Recreation Department and other 
Municipal Departments, checking details and in working with an expanded volunteer 
work force. 

An Office Assistant was employed toward the end of June. In addition to 

37 



secretarial work, she was a valuable asset through creative work in publicity, public 
relations, communications and scheduling. A significant increase in activity par- 
ticipation and volunteer service is directly attributable to competence and indus- 
try in this position. 

Although the last half of 1970 has produced the greatest increase in the pro- 
ductivity of the Department to date, the limited time during which the Staff has 
worked together has not allowed for peak performance. A thorough understanding 
and experience during all seasons is necessary to the effectiveness of all Staff 
members . 

SEASONAL: During two months of the year, there were forty employees on the 
payroll. This included personnel at Pomps Pond, five playgrounds, sports officials, 
one additional maintenance man and the Student Activity Center. New this year was 
the staff for a Special Education Program. 

The Student Activity Center is the only staff that is employed part time for 
entire year. 

VOLUNTEER: During ten months of the year, the Department is largely dependent 
on volunteers. Volunteers assisted in every phase of the program. There were 
twice the number of people who volunteered their services during the year as com- 
pared to 1969. This was primarily because of the staff available to help them or- 
ganize projects. 

RESEARCH AND PLANNING: 

This phase of the program is always far more time consuming than the actual 
operation of an activity or development of a facility. Again, the new members of 
the staff were an invaluable aid in obtaining the information necessary. 

During the year, the Director worked with two different consultants and sev- 
eral committees for the development of projects. 

One of the main projects was the development of plans for future expanded use 
of the Recreation Park. Working with a committee appointed by the Planning- Board, 
the Director aided in the completion of one plan and saw another almost completed 
by the end of the year. 

There was other planning for two teen Drop-in Centers ami several facilities. 
These included a lighted softball field, two skating rinks, additional tennis fac- 
ilities and a picnic area. 

MAINTENANCE: 

There was one part time maintenance man employed by the Department during the 
Summer. This man spent most of his time working with the Park Department in return 
for the work they did in maintaining grounds for the Recreation Department. 

The majority of maintenance work was done in one of five ways. The Director 
or Assistant Director had to make special arrangements with the Department of Pub- 
lic Works for each individual project. The Director or Assistant Director had to 
locate volunteers and plan projects in such a way as to meet the individual needs 
of the volunteers obtained. Private contractors had to be contacted and schedules 
arranged to suit the schedule of the person contacted. The Assistant Director or 
Director had to perform the maintenance job. During the Summer, activity personnel 
had to be taken away from their assigned jobs to perform maintenance duties. 

Each of these methods proved highly unsatisfactory in getting work done quick- 
ly and efficiently. Many of the activities suffered because manpower could not be 
obtained to meet deadlines in the activity schedules. Participants and leadership 
was lost for this reason. Equipment, in need of repair, was stored out of service 
and its use lost to the program because no one was available to return it to a us- 
able condition. 

Adequate maintenance assistance has been a problem to the Department through- 
out the year as it has in past years. Although request has been made for the funds 
to correct this condition for some years, maintenance has consistantly been cut 
from the Recreation Budget in reviews before the Town Meeting. The Department has 
been unable to correct this situation and act upon the hundreds of complaints and 
requests by the citizens of Andover. 

ACTIVITIES: 

There were seven programs that came under the direct control of the Department. 
One was the swimming program at Pomps Pond. A second was the Playground program 
held in five locations throughout the Town. A third was the Student Activity 

38 



Center which operated at the High School and for part of the year, the Drop-in Center 
at the Fire Station and the Ballardvale Community Center. A fourth was a program 
for Special children held at the Andover Recreation Park during the Summer. A 
fifth was a Basketball Clinic held in the Bancroft School utilizing members of the 
High School Varsity Basketball Team. A sixth was a Children's Movie Program held 
in the Doherty School. A seventh was a gym program for men held at the West Junior 
High School. 

It was possible to initiate additional programs this year, only because of the 
aid of the full time staff. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS: 

The Recreation Department works closely with many clubs and organizations dur- 
ing the year. Perhaps the biggest project was the work done on the Independence 
Day Celebration under the leadership of the Andover Service Club. Another project 
of some note was the installation of lights on the softball field at the Andover 
Recreation Park. This project was spearheaded by the Andover Softball League who 
introduced a special article for this at the Town Meeting. In addition to this 
money, they paid for some of the expenses from their treasury and provided volun- 
teer labor. 

The one most important advance in public relations during the year was the 
additional coverage of the office made possible by the full time staff. Those 
clubs and organizations wishing assistance were able to make the contact with the 
Department at the time they desired. This led to a greatly increased interest in 
the Department as a resource and produced more volunteer aid than ever before in 
the history of the Department. 

Another development, made possible by the full time staff, was far superior 
newspaper coverage of recreational developments. In addition it was possible to 
produce flyers, instruction sheets, a bulletin board in the Town Hall and spot an- 
nouncements for the local radio station. 

The Department was able to more than triple its service to the clubs, organ- 
izations and individuals during the second half of the year. 

COORDINATION: 

Coordinating the efforts of two or more groups or individuals is an exacting 
and time consuming job. This is one of the services that the Department engaged 
in almost continuously during the year. 

Arranging for one activity to operate without physical interference from a- 
nother is one aspect of coordination. In order to render an equitable decision, 
the needs of all involved must be considered. Biased or arbetrary decisions can 
destroy good public relations and create lasting hostilities. During the Summer, 
it was necessary to coordinate the swimming program of four separate groups at the 
Pomps swimming area. These included a program operated by the Girl Scouts, School 
Department, the Special Education Program and the program for public normally held 
in the area. During the winter there was the conflict concerning the ice time 
that should be alloted recreational skating as opposed to those interested in hock- 
ey. These are but two examples of the many scheduling problems solved by the De- 
partment. 

In order that volunteers be encouraged to aid in maintenance projects, arrange- 
ments must be made that enable phases of the projects to proceed in logical se- 
quence. During the Autumn, volunteers were recruited to dig trenches for electric 
cable at the Recreation Park. One thousand feet of trench had to be dug, eighteen 
inches deep. Arrangements had to be made for some power equipment, tools and one 
person with the technical knowledge as to where the trenches were to be dug. The 
same process of coordination had to be repeated with the two new skating rinks that 
were prepared this year. 

Coordinating programs so that similar ones will not compete for the same par- 
ticipants is always a consideration that must be made. Perhaps the most widely 
publicized example of this was the scheduling of a privately operated dance that 
was to be held on Town property in competition with a Recreation dance operated by 
the Student Activity Center. Another example would be the coordinated effort be- 
tween the Recreation Department and the South School P.T.O. to provide a continu- 
ing movie program for children throughout the Winter months. 

The coordination of one operation to comDliment another is an effort to in- 
crease participation. During the Summer the bus schedules were prepared in such 
a way that playground children can use the service as well as those going to Pomps 

39 



Pond. A basketball clinic, held in the Fall, was scheduled in such a way as to 
stimulate interest for the Church Basketball League program as well as the Y.M.C.A. 
Basketball Program. This clinic was designed to end just as the regular basketball 
season was beginning. 

Maintenance in preparation for activities must be coordinated to allow activ- 
ities to start under workable conditions. Preparation of the Swimming area must 
be started early enough for the job to be completed yet late enough to minimize 
vandalism during the time the area is unsupervised by the swimming staff. Prepar- 
ation of skating rinks must be done late enough that it will not interfere with 
Fall activities yet before the arrival of freezing weather and snow. 

Coordination is the ability to know what to do and when to do it so that the 
various programs will operate with maximum effectiveness. 

EVALUATION: 

The Department continously must evaluate means by which to better and more 
effectively serve the Town. 

It was through evaluation of specific needs that the movie program for chil- 
dren was started. The Summer Program for Special Education Children was also in- 
itiated when it was brought to the attention of the Director that another local 
program has been discontinued. 

Evaluation of facilities prompted improvements to Pomps Pond, the Lodge in 
Andover Recreation Park and the purchase of play and picnic equipment for the 
Pomps Pond beach area which will be completed in the Spring. 

It was through a critical program analysis that the Drop-in Center project 
was started. This was an attempt to provide a service to teens in an area where 
teens tend to congregate. 

Through an evaluation of general service offered to the Town by the Department 
two projects were started. One was the publishing of a directory of organizations 
in Andover. The other was the Recreation Bulletin Board found in the lobby of 
Town Hall . 

Recreation cannot afford to be a static operation. Only through constant e- 
valuation can the changing needs of the citizens of Andover be met. 



Memorial Hall Library 



Having completed our 97th year of service to the Town of Andover, Memorial 
Hall Library continues with confidence in its ability to offer the same high stan- 
dard of public service which has become a tradition in the Merrimack Valley area. 
As one of the outstanding public libraries in the Commonwealth, this institution 
will hold fast to those principles which have earned the library high regard, while 
it continues to develop new programs and services to meet tomorrow's public needs. 

The year 1970 has seen many significant changes in both personnel and programs 
at Memorial Hall Library. This institution has attempted to continue the expansion 
of programs and service started some years ago when the library first became a sub- 
regional center for Essex County. 

NEW SERVICES 

In an effort to alleviate some problems caused by a complete lack of parking 
facilities during the day, we have extended the Children's Room hours to 9 o'clock 
with the hope that entire families will come to use the library during the evening 
hours . 

For six weeks during the summer vacation the library sponsored a Summer Film 
Program for Children. The films shown were Kidnapped, Johnny Tremain, Hans Chris- 
tian Anderson, Captains Courageous, Tom Thumb, The African Lion, and Nature's 
Strangest Creatures. The entire program was received enthusiastically. We are 
mow engaged in setting up a film program for senior citizens. These showings will 
take place in the Andover Baptist Church. 

As in the past the print collection has been enlarged. In all, twenty-three 
were purchased, including five reproductions of works by Andrew Wyeth. To add a 
new dimension to our circulating art collection, five small replicas of famous 

40 



pieces of sculpture were purchased. They are HEAD OF COCO by Pierre-August Renoir; 
LA PETITE PARISIENNE by Paul Gauguin; THE KISS by Auguste Rodin, STATUETTE OF A 
CAT; original is of bronze, Egyptian, Saite period (XXIV dynasty, 663-525 B.C.); 
and HORSE — Greek, about 470 B.C. 

With the increased popularity of language courses on records we have also ac- 
quired cassettes in French, German, Italian and Spanish and two Cassette Players 
that may also be borrowed. 

National Library Week and Earth Day brought us a keener awareness of the en- 
vironmental problems facing all of us. In order to do our part to see that the 
citizens of Andover are well informed we have started a Natural Resource center us- 
ing a clipping service from Boston Environment, Inc, which is headed by Mr. John 
Putnam. Boston Environment, Inc. has an Environmental Information Center at the 
State Library in the State House from which this clipping service emanates. Other 
activities during National Library Week were guided tours by members of local gar- 
den clubs through A.V.I.S. and Andover Conservation Commission reservations, the 
donation of two conservation maps by the Andover Chamber of Commerce, and ecology 
posters created by children in the elementary grades of Andover Schools. To further 
publicize our growing concern in ecology a photography contest was sponsored in con- 
junction with Phillips Academy and the Andover Jr. and Sr. High Schools with a 
prize to the most thought-provoking graphic example of local pollution or misuse of 
natural resources. 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

There have been many important changes on the staff of the library. Among 
those of the staff who have left during this year are Miss Frances Ann Bold, Direc- 
tor; Mr. Ronald B. Hubbs, Assistant Director; Miss Elizabeth Russell, Head of Chil- 
dren's Services; Mrs. Peter Hadley, Technical Processing. Also, we have lost a few 
part-time people from the Children's Room and Circulation Desk, Mrs. Olive Tardiff 
and Mrs. H.H. Gifford and Mrs. Ernest Turton, the Inter-Library Loan Librarian. 

The year 1970 also saw many additions to the Library Staff for replacements. 
Our new staff members are Mrs. Thomas Angeloro, Technical Processing; Mrs. Freder- 
ick Dalrymple, Mrs. Norma Chase, Miss Patricia DePetrillo, Mrs. George Moissides, 
and Mrs. Barbara Smith. Miss Anthea Minchom, a student from Manchester, Co. Durham, 
England, was also a temporary addition to the staff. This summer she worked here 
for four weeks as part of her practical experience in library work. 

The Trustees of the library were pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. 
Harry Sagris as the new Director of Memorial Hall Library, effective January 18, 
1971. Mr. Sagris was formerly Director of the Ipswich Public Library. 

To acquaint the townspeople with our old and new staff members a biographical 
sketch is appearing weekly in the Townsman. 

OTHER IMPROVEMENTS 

Some improvements to the building were made. Plans were finalized recently 
for the removal and replacement of the glass floor on the second level in the old 
book stacks. 

During the past year we have been fortunate to have on display many unusual 
collections and handicrafts graciously loaned to us by Andover residents. These 
displays have brought many favorable comments, and we look forward to bringing you 
more in the future. 

Our thanks to the Andover Garden Club, Four Seasons Garden Club, Spade and 
Trowel Garden Club and Village Garden Club for the lovely flower arrangements last 
year, and we look forward to seeing their new creations for 1971. Their efforts 
have brought many favorable comments and added a special touch to the Circulation 
Desk these past few months. 



41 



REGIONAL SERVICES 

The library continues to provide regional service to a twenty-four town area of 
Essex County, under the provisions of the regional plan of service adopted some 
years ago. These services include inter-library loan, back-up reference service, 
in-service training and professional consultation for local libraries. 

Recently our new inter-library loan librarian, Mrs. Paul Schaake, received a 
request for a rather rare book. Before she exhausted all avenues, she had been in 
contact with the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. and the Free Library of 
Philadelphia. 

With State Funds we were able to establish small three-month deposits of Large 
Print books to the libraries we serve. A screen purchased with Eastern Regional 
funds will be used by our member libraries to help them plan special programs in the 
future. 

We are also pleased that over the past four months statistics show we have been 
able to fill 50% of our inter-library loan requests from our own shelves by pur- 
chasing more books for the regional collection. 

FURTHER SERVICES 

In keeping with the library's reputation as a pace-setter in public service pro- 
grams, a number of innovations will be added during the forthcoming year. We have 
taken an unprecedented step for a public library and eliminated the fine system and 
to complement this system we are offering an automatic renewal of books for an ad- 
ditional three weeks and hope that this will offer additional service to our patrons, 

By holding fast to what has proven to be worthwhile, and continuing to move a- 
head in developing innovative programs for the future, SERVICE will become the by- 
word in Memorial Hall Library. We welcome all who wish to use our facilities and 
look forward to serving each of you in the near future. 

LIBRARY STATISTICS 



1970 
REGISTRATION OF BORROWERS (1.) 2,711 

BOOK STOCK AND USE 

Vols, at end of reporting year 71,996 

Vols, added 5,794 

Vols, withdrawn 938 

Vols, circulated 136,090 

(incl. periodicals & pamphlets) 

PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS 

Subscriptions 

Gifts 

AUDIO- VISUAL 
Framed Reproductions 
Records 



It 

1969 
3,484 


Juvenile 
1970 1969 
794 974 


T 
1970 
3,505 


otal 

1969 
4,458 


66,202 


21,435 


20,554 


93,431 


86,756 


5,912 


881 


1,462 


6,675 


7,374 


1,118 


543 


1,233 


1,481 


2,351 


41,681 


74,491 


86,950 


210,581 


228,631 



299 299 


15 15 


314 314 


42 37 


— 


42 37 


Owned at end of 


Added 


Circulated 


reporting year 


during year 


during year 


154 


23 


640 


2,445 


490 


9,105 



42 



Slides, filmstrips 
Microfilm (reels) 
Films (reels) 



304 

2,580 

15 



GRAND TOTAL CIRCULATION: 222,435 (3.) 
INTER-LIBRARY LOAN 1970 

Books borrowed from other libraries 

Books loaned to other libraries 
ACTIVITY GROUPS 

Story Hours 

Pre-school Programs 

School Class Visits 
PERSONNEL 

Total Budget 

Personal Services 

Personnel as percent of total 
Budget 

Full-time Personnel 

Part-time Personnel 

Total Personnel 
PER CAPITA (based on 1965 census, 20,551 population) 

1970 
BOOK STOCK 4.5 

CIRCULATION OF BOOKS 10.24 



12 

548 
2 



1969 



293 


328 


1,480 


1,377 


1970 


1969 


24 


41 


63 


47 


14 


26 


1970 


1969 


$246,000 


$216,000 


$160,000 


$140,000 


65% 


65% 


16 


15 


34 


31 


50 


46 



1969 
4.2 
11.12 



640 



211 (2.) 



(1) Active Registered Borrowers total 16,213. The library began a complete 
re-registration of all borrowers in June 1968. Since cards are issued 
for a three-year period, the registration figures will not present a 
true picture until June 1971. 

(2) The 211 films circulated were shown 457 times to 293 groups with a 
viewing audience of 27,471. 

(3) Statistics for the library's Ballardvale Branch are included in the 
general figures. The branch is open 10 hours per week, has an es- 
timated total book stock of 5,000. In 1970 the total circulation of 
7,513 included 3,531 Adult, 3,936 Juvenile, and 46 Records. 



43 



Parks 



The Park Division maintains 26 playing fields, 3 acres of playgrounds, over 100 
acres of playing and grass areas within the school system, 19 Town grass plots and 
over 6 acres of park land, 6 acres of grass areas adjacent to other town facilities. 
This Division also assists the Recreation Department with the maintenance of the 
tennis courts. 

The maintenance program consists of seeding, fertilizing, rolling, mowing, trim- 
ming, raking watering, sweeping all of the grass areas, repair and marking the play- 
ing fields for all school and Little League games and the erecting and repairing of 
bleachers. 

The portable bleachers were loaned to North Andover for the Thanksgiving Day 
game with Andover High and this Division assisted North Andover in the assembling 
and disassembling of these bleachers. 

The Park Division removes rubbish at least three times each week from all the 
containers on the streets around the Town, the Town Hall, Safety Center, Recreation 
Park, Shawsheen Square, Town Yard, Burnham Road and the Playgrounds, throughout the 
summer. 

The Park men return to the Highway Division for the winter months. 

The following is a list of areas maintained by the Park Division: 

PLAYING FIELDS - total 26 



Football (3) 

High School 2 
Playstead l 



Baseball (3) 
High School 
Playstead 



Tracks (2) 

High School 1 

Playstead l 

Little League(lO) 

Sanborn 2 

Playstead 3 

South School 3 

West School 2 



Girls Hockey (3) 

High School 2 

East Jr. High 1 

Softball(4) 

Recreation Park 1 

High School 2 

Playstead 1 



Soccer(l) 

High School 1 

PLAYGROUND AREAS - total 3 acres 



Ballardvale 
Indian Ridge 
Richardson School 



1 Acre 
1 Acre 
1 Acre 



SCHOOL PLAYGROUNDS AND GRASS AREAS - total 124 Acres 

Bancroft 15 Acres 

High & West Jr. High 40 Acres 

Sanborn 15 Acres 

Shawsheen 2 Acres 

East Jr. High x , „ . 

^ a. i m a. j) 17 Acres 

Central Playstead' 

South Elementary 20 Acres 

West Elementary 15 Acres 



44 



TOWN GRASS PLOTS - total 19 



Elm and Main Street 

Municipal Parking Lots - 2 

Essex Street and Railroad Station 

Main and Stevens Street 

High Street and Burnham 

Summer and Upland Road 

Main Street and Hidden Road 

Hidden Road and Porter Road 

Ballardvale Center Library 

Andover Street and Dascomb Road 

Beacon Street and Lowell Street 

Shawsheen Square 

Central and School Street 

Stevens Street and Shawsheen Road 

Walker Avenue 

Corbett Street 

Safety Center 

Town Yard 



PARK LANDS - total 6 1/4 Acres 



Central Park 4 Acres 

Shawsheen Park 1 1/2 Acre 

West Andover Community Center 3/4 Acre 



OTHER TOWN LAND - 6 Acres 



Bancroft Reservoir 4 Acres 

Fish Brook Pumping Station 2 Acres 



Forestry 



In 1970 a consolidation of three divisions, Tree, Insect Pest Control and Dutch 
Elm Disease, resulted in the creation of the Forestry Division whose responsibili- 
ties include planting, maintenance and preservation of Andover' s public shade trees. 
Pruning, spraying, planting, cabling, roadside brush control and tree removal are 
some of the duties involved. 

Dutch Elm disease was diagnosed in 48 Elms this year. These infected trees 
were cut down and disposed of at the landfill site. A number of dead and dangerous 
trees over utility wires were removed by joint effort of the New England Telephone 
and Telegraph Company and the Massachusetts Electic Company and Andover T s Forestry 
Division. Assistance was received from the Massachusetts Department of Natural Re- 
sources in locating, sampling and removing some diseased trees. 

The shade tree spray program, designed to protect public shade trees from in- 
sects and diseases, was carried out using State and Federal approved pesticides and 
application methods. Several toxic spray materials were removed from public use in 
1970 by the State Pesticide Board including DDT, DDE, aldrin, deildrin, endrin tox- 
aphene and heptachlor. Spraying was performed to control elm leaf beetles, elm bark 
beetles, willow leaf beetles, linden and maple aphids, fall webworms and oak leaf 
skeletonizers. A heavy infestation of oak leaf skeletonizers was present in Eastern 
Massachusetts for the past two years, and approved and recommended pesticides appear- 
ed to have little effect on these troublesome insects. 

A diversified tree planting program was continued during the planting season 
with 150 trees being set out and maintained. Several species of deciduous and orn- 
amental trees were used including several varieties of maples, lindens, sycamores, 
Buisman elms, which are resistant to elm diseases, flowering crabapples, plums and 
cherries. All newly planted trees and shrubs were fertilized, mulched and watered 
during the summer. 

Routine tree work performed includes low limb removal, pruning, dead and dan- 
gerous tree removal, bark tracing damaged trunk areas, cabling weak trees, watering 
and fertilizing young trees. Supervision and inspection of wire clearing work was 
continued and new overhead and underground construction gone over in detail with 

45 



utility engineers and arborists. Underground installations present problems to both 
utility companies and the Forestry Division where trees are present since excessive 
root cutting and trunk damage during conduit or cable laying damages trees permanent- 
ly and renders them unsafe in windstorms. Continued control of roadside brush and 
poison ivy by chemical spraying was carried out along streets and at recreation a- 
reas. 

Continued ground and air pollution is weakening and killing roadside trees. De- 
cline and death of many trees has been prevalent for the past ten years and during 
1970 over 65 trees died or deteriorated to a point where removal was necessary. Fac- 
tors which adversely affect plant and tree growth include lack of moisture, ^as 
leaks, hottop close to trees, root cutting and atmosphere pollution. 

Forestry Department personnel worked during all snowstorms operating trucks and 
sidewalk plows. 

Engineering 

The following projects were completed by this Division during 1970. 

SANITARY SEWERS: 

Construction plans and specifications were prepared for bidding and field lay- 
out and on site inspection was provided for the installation of 1,900 lineal feet of 
8 inch sewer in Wild Rose Drive. The final construction cost for this project was 
$31,800. 

STORM DRAINS: 

Construction plans and specifications were prepared for bidding and field lay- 
out and on site inspection was provided for the following: 

630 In. ft. of 12,15, 21 & 24 inch drains in Bancroft Road 

500 In. ft. of 12, 15, & 18 inch drains in Highland Road 

620 In. ft. of 12, 15 & 18 inch drains in. High Plain Road 

675 In. ft. of 12, 15, 18 & 24 inch drains in Holt Road 

700 In. ft. of 12 & 15 inch drains in Stinson Road 

230 In. ft. of 12 & 15 inch drains in Wildwood Road 

Plans were completed and field layout was provided for the following drains in- 
stalled by the Highway Division. 

160 In. ft. of 12 inch drain in Ballardvale Road 

800 In. ft. of 12 inch drain in Osgood Street 

400 In. ft. of 12 inch drain in Bellevue Road and Tessier Drive 
40 In. ft. of 36 inch drain in Rattlesnake Hill Road 

The final construction cost for storm drains was $55,000. 

SCHOOL FACILITIES: 

Construction plans and specifications were prepared for bidding and field lay- 
out and on site inspection was provided for the following facilities; 

1. Playing field at the Shawsheen School - $ 9,500. 

2. Three additional rooms at Shawsheen School $10,000. 

3. A complete field survey and plan was prepared for additional land taking at 
the South School. 

SIDEWALKS: 

Construction plans and specification were prepared for 700 lineal feet of side- 
walk on Holt Road. The construction began during 1970 and will be completed in 1971. 
The low bid was $5,000. 

CONSERVATION AND RECREATION: 

1. The Pomps Pond dams and water control structures were built according to a 
report from the United States Soil Conservation Service. This Division provided 
field surveys and supervision of construction. The total cost for this project was 
$8,500. 

2. Specifications for bidding were prepared for a new fence at the Ballardvale 
Playground at a construction cost of $1,850. 



46 



FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

1. The fire alarm duct and cable for the new Fire Station was completed under 
our supervision at a construction cost of $1,700. 

2. Construction plans and specifications were prepared for alterations to the 
Ballardvale Fire Station. These alterations are underway at the present time. The 
low bid was $7,750. 

LIBRARY: 

Construction plans and specifications were prepared for bidding on the replace- 
ment of the glass floor in the book stack area of the Memorial Hall Library at a to- 
tal construction cost of $3,000. 

LANDFILL: 

A topographical survey and plan was prepared of the existing landfill site, and 
a study of future capacity was made along with studies of other possible sites, for 
the Landfill Site Selection Committee. 

DEMOLITION: 

Specifications and supervision was provided for the demolition of the former 
Hurley property on Bartlett Street, Giles property on River Street and the Central 
Fire Station. The demolition cost of these three buildings was $9,400. 

PLANNING BOARD: 

Plans for 11 new subdivisions of land, 3 still in preliminary form and 8 in de- 
finitive form, totaling 328 lots, were reviewed for the Planning Board to determine 
conformance with its rules and regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the pro- 
posed utilities. During the year 5.38 miles of roadway and utilities in 15 differ- 
ent subdivisions were inspected. These roadways represented over a million dollars 
in construction cost. 

MISCELLANEOUS: 

1. Plans and specifications were prepared and the construction was supervised 
for the drainage repairs to the Town Hall. Construction cost for these repairs was 
$1,650. 

2. Measurements were made of the High School gym floor and on the sewer line 
at the additions to the West Elementary School for the settlement of disagreements 
with the contractors. 

3. Easement and betterment plans were prepared where applicable for the con- 
struction project outlined above. 

4. The Town was represented in all engineering matters with the County and 
State governments, principally concerning reconstruction of Andover Street and the 
new intersection of Interstate 93 and Lowell Street. 

5. Many plans, drawings, and sketches were prepared for the Selectmen, Town 
Manager and various Town Departments and Boards. 

6. Numerous Town citizens were assisted in obtaining information about exist- 
ing Town utilities, Street layouts and other general information. 

7. This Division assisted in providing Street opening permits for underground 
utilities. 

8. The engineering records of the Town were maintained and other Town depart- 
ments aided in obtaining such information. 

One new permanent man was added to the staff in April, making a total of two. 
Two students were employed during the summer months. The above 1970 construction 
programs, where engineering services were provided, amounts to $1,145,150. 



Highways 



RESURFACING: 

During the year 1970, some 24 miles of roads were treated with MC3-Asphalt and 
sand as well as being honed. The following streets were resurfaced by the above 
method: Alderbrook Road, Bailey Road, Beacon Street, Bellevue Road, Birch Road, Bos- 
ton Road, Brookfield Road, Brundrett Avenue, Bannister Road, Cedar Road, Chandler 
Road, Cheever Circle, Clark Road, Coolidge Road, County Road, Cross Street, Dumbar- 
ton Street, Landfill Area, Fiske Street, Forbes Lane, Holt Road, Judson Road, 

47 



Juliette Street, Karlton Circle, Kirkland Drive, Lincoln Street, Linda Road, Ledge Road, 
McKenny Circle, Moreland Road, Orchard Street, Oriole Drive, Osgood Street, Pine- 
crest Road, Pleasant Street, Princeton Avenue, Rattlesnake Hill Road, Reservation 
Road, Robandy Road, Rockridge Road, Rocky Hill Road, Prospect Road, Salem Street, 
Suncrest Road, Thresher Road, Webster Street, West Parish Drive, Wildwood Road. A 
total of 90,000 gallons of asphalt was used. 

The following streets were resurfaced with a layer of type 1 bituminous con- 
crete. Lowell Street from Cutler Road to Route 93 and from the Tewksbury Town Line, 
east 1,200 feet, Stratford Road, Memorial Circle, Summer Street from Upland to Ste- 
vens Street and 2,600 feet of Osgood Street, for a total of 6 miles. 

SIDEWALKS: 

Sidewalks were constructed of type D-13 bituminous concrete: Pine Street, Mor- 
ton Street, from Main Street to Stratford Road, and a section of Tewksbury Street. 
Some of the cement slabs in Shawsheen Village were repaired with bituminous concrete. 

DRAINAGE: 

The following projects were constructed in 1970: 
160 In. ft. of 12 inch storm drain - Ballardvale Road 
800 In. ft. of 12 inch storm drain - Osgood Street 

400 In. ft. of 12 inch storm drain - Bellevue Road & Tessier Drive 
40 In. ft. of 36 inch storm drain - Rattlesnake Hill Road 
40 In. ft. of 30 inch storm drain - Chestnut Street 
Existing catch basins and drains were cleaned and repaired along with 350 feet 
of Rogers Brook and other minor brooks. 

HIGHWAY SAFETY: 

Concrete posts were replaced on Lowell Street, Canterbury Street and River Road. 

CLEAN UP: 

During the Spring and Summer two sweepers are kept busy cleaning the streets 
after the Winter sanding and in the Fall the leaves are removed from all Town 
Streets . 

SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 

This Division was in charge of snow removal and sanding. The snowfall for the 
year was as follows: 

January 5.25 inches 

February 12.75 " 

March 17.5 

December 29.75 " 

Total 1970 65.25 inches 

BRIDGES: 

Bridges under control of the Highway Division, e.g. Stevens Street, Andover 
Street, and Central Street, were inspected several times during the year. Minor re- 
pairs were made to the Central Street bridge during the year. 



Water Department 



MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS: 

The major improvements to the water system in 1970 were as follows: 

1. Abbott Well - Installed a rebuilt pump and motor. 

2. Haggetts Pond Pumping Station - Installed a rebuilt pump, motor, chemical 
feed system and appurtenances. 

3. Painted the Wood Hill distribution storage tank reservoir. 

4. Completed installation of 3,970 lineal feet of 24 inch water main in Osgood 
Street and through easements to Haggetts Pond Pumping Station. This is the first 
step in the installation of a new transmission main between Haggetts Pond and Ban- 
croft storage reservoir. 

5. Extensive repairs were made at the Fish Brook Pumping Station because of 
damage done by a chlorine leak. 

48 



6. Major relocations of existing water mains crossing Interstate 93 at Lowell 
Street were made due to the additional ramp construction. 



WATER CONSUMPTION: 

1970 was another year for record consumption. The total water pumped to the 
system was 1,098,520,000 gallons. The average daily pumping was 3.08 million gal- 
lons and the maximum pumped in a single day was 5.4 million gallons. 

Early in the Fall, Haggetts Pond was drawn down over six feet and for several 
days, during heavy use, the pumping station was operated 24 hours a day. The above 
facts indicate the need of immediate construction of the proposed treatment plant at 
Haggetts Pond. If we experience a year with a minor reduction in rainfall before 
the treatment plant is constructed, extremely severe restrictions will have to be en- 
forced. 
ADDITIONS TO THE WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM: 

Azalea Circle: 650 ft. of 6" water main, 1 hydrant, 1 gate valve 

of 8" water main, 1 hydrant, 2 gate valves 
of 6" water main, 1 hydrant, 2 gate valves 
of 8" water main, 3 



737 ft 
519 ft 
1,558 ft 



Forest Hill Drive 
Mulberry Circle: 
Hanson Road: 
Chaise Circle 

& 
Landau Lane 
Candlewood Drive: 1,238 ft 
Lansbury Lane: 
Cardinal Lane: 



hydrants, 3 gate valves 
455 ft. of 6" water main, 1 hydrant, 6 gate valves 



307 ft, 
902 ft. 



Enfield Drive: 
Millstone Circle 
Temple Place: 
Ballardvale Well 

to 
Pomps Pond 



583 ft. 
902 ft. 
450 ft. 
240 ft. 



of 8" water main, 3 

of 6" water main, 1 

of 8" water main, 2 

of 6" water main, 4 

of 8" water main, 2 

of 6" water main, 1 

of 6" water main, 1 



500 ft. of 6" water main, 1 



hydrants, 2 gate valves 
hydrant, 5 gate valves 
hydrant, 1 gate valves 
gate valves 

hydrants, 2 gate valves 
hydrant, 4 gate valves 
hydrant, 2 gate valves 

gate valve 



WATER SERVICES: 

New main connections - 4 

6 inch off Chandler Road 

6 inch off Ballardvlle Road 

6 inch off Dascomb Road 

8 inch off Dascomb Road 

Connections for water services - 85 

Water service completed - 154 



WATER METERS: 



New meters installed - 200 
Outside registers installed - 30 
Meters repaired & reinstalled - 90 
Field meters serviced (Spring & Fall) 



- 20 



MAINTENANCE: 

1. Repaired main breaks 
Repaired service leaks 
Replaced old services 
Repaired hydrants 
Replaced hydrants 
Replaced shut-off valves 



25 
185 
185 
32 
12 
35 



2. Gate boxes raised for road resurfacing program. 

3. Maintained general maintenance program of painting and marking of hydrants, 
testing of gate valves, flushing dirty water mains and testing and chlorination of 
new water mains. 

4. Due to the lowered level of Haggetts Pond, it was not possible to flush the 
entire distribution system as planned. This now will be scheduled during the Spring 
of 1971. 



49 



Spring Grove Cemetery 



Spring Grove Cemetery contains about 60 acres, approximately 14 acres of which 
are undeveloped. The cemetery has been planned and developed to retain its natural 
beauty. It has a fine collection of trees and shrubs which are in bloom from early 
May until late September. Lots are available to meet all requirements. 

There were 45 lots sold in 1970 and 93 interments . From the perpetual care 
payments on these 45 lots and from three lotholders placing their lots under perpet- 
ual care a total of $5,970 was added to the Perpetual Care Fund. This fund now 
totals $186,142.27, and income from this fund is used to reduce the operating costs 
of the cemetery. This year's income was approximately $10,000. 

A total of $10,222.07 was received from the sale of new lots, interments, 
vault sales, foundation charges, flower rings, and for the care of lots not under 
perpetual care. 

The total cost to the Town to operate the cemetery was approximately $15,000. 

Sewers 

Major improvements to the sewer system in 1970 were as follows: 

1. The sewer force main (3,850 feet of 10-inch mains) that serves the new 
Raytheon plant was completed. 

2. Summer Street, Stratford Road, and Chestnut Street — 146 lineal feet 
of 12-inch sewer main, 818 lineal feet of 10-inch sewer main, and 
1,124 lineal feet of 8-inch sewer main were installed. 

3. Wild Rose Drive — 1,900 lineal feet of 8-inch sewer main was in- 
stalled . 

MAINTENANCE : 

1. Maintained and operated the Ballardvale Waste Water Treatment Plant. 

2. Maintained and operated the Riverina Road Waste Water Pumping Station. 

3. Manholes were raised for those roads resurfaced in 1970. 

4. Relieved 58 sewer main blocks and 222 sewer service blocks. 

5. Assisted the Highway Department in cleaning storm drains. 

GENERAL : 

Negotiations are underway with the City of Lawrence to connect the proposed 
sanitary sewer from the industrial area in West Andover to Lawrence's sewerage 
system. 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Commission has been active throughout 
the year. Necessary land acquisition has been made and final construction plans 
and specifications are underway for the proposed waste water treatment plant. This 
plant is scheduled to be operating in 1975. 



50 



Margaret G. Towle Fund 



Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long time resident of 
Andover , bequeathed the residue of her estate to tne Town of Andover , to be held and 
administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the Margaret G. 
Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from this fund be 
"devoted to the assistance or procurement of assistance for worthy persons residing 
in the Town of Andover wno may be in need of aid, comfort, or support on account of 
old age, disability, or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees chosen by the Town Man- 
ager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen. There is no provision for a full 
or even part-time social worker to search out needy cases, with the result that the 
entire case load comes through referrals from the Town Welfare Department, other 
private charitaDle groups, the Clergy and individuals. 

During 1970 the Trustees of the Towle Fund have met on a regular monthly Sched- 
ule and also at other unscheduled times and have discussed several cases, of which 
fourteen were voted for assistance. Fifty-eight vouchers were issued calling for 
the payment of $18,919.30 by the Town Treasurer, who has sole authority for the dis- 
bursement of funds. Total income for the year a .noun ted to $21,992.11. The balance 
of the fund at December 31, 1970, is $38,640.30. 



John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund 



On Hand, January 1, 1970 $2,517.65 

Received Thru Interest 261.92 $2,779.57 

Less Expenditures 175.98 

Balance on Hand, January 1, 1970 $2,603.59 

Money on Deposit as Follows: 

Andover Savings Bank Book #13259 Andover $1,000.00 

Essex-Broadway Savings Bank " #82865 Lawrence 2,000.00 

City Inst. Savings Bank " #69782 Lowell 1,000.00 

Central Savings Bank " #21760 Lowell 1 , 000 . 0Q 

Merrimack Valley Nat ' 1 . Bank - Checking Account 2, 603.59 



51 



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52 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
JURY LIST - JUNE 1970 



Adams, Helen W. 
Ainscow, George W. 
Allen, Charles F. 
Anderson, Carl N. 
Anderson, Mary L. 
Auchterlonie, Robert L 
Barnes, Marjorie 
Barraclough, Norman 
Barron, Thomas L. 
Barton, Joseph F. 
Batchelder, Harry A. 
Bayliss, Frank B. 
Beanland, John E. 
Bendroth, C. Harold 
Benson, Norman F. 
Bodge, Bernice D. 
Bolduc, Joseph R. 
Bramley, Edwin L. 
Brennan, John C. 
Brennan, Michael E. 
Broderick, Helen T. 
Bronson, Hugh J. 
Byrne, Beatrice M. 
Carmichael, James G. 
Caswell, Helen E. 
Caughey, Martin T. Jr. 
Chadwick, Alan G. 
Chadwick, Harry 
Clark, Wilbur T. 
Colpitts, Gertrude W. 
Cookson, Harold T. 
Cove, Joseph E. 
Crane, Virginia R. 
Cratty, Jeannine F. 
Cronin, Joseph A. 
Cushing, Richard H. 
Dake, Mary C. 
Dake , Roscoe E. 
Daly, P. Francis 
Daniels, Richard W. 
Dargoonian, Rosanna M. 
Davis, Geoffrey S. 
Denoncourt, William R. 
DesRoches, Robert F. 
Deyernond, Eileen A. 
Domingue, Robert P. 
Donahue, Frank W. 
Dowe, Richard J. 
Driscoll, Joseph G. 
Duke , John 
Dye, Thomas J. 
Earnshaw, Clarence 
Eastman, Weston D. 
Eddy, Charles B. Jr. 
Elder, Robert W. 
Fettes, Joan M. 
Fernandes, Anthony D. 



Housewife 

Section Chief 

Marketing Consultant 

Technical Writer 

Library Assistant 

Machinist 

Housewife 

Staff Assistant 

Gas Station Owner 

Operator 

Lineman 

Electrical Engineer 

Tax Examiner 

Retired 

Prod. Supervisor 

Homemaker 

Postal Clerk 

Retired 

Salesman 

Letter Carrier 

Insurance Clerk 

Sales Manager 

A t Home 

Manager 

Thrift Shop Manager 

Builder 

Asst. Superintendent 

Retired 

Bank Guard 

Housewife 

Electronic Distributor 

Retired 

At Home 

Housewife 

Stationary Fireman 

Maintenance Electrician 

Housewife 

Retired 

Part-time Clerk 

Electrical Engineer 

Housewife 

Purchasing Manager 

Department Chief 

Vice Pres. & Asst. Treas . 

Housewife 

Foreman 

Refrigeration 

Manager 

Pressman 

Machinist 

Shoe Last Manufacturer 

Admin. Assistant 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Retired 

Manager 

Insurance Clerk 

Department Head 



30 Pasho Street 
59 Love joy Road 

13 Geneva Road 

14 Fleming Avenue 

26 Morton Street 

21 Hall Avenue 

6 Carisbrooke Street 

16 Arcadia Road 
430 Lowell Street 

34 Florence Street 
32 Foster Pond Road 

35 Washington Avenue 
120 North Main Street 

17 High Street 
6 Westwind Road 

4 Henderson Avenue 

14 Brechin Terrace 

15 Appletree Lane 
30 Fox Hill Road 
12 Brook Street 
37 Enmore Street 
15 Gleason Street 

19 Canterbury Street 
59 Whittier Street 

5 Dumbarton Street 

102 Cross Street 
178 Holt Road 
160 Lowell Street 

6 Liberty Street 

7 Oak Street 
197 River Road 

15 Rock Ridge Road 

7 Argyle Street 
139 Chestnut Street 
23 Center Street 

10 Dufton Road 

27 Bancroft Road 
27 Bancroft Road 
15 Cuba Street 

4 Mitton Circle 

23 Blanchard Street 

8 Dumbarton Street 

11 Marion Avenue 

103 Reservation Road 
64 Andover Street 

51 Walnut Avenue 
35 River Road 
39 High Street 

24 Juliette Street 

9 River Street 

22 Central Street 
287 North Main Street 

18 Argyle Street 
81 Elm Street 

68 Lovejoy Road 

5 Buxton Court 

5 Glen Meadow Road 



53 



Ferrier, Robert L. 
Ferris, Virginia C. 
Fiedler, Wallace C. 
Fitzgerald, Jeremiah J. 
Fleming, David A., Jr. 
Forbes, Elizabeth W. 
Fox, Pauline B. 
Fraser, Ellen F. 
Fredrickson, Robert A. 
Fredrickson, Bertha E. 
Garrison, Jedediah L. 
Gaunt, Charles S. 
Gerraughty, James V. 
Gill, Friedl P. 
Glendinning, Eve C. 
Glennie, George W. 
Goddard, Harold C. Jr. 
Gordon, Katherine M. 
Gordon, Walter N. 
Green, Gerard K. 
Guillet, Arthur 0. 
Guilmette, Richard P. J. 
Gulezian, Vahey S. 
Hall, Albertine E. 
Hall, Russell E. 
Hammond, Virginia H. 
Hansen, Edwin B. Jr. 
Harig, Karl G. Jr. 
Haselton, Mabel M. 
Hayes, Charles E. 
Hayes, Ruth 
Healy, Sarah L. 
Heinz, Albert R. 
Heseltine, Eleanor M. 
Hoffman, Joseph W. 
Hoffman, S. Joseph 
Holt, Henry G. Jr. 
Homsey, Emily W. 
Howe, Charles P. 
Hoyer, Mary 
Hoyer, Raymond A. 
Jameson, Chester W. 
Johnson, Charles M. 
Juengel, Robert R. 
Keating, John H. 
Kibbee, Arthur S. 
Killilea, Peter J. 
Kimball, Margaret G. 
King, Ruth A. 
Klie, Robert H. 
Krull, Betty A. 
Lake, Janet D. 
Lefebvre, Robert J. 
LeGendre, Alice R. 
Letters, James V. 
Locke, Arthur T. 
Locke, Benjamin W. 
Lounsbury, Alan E. 
Low, Thomas W. 
Lowe, Margaret B. 
Lucy, Marguerite M. 
Lundgren, Donald E. 
Lundgren, Marjorie L. 
MacMillan, James A. 
Marjerison, Thomas S. Jr. 



Electrician 

Telephone Operator 

Supervisor 

Accounting Tech. 

Program-Mfg. Coordinator 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Asst. Art Director 

Clerk 

Electrical Engineer 

Chief Accountant 

President & Treasurer 

Housewife 

At Home 

Semi-Retired 

Cost Analyst 

Purch. Dept. Clerk 

Retired 

Reg. Representative 

Technician 

Technician 

Electrical Engineer 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Housewife 

Sales Manager 

Automobile Salesman 

Housewife 

Sales Manager 

At Home 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Plumbing & Heating Bus. 

Exec. Vice President 

Manager 

Head Desk Clerk 

Salesman 

Homemaker 

Retired 

Engineering Supervisor 

Foreman 

Development Engineer 

Production Control 

Shipper 

Materials Manager 

Housewife 

Telephone Engineer 

Department Head 

Homemaker 

Housewife 

Asst. Store Manager 

Housewife 

Exper. Develop. Machinist 

Mechanic 

Toolmaker 

Customer Relations 

Foreman 

Insurance Clerk 

Homemaker 

Funeral Director 

Housewife 

Senior Product Engineer 

Office Manager 



249 Andover Street 
62 Maple Avenue 

36 Chandler Circle 
38 Juliette Street 

14 Elysian Drive 
116 Osgood Street 
10 Appletree Lane 
29 Boutwell Road 

16 Arundel Street 

1 Arrowood Lane 

15 Arcadia Road 

2 Beech Circle 
43 High Street 

50C Wash. Park Drive 
43 Center Street 
21 Wolcott Avenue 
69 Shawsheen Road 

37 Maple Avenue 
37 Maple Avenue 
12 Avon Street 

I Walnut Avenue 
Off Beacon Street 
10 Arthur Road 

148 Argilla Road 
7 Hall Avenue 
Chapel Avenue 

12 Vine Street 

3 Patricia Circle 

II Cheever Circle 
90 Cheever Circle 
28 Phillips Street 
14 School Street 
32 High Plain Road 

21 Strawberry Hill Road 
57 Marilyn Road 

28 Hidden Way 
9 Canterbury Street 
27 High Plain Road 
142 Hidden Road 
66 Wildwood Road 
66 Wildwood Road 
61 Greenwood Road 
82 Woburn Street 
6 Argyle Street 

13 Florence Street 
75 Maple Avenue 
121 Andover Street 
1 Meadowbrook Drive 
50 Ballardvale Road 

17 Rolling Ridge Road 
55 Greenwood Road 

22 Greenwood Road 
20 Clark Road 

4 Burton Farm Drive 
120 Tewksbury Street 
9 Brechin Terrace 
189 Highland Road 
168 High Plain Road 
60 Maple Avenue 

6 Sutherland Street 

149 Chestnut Street 

18 Elm Street 
18 Elm Street 

27 Bannister Road 
87 Burnham Road 



54 



Marland, Robert E. 
Marotta, George J. 
Marshall, Karl L. 
Martin, James S. 
Mason, Robert F. 
McGovern, Mildred W. 
McGrath, Harold E. 
McKeon, John J. 
McKittrick, Thomas A. 
Meyers, Bernice M. 
Miller, Alwyne C. 
Milligan, Charles E. 
Mitchener, Paul E. 
Mooney, Arthur G. 
Moriarty, Daniel L. 
Moriarty, Wilfred D. 
Morrisroe, Lawrence P. 
Mowat, Elsie 
Mower, Richard H. 
Muller, Christopher L. 
Nason, George 
Neisser, Wilson R. 
Neumark, Arthur I. 
Newman, Winthrop R. 
Newton, Wayne 0. 
Nichols, Robert M. 
Northey, Helen L. 
O'Connor, Anna P. 
O'Connor, Charlotte 
Oelwang, Robert C. 
Orlando, Frank J. 
O'Rourke, Charles D. 
Packard, Leslie 
Parker, David B. 
Parson, Esther M. 
Patterson, Helen S. 
Pettit, Madlyn 
Piazza, Augustine 
Pollard, Sydney W. 
Poulin, Donald J. 
Poynter, Elizabeth V. 
Poynter, Horace M. Jr. 
Puma, Antonio 
Rairigh, Mildred W. 
Ratyna, Edward 
Reason, Arthur W. 
Reed, Frederick H. 
Reed, Theodore W. 
Roberts, Margaret C. 
Robinson, David D. 
Robinson, Helen L. 
Ruhl, Malcolm J. 
Ryder, Eleanor M. 
Sabbagh, Linda H. 
Saliba, Irene 
Sawaya, Mitchell 
Schirner, Dorothy 
Seikunas, Ruth E. 
Selden, Georgeanna G. 
Sheehy, Kathleen C. 
Sherman, Robert E. 
Shiebler, Mary W. 
Shorten, Frederick V. 
Simpson, Anne G. 
Skinner, Malcolm E. 



Training Supervisor 

Supervisor 

Working Foreman 

Retired 

Electronic Technician 

Housewife 

Cost Accountant 

Millwright 

Retired 

Registered Nurse 

Layout & Utility Man 

Machinist Foreman 

Sales Manager 

Box Maker 

Safety Engineer 

Clerk 

Asst. Vice President 

At Home 

Bank Manager 

Millwright 

Vice-Pres. Engineering 

Retired 

Sales Manager 

Clerk 

Ins. Underwriter 

Sr. Layout Designer 

Hostess 

Tester 

Store Clerk 

Retail Store Manager 

Land Surveyor 

Test Man 

Engineer 

Research Chemist 

Housewife 

Housewife 

At Home 

Job Analyst 

Department Chief 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Mechanical Engineer 

Retailer 

Housewife 

Commercial Artist 

Superintendent 

Grounds Worker 

Sales Supervisor 

Tax Examiner 

Architectural Draftsman 

Piano Teacher 

Self-employed 

Welcome Wagon Hostess 

Secretary (Part-time) 

Housewife 

Sr. Engr . Administrator 

Housewife 

Executive Secretary 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Electrical Engineer 

Cash Clerk 

Gas Dispatcher 

Tester 

Shipper 



8 George Street 
91 Argilla Road 
119 Chestnut Street 
3 Washington Street 
50 Brookfield Road 

10 Gemini Circle 
Off Greenwood Road 

9 Hartigan Court 

14 Walnut Avenue 

32 Marland Street 
B-2 Colonial Drive 
21 Tewksbury Street 

2 Oriole Drive 
26 Burnham Road 
1234 Main Street 
55 Elm Street 

37 Clark Road 

10 Crescent Drive 
140 Elm Street 

119 High Plain Road 

213 Andover Street 

58 Prospect Road 

90 Elm Street 

121 Elm Street 

19 Pleasant Street 

69 Gould Road 

52 Rocky Hill Road 

7 Argyle Street 

3 Westwind Road 

5 Barrington Drive 
65 Stevens Street 
61 Brookfield Road 
75 Shawsheen Road 

33 Ballardvale Road 
104 Hidden Road 

17 High Plain Road 
1 Longwood Drive 
519 So. Main Street 

5 Juniper Road 

15 Beech Circle 
68 Elm Street 
68 Elm Street 

6 Punchard Avenue 

3 Old South Lane 
21 Brechin Terrace 

7 Walker Avenue 
128 Dascomb Road 

11 Cabot Road 
52 Pine Street 

11 Wild Rose Drive 

4 George Street 
42 Walnut Avenue 
186 Chestnut Street 
63 Lucerne Drive 

6 Gardner Avenue 

5 Twin Brooks Circle 

7 Lincoln Circle 
21 Gould Road 

40 School Street 
241 Lowell Street 

6 College Circle 
29A Maple Avenue 
50 Dufton Road 

16 Gray Road 

67 Walnut Avenue 



55 



Smalley, Bart F. 
Snyder, Edith J. 
Smith, Edmund 
Sparks, James K. Sr . 
Stanley, Charles A. 
Starkweather, David C. 
Stewart, William 
Sullivan, Edward 
Tallini, Lucille 
Tallmadge, Gilbert F. 
Thomson, Alexander 
Thomson, Alexander Jr 
Trenholm, James T. 
Urquhart, William M. 
Valentine, William R. 
VanDerZee, Robert 
Vannett, William B. 
Vigeant, Philip A. 
Vogt, Stanley 0. 
Wadman, Homer C. 
Waldron, Shirley M. 
Walsh, William R. 
Webb, Alfred E. 
Wetterberg, Glennie P. 
White, Mildred C. 
Whitworth, Harold L. 
Wilton, Robert B. 
Wojtkun, Janina B. 
Woodworth, Webster I. 
Wormwood, Helen G. 
Wright, Jason C. 
Wrigley, Henry W. 
Young, John C. 
Zaremba, Stanley A. 



Car Man 

Housewife 

Retired 

Design Analyst 

Loan Specialist 

Senior Engineer 

Industrial Engineer 

Installer 

Wireman 

Co-ordinator 

Clerk 

Steamf itter 

Plant Superintendent 

Electrical Design Engineer 

Senior Electronic Engineer 

Manufacturer 

Receiving Clerk 

Counter Salesman 

Department Chief 

Supervisor of Supplies 

Bank Manager 

Aircraft Maint. Instructor 

Auto Body Mechanic 

Invoice Analyst 

Manager-School Lunch Program 

Self-employed 

Insurance Broker 

Homemaker 

Automobile Dealer 

Housewife 

Community Relations 

Car Salesman 

Department Chief 

Expediter 



19 Hall Avenue 
63 Maple Avenue 

10 Maple Avenue 

18 River Street 
23 Pasho Street 

14 Charlotte Drive 
63 High Plain Road 
123 Salem Street 

19 Marland Street 
19 Johnso n Road 
3 Walnut Avenue 
29 Stevens Street 

15 Westwind Road 
3 Gray Road 

56 Woburn Street 

I Napier Road 

6 Brechin Terrace 
9 Andover Street 

11 Carmel Road 
107 High Street 

28 Canterbury Street 

37 Pasho Street 

86 Ballardvale Road 

51 Summer Street 

66 Chandler Road 

5 Cedar Road 

Foster Pond Road 

19 Moraine Street 

310 North Main Street 

II Lowell Jet. Road 
13 Carisbrooke Street 
1 Lowell Jet. Road 

25 Coolidge Road 

421 South Main Street 



56 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 2, 1970 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Sele 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote i 
assembled at the designated polling places 
and Six, viz: The Central Fire Station in 
Andover Baptist Church, Central Street, in 
Balmoral Street, Shawsheen Village, in Prec 
Precinct Four; the Community Building, Cent 
and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in 



ctmen, January 23, 1970, the Inhabitants 
n Elections and Town Affairs, met and 
in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five 
Precinct One; the Lower Hall of the 
Precinct Two; the Sacred Heart School, 
inct Three; the Andover Grange Hall in 
er Street, Ballardvale, in Precinct Five; 
Precinct Six, in said Andover, on 



MONDAY, THE SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 1970 
at 8:00 o'clock A. M. , to act upon the following articles: 
ESSEX, SS. 



March 2, 1970 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
places and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Thomas P. Eldred, Constable 



ELECTION OF OFFICERS 



ARTICLE 1. 



Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at eight o'clock A. M. 
and closed at eight o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 6,464, viz: 



Precinct 1 - 1281 
Precinct 4 - 1579 



Precinct 2 - 601 
Precinct 5 - 520 



Precinct 3 - 994 
Precinct 6 - 1489 



PRECINCTS 



710 379 614 984 

482 163 321 528 

89 59 59 67 



MODERATOR - FOR ONE YEAR 



331 


612 


Arthur 


Williams 


146 


824 


Philip 


K. Allen 


43 


53 


Blanks 





3630 

2464 

370 



533 235 446 750 

354 250 182 245 

346 106 294 691 

668 308 530 739 

168 66 101 144 

119 48 195 237 

374 189 240 352 



214 


760 


123 


240 


195 


673 


259 


759 


62 


105 


61 


183 


126 


258 



SELECTMEN - TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

Robert A. Watters 
Benjamin C. Brown 
Milton Greenberg 
George E. Heseltine 
Theodore E. Meinelt 
Domenic S. Terranova 
Blanks 



2938 
1394 
2305 
3263 
646 
843 
1539 



57 







PRECINCTS 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


616 


294 


528 


725 


264 


947 


326 


160 


304 


458 


121 


280 


533 


180 


371 


614 


175 


744 


387 


159 


269 


499 


172 


374 


316 


175 


281 


492 


174 


374 


384 


234 


235 


370 


134 


259 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE- TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

Richard A. Katz 
Leo F. Griffin 
Francis J. Hill, Jr. 
Jerome P. Hochschwender 
Irving L. Newman 
Blanks 



3374 
1649 
2617 
1860 
1812 
1616 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
- FIVE FOR THREE YEARS - 



955 450 760 1169 397 1191 

977 453 781 1260 417 1213 

986 442 754 1170 412 1201 

940 411 722 1132 387 1172 

955 421 723 1140 389 1165 

1592 828 1230 2024 598 1503 



Arthur W. Cole 
Fred W. Doyle 
William V. Emmons 
Malcolm J. Ruhl 
Harry Sellars 
Blanks 



4922 
5101 
4965 
4764 
4793 
7775 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
- ONE FOR FIVE YEARS - 



1041 485 811 1242 413 1220 John B. White, Jr. 
240 116 183 337 107 269 Blanks 



5212 
1252 



GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 
- ONE FOR THREE YEARS - 



010 


460 


823 


1283 


420 


1243 


Fred S. Tar box 


271 


141 


171 


296 


100 


246 


Blanks 
QUESTION 


776 


330 


680 


1090 


309 


1116 


YES 


427 


237 


282 


422 


190 


334 


NO 


78 


34 


32 


67 


21 


39 


Blanks 



5239 
1225 



4301 

1892 

271 



All the foregoing officers and question were voted for on one ballot and the 
check lists were used. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 1 



March 2, 1970 



Warden in charge — Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. Polls opened at 8:00 A. M. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 8:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 1281, including 11 absentee ballots. Number of ballots 
cast 1281. Police officer on duty, Richard Caldwell. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 2 



Frederick E. Griffin, Clerk 
March 2, 1970 



Warden in charge— Fernand J. Lussier. Polls opened at 8:00 A. M. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 8:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 601, including 3 absentee ballots. Number of ballots cast 
601. Police officers on duty, Sgt. Hector G. Pattullo, Jr. and Roy Russell. 

Augustine P. Sullivan, Clerk 



58 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 3 



March 2, 1970 



Warden in charge — A. Norman Warhurst. Polls opened at 8:00 A. M. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 8:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 994, including 9 absentee ballots. Number of ballots cast 
994. Police officers on duty, William Atwood and Donald G. Mooers, Jr. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 4 



John J. Broderick, Clerk 
March 2, 1970 



Warden in charge — James D. Doherty. Polls opened at 8:00 A. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 8:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 1579, including 7 absentee ballots. Number of ballots cast 1579. 
Police officer on duty, Joseph Becotte. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 5 



Charles W. Smyth, Clerk 
March 2, 1970 



Warden in charge — Chester A. MacMillan. Polls opened at 8:00 A. M. Ballot box 
registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 8:00 P. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls closed 520, including 1 absentee ballot. Number of ballots cast 
520. Police officer on duty, Calvin Metcalf. 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 6 



Roland V. Grover, Clerk 
March 2, 1970 



Warden in charge — Raymond Hoyer. Polls opened at 8:00 A. M. Ballot box regis- 
tered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 8:00 P. M. Ballot box registered 
when polls closed 1489, including 24 absentee ballots. Number of ballots cast 1489. 
Police officer on duty, Lawrence Lynch. 

Edward A. Doyle, Clerk 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by virtue of 
Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Saturday, March 7, 1970, at 9:30 
o'clock A. M. at the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 7, 1970 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 660 voters admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 9:40 A. M. 

The opening prayer was offered by the Reverend George F. Vought , Curate, Christ 
Episcopal Church. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman William Stewart. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit eleven non-voters to the meeting, including 
three persons who wished to address the meeting, namely — Town Manager Austin, 
School Superintendent Kenneth Seifert and Library Director Frances A. Bold. 

The Moderator then declared a short recess. 



59 



At 10:05 A. M. , the Moderator declared that a quorum was present and that the meet- 
ing would come to order. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to dispense with the reading of 
the Warrant and the return of service of the constable, and that the Moderator refer 
to the articles by number and by subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, two 
members of the School Committee for three years, five Trustees of the Punchard Free 
School for three years, one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years, 
one member of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School Dis- 
trict Committee for three years and any other town officers required by law to be 
elected by ballot, also to vote on the following question: 

QUESTION: — "Shall the fluoridation of the public water supply for domestic 
use in Andover be continued?" 

All the above candidates and question to be voted for on one ballot. The polls 
will be open from 8:00 o'clock A. M. to 8:00 o'clock P. M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of the election and question on March 2, 1970 
and declared Arthur Williams elected as Moderator and that he had previously been 
sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that office. 

The Town Clerk also declared the other successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices and that they had been sworn to the faithful performance of the 
duties of their offices. 

Robert A. Watters, Selectman for Three Years 

George E. Heseltine, Selectman for Three Years 

Richard A. Katz, School Committee for Three Years 

Francis J. Hill, Jr., School Committee for Three Years 

Arthur W. Cole, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Fred W. Doyle, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

William V. Emmons, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Malcolm J. Ruhl, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Harry Sellars, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three Years 

John B. White, Jr., Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

Fred S. Tarbox, Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District Committee for Three Years 

QUESTION— The Vote YES-4,301 NO-1,892 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by 
ballot. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Frederick E. Cheever be elected 
Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected TOWN OFFICERS for the ensuing 
year. 



60 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the salaries of the elected TOWN 
OFFICERS be established as follows for the ensuing year: (each item being voted on 
separately) : 



Moderator 
Selectmen 

Chairman 

Other Members 



$25.00 for each town meeting 

$500.00 per year 
$400.00 per year 



ARTICLE 4. To determine what sums of money shall be appropriated for the 1970 
Town Budget as submitted by the Town Manager and reviewed by the Finance Committee 
in its report. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and appropriate the following 
sums of money : 



Town Moderator 
Board of Selectmen 

Town Manager 

Elections and Registrations 

Finance Committee 
Town Accountant 

Town Treasurer 

Tax Collector 

Board of Assessors 

Town Counsel 
Town Clerk 
Planning Board 
Municipal Services 
Conservation Commission 



Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $700 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $750 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 



$ 75.00 



700.00 
523.00 



Industrial Development Commission Other Expenses 



Central Services 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



32 
5 



16 
12 



29 
16 

22 
3 

19 
3 

30 
11 



5 
12 

15 

2 

6 
13 

11 
20 

2 

4 

6 
19 



591.00 
040.00 



088.00 
000.00 

500.00 

244.00 
450.00 

058.00 
950.00 

900.00 
140.00 

702.00 
620.00 



000.00 
500.00 

799.00 
275.00 

594.00 
440.00 

802.00 
700.00 

825.00 

000.00 

020.00 
214.00 



61 



Board of Appeals 



Council on Aging 



Police Department 



Fire Department 



Civil Defense 



Animal Control 



Electrical Inspection 



Weights and Measures 



Building Inspection 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Highways (General Maintenance) 

Parks 

Forestry 

Vehicle Maintenance 

Street Lighting 
Engineering 

Sewers 

Landfill Operation 

Garbage Contract 
Board of Health 

Animal Inspection 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses (Incl. $500 
for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $500 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $100 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $100 

for out-of-state travel) 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $50 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $100 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 



$ 1,336.00 
775.00 

1,752.00 
3,955.00 

378,539.00 
58,350.00 



504,053.00 
47,700.00 



1,000.00 
2,550.00 



6,522.00 
2,900.00 

4,636.00 
825.00 

1,800.00 
688.00 

16,701.00 
2,790.00 



153,000.00 
206,850.00 

36,880.00 
11,000.00 

47,781.00 
12,675.00 



23,165.00 
108,000.00 

70,000.00 

20,188.00 
1,195.00 

32,871.00 
17,050.00 



21,252.00 
25,050.00 

40,000.00 

25,119.00 
3,830.00 

600.00 



62 



Veterans' Services 

Andover School Department 

Regional Vocational School 
Library 



Recreation Department 



Water 



Spring Grove Cemetery 



$ 13,744.00 

1,475.00 

44,114.00 

4,654,931.00 
991,033.00 



81,660.00 

157,837.00 
88,304.00 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
Assistance 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. 

$11,900 for out-of-state travel) 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $400 

for out-of-state travel-less 

dog license reimbursement 

($2,471.07) and Grant-in-Aid 

($4,283.50) 



Personal Services 48,684.00 

Other Expenses 18,716.00 

Personal Services 123,508.00 

Other Expenses ( Incl. $150 102,650.00 
for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 30,000.00 

Other Expenses (Total — $35,095 5,095.00 
less investment income-$9, 505=$25, 590) 



Insurance 

Employee Benefits 

Patriotic and Civic Celebrations 

Veterans' Headquarters and Rental 

Retirement 

Non-Contributory Pensions 

Damages to Persons and Property 

Interest Expense 

Bond Redemptions 

Equipment Outlay 

Compensation Plan 

Total BUDGET to be raised by taxation 



90,000.00 

34,000.00 

3,935.00 

2,160.00 

117,215.00 

15,302.00 

6,000.00 

583,514.00 

1,110,000.00 

6,300.00 

100,000.00 

$10,638,045.43 



SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM TAXATION) 

ARTICLE 6 Chapter 90 Highway Construe ti en 

ARTICLE 9 Alterations of the Town House 

ARTICLE 10 Installing road drains at various locations 

ARTICLE 13 Electronic Voting Machines (final payment) 

ARTICLE 14 M B T A Contract 



80,000.00 

30,000.00 

50,000.00 

5,000.00 

2,500.00 



63 



ARTICLE 15 School Sites 

ARTICLE 17 Shawsheen School Playgrounds 

ARTICLE 18 Replace windows at High School 

ARTICLE 19 Demolish Hurley property on Bartlet Street 

ARTICLE 20 Completion of tennis courts at High School 

ARTICLE 21 Softball fields—outdoor lighting 

ARTICLE 22 Pumping Station Equipment (Haggetts Pond) 

ARTICLE 23 Pumping Station Equipment (Bancroft) 

ARTICLE 24 Force sewer main (Pumping Station at Haggetts 
Pond along Lowell Street) 

ARTICLE 25 Laying and relaying water mains 

ARTICLE 27 Consultant — study water rate structure 

ARTICLE 32 Purchase right to remove sand, etc. 

ARTICLE 33 Acquire land for Public Works purposes 

ARTICLE 34 Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 

ARTICLE 37 Purchase land for Conservation 

ARTICLE 38 Construction of dam at Pomps Pond 

ARTICLE 41 Sewer mains — Wild Rose Drive 

ARTICLE 42 325th Anniversary — Town's Incorporation 

ARTICLE 43 Payment of old bills 

Total SPECIAL ARTICLES to be raised by taxation 



^ 3,500.00 

15,000.00 

15,000.00 

2,500.00 

3,000.00 

7,000.00 

55,000.00 

40,000.00 

17,000.00 

10,000.00 

9,000.00 

10,000.00 

25,000.00 

1,582.45 

100,000.00 

10,000.00 

50,000.00 

5,000.00 

2,331.03 

$548,413.48 



SPECIAL ARTICLES (TO BE BONDED) 
ARTICLE 15 School Sites 
ARTICLE 26 Water Treatment Plant 
Total SPECIAL ARTICLES to be bonded 



365,000.00 

4,000,000.00 

$4,365,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS) 

ARTICLE 15 School Sites 

ARTICLE 16 Shawsheen School Renovations 

ARTICLE 36 From Conservation Fund 

Total SPECIAL ARTICLES from available funds 



$ 11,500.00 
10,000.00 
35,000.00 

$ 56,500.00 



GRAND TOTAL BUDGET AND SPECIAL ARTICLES 
ARTICLE 8 Overlay Reserve to Reserve Fund 
ARTICLE 45 Free cash to reduce 1970 tax rate 



$15,607,958.91 

45,000.00 

380,000.00 



64 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, MARCH 7, 1970 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Town Manager and the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the 
revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 1970 and January 1, 1971, in 
accordance with provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 5 as printed in the war- 
rant . 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $80,000 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, the Town to be reimbursed 50% by 
the Commonwealth and 25% by the County; and to authorize the Town to acquire neces- 
sary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 6 and raise 
by taxation the sum of $80,000 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, the Town to be 
reimbursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County; and to authorize the Town 
to acquire necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $18,000 to be used to re- 
surface all or part of Lowell Street, the funds to meet this appropriation to be pro- 
vided by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under provisions of Section 4 of Chapter 
768 of the Acts of 1969. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to appropriate $17,112.45 to be used to 
resurface all or part of Lowell Street, the funds to meet this appropriation to be 
provided by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under provisions of Section 4 of Chap- 
ter 768 of the Acts of 1969. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $50,000 from Overlay Reserve 
to the Reserve Fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer $45,000 from Overlay Reserve to 
the Reserve Fund. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $50,000, and to 
authorize the Town Manager to use the funds for alterations, repairs and maintenance 
of the Town House. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as printed in the war- 
rant in the amount of $30,000 by taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Hardy. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $50,000.00 for 
the purpose of installing road drains and authorize the Selectmen to acquire the 
necessary easements by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 
The persons whose lands would be affected are supposed to be: 

Bancroft Road 

Assessors Map 58, Lot 23A Richard S. & Mary E. O'Hara 



65 



Bellevue Road 

Assessors Map 176, Lot 12 John C. & Margaret T. Ebert 

176 13 Domenic R. & Mary A. Procopio 

176 14 Charles F. & Ruth E. O'Neil 

176 14A Domenic R. & Mary A. Procopio 

198 7 Herbert & Elizabeth S. Wolf 

198 8 Robert J. & Lillian Strauss 

198 9 John M. & Shirley L. Galber 

198 10 John J. & Marion M. Hanley 



High Plain Road 

Assessors Map 149, Lot 3 



Holt Road 

Assessors Map 44 



Serafina Babicki 



49 Clinton D. Shaw 



Osgood Street 

Assessors Map 177 



John M. & Elizabeth W. Forbes 



Stinson Road 

Assessors Map 43 

Highland Road 

Assessors Map 23 



10 George H. Ill & Margot P. Bixby 



4 Trustees of Phillips Academy 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 10 as 
printed in the warrant in the amount of $50,000 by taxation. A report of the Ando- 
ver Planning Board was read by John Hardy. 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $6,500 for drainage improvements on Bellevue Road and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire all necessary easements therefor by gift, by purchase or by 
seizure by right of eminent domain over portions of Tessier Drive, owned by: 



Map No. 

176 
176 
176 
176 



Lot No. 

12 
13 

14A 
14 



Supposed to be owned by 

John C. and Margaret T. Ebert 
Domenic R. and Mary A. Procopio 
Domenic R. and Mary A. Procopio 
Charles F. and Ruth E. O'Neill 



198 
198 
198 
198 



7 

8 

9 

10 



Herbert and Elizabeth S. Wolf 
Robert J. and Lillian Strauss 
John M. and Shirley L. Galber 
John J. and Marion M. Hanley - 384 Lowell Street 



on petition of Domenic R. Procopio and others. 
Article 11 was withdrawn. 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to accept on 



behalf of the Town the gift of an automobile for the use of the Council on Aging. 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 12 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $7,000 as the third of three payments for the purchase of so-called elec- 
tronic voting machines, said amount to be added to the amounts voted under Article 
14 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 1968, and Article 9 of the Annual Town Meet- 
ing of March 1969. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 13 as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $5,000 by taxation. 



66 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $2,500 and to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a one year contract 
with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and to use said sum or any part 
thereof to defray deficits of the railroad resulting from providing commuter service 
from Andover to Boston. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 14 as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $2,500 by taxation. 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to rescind action taken on Article 10 of 
the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting held March 10, 1969, and, further, to see if 
the Town will vote to appropriate $380,000 to acquire for school purposes the fee in 
certain parcels of land in whole or in part described as follows: 



MAP # 



LOT # 



SUPPOSED TO BE OWNED BY 



AREA (+/-) 



SITE #1 



153 


1 


153 


6 


153 


7 


153 


8 


153 


9 


153 


10 


153 


11 


153 


12 


153 


13 


153 


14 


153 


15 


153 


16 


153 


17 


153 


18 


153 


19 


153 


20 


153 


21 


SITE #2 





John M. & Elizabeth W. Forbes 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 



2.47 A 
44,762 sf 
43,560 sf 
43,560 sf 
43,560 sf 
43,560 sf 
44,173 sf 
60,000 sf 
45,100 sf 
43, 560 sf 
43,560 sf 
1.17 A 
43,560 sf 
43,560 sf 
43,560 sf 
43,560 sf 
7.5A 



139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 



1 

2 

3 

4 

4A 

5 

6 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 



Leslie J. & Valerie Trombly 
Wallace S. & Martha Ferris 
Charles E. & Clara C. Bengtson 
Roland I. & Phyllis E. Luken 
Harold D. & Edna M. Sheaff 
Harold D. & Edna M. Sheaff 
Andre A. & Rita M. Croteau 
Robert L. & Louise M. Mears 
Robert L. & Louise M. Mears 
Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 
Eleanor D. Doyle & Philip F. Doyle 
Eleanor D. Doyle & Philip F. Doyle 
Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 
Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 
Philip F. & Eleanor D. Doyle 
Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 
Carl F. & Jennie C. Mudgett 

(David D. & Amy R. Robinson; 

(John & Amy Ramsay 



3.79 A 
4.21 A 
1.1 A 
5,829 sf 
2,500 sf 
2.74 A 
3.25 A 

4,000 sf 
5,000 sf 
11,000 sf 
5,000 sf 
5,000 sf 
16,000 sf 
16,960 sf 
7,500 sf 
11,316 sf 

5,200 sf 
10,400 sf 



139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 



30 
31 
33 
35 
38 
39 
40 



James M. Thresher 

Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 

Thomas A., Jr. & Patricia Emmons 

Thomas A., Jr. & Patricia Emmons 

Sylvester & Mildred McGovern 

Carl F. & Jennie C. Mudgett 

Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 



5,200 sf 
5,200 sf 
22,592 sf 
15,000 sf 
25,941 sf 
26,986 sf 
49,080 sf 



67 



SITE #2-cont 



MAP # 


LOT 


139 


41 


139 


50A 


139 


50 


139 


55 


139 


60A 


139 


68 


139 


69 


139 


72 


139 


76 


139 


77 


139 


81 


139 


82 


139 


83 


139 


84 


139 


85 


139 


86 


139 


87 


139 


88 


139 


90 


139 


91 


139 


92 


139 


93 


139 


93A 


139 


94 


139 


95 


139 


96 


139 


97 


139 


98 


139 


99 


139 


100 


139 


101 


139 


102 


139 


104 


139 


108 


139 


109 


139 


110 


139 


111 


139 


114 


139 


115 


139 


116 


139 


117 


139 


118 


139 


119 


139 


121 


139 


122 


139 


123 


139 


124 


139 


125 


139 


126 


139 


127 


139 


128 


139 


131 


139 


132 


139 


133 


139 


137 


139 


138 


139 


139 


139 


140 


139 


141 


139 


143 



SUPPOSED TO BE OWNED BY 

Philip & Eleanor D. Doyle 

Horace J. & Mary J. Hayman 

Susan B. Wonson 

John J. & Elizabeth H. Provosoli 

John Doe 

Saul Dearborn (Heirs) 

Mary McCabe 

John A. Quinn, et al 

Drina Jane Tomlinson 

Susie M. Young 

Albert & Mona Marryat 

Eugene B. Hamilton (Trust) 

Dorothy Martell 

John S. & Marion F. 

& Marion F. 

& Marion F. 

& Marion F. 



Gollan 
Gollan 
Gollan 
Gollan 



John S. 

John S. 

John S. 

Willard T. & Barbara C. Ferris 

Eugene B. Hamilton (Trust) 

Asdrubale Azzari 

Herbert & Stella Starr 

John Doe 

Max T. Goldman 

Clodemire & Daisy Bessette 

Roland & Florence Decaher 

Clara Rogers; Louise & Winnifred Axelby 

Fred & Florence Edmunds 

Joseph & Lena Gallant 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Elmer & Ola Brackenbush 

Eugene Gorrill 

Ethel C. Hoarty 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Frank & Stella Moriarty 

Mary C. & Bowden Holmes 

Eugene Hamilton 

Eugene Hamilton 

Wm. James Curtis 

Jeremiah J. Regan 

Hugh, Jr. & Annie McLay 

Andrew Long 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Charles & Ann Dixon 

Earl R. & Mary Campbell 

Eugene Hamilton 

William F. Quinn, Jr; Olive Quigley 

Eugene Hamilton 

Thomas & Effie Birney 

Louis & Marie Bannister 

Eugene Hamilton 

Fred & Bessie Dyment 

Francis Brackett 

Eugene Hamilton 

Jean E. (Cassely) Long 

Henry and Mary Medugno 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Thorn., Jr. & Grace Talbot 

Annie Richardson 



AREA (+/-) 

13,110 sf 

17,740 sf 

13.26 A 

4.1 A 

14,575 sf 

4,500 sf 

.5 A 

6.0 A 
,500 sf 
,500 sf 
,500 sf 
,500 sf 
,685 sf 
,273 sf 
,158 sf 
,045 sf 
,431 sf 

,023 sf 
,638 sf 
,000 sf 
,600 sf 
,213 sf 
,825 sf 
,437 sf 
5,053 sf 
,666 sf 
,288 sf 
,950 sf 
,610 sf 
,200 sf 
,000 sf 
,644 sf 
,306 sf 
,228 sf 
,486 sf 
,566 sf 

13,938 sf 
,806 sf 
,841 sf 
,886 sf 
,934 sf 
,995 sf 
0,825 sf 
,310 sf 

10,734 sf 
,214 sf 
,112 sf 
A 

22,689 sf 
,000 sf 
,000 sf 
,216 sf 
,000 sf 
,000 sf 
,250 sf 
5,625 sf 
,250 sf 

20,836 sf 
0,408 sf 
,108 sf 



4 

4 

3 

3 

5 

4 

4 

4 

4 

12. 

3 

7 

6, 

6 

5 

5 

4 
4 
3 
4 
2 
5 
4 
4 
2 
4 
4 
1 
4 
4 
4 
8 
3 
1 
8 
1 
5 
5 



68 



SITE #3 

MAP # LOT # SUPPOSED TO BE OWNED BY AREA (+/-) 

62 11 Anna White 23.5 A 

and to determine whether such sum shall be raised by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing; and to author- 
ize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said parcels by gift, by purchase or by seiz- 
ure by right of eminent domain, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town transfer $11,500 of the 
money raised under Article 10 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of March, 
1969 and under Article 2 of the Supplemental Warrant of the Meeting held March, 1969 
and that the Town rescind all other action taken under both said Articles, and I 
further move that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to acquire for school pur- 
poses by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain the following sites: 

SITE 1 



MAP # LOT # SUPPOSED OWNER APPROXIMATE 

AREA 

John M. and Elizabeth W. Forbes 2.47 acres 

Harry Axelrod 



153 


1 


153 


6 to 21 inclusive 


152 


25 


152 


27 


152 


28 


152 


30 to 35 inclusive 



Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod ) 33 acres 

Harry Axelrod 

Harry Axelrod 

SITE 2 

To include that portion of the following lots west of a line 450 feet west of the 
westerly line of Woburn Street: 

139 2 Wallace S. & Martha Ferris 1.95 acres 

139 3 Charles E. & Clara C. Bengtson 0.41 acres 

139 5 Harold D. & Edna M. Sheaf f 1.44 acres 

139 6 Andre A. & Rita M. Croteau 1.52 acres 

To include that portion of the following lots south of a line 400 feet south of and 
parallel to the southerly line of Andover Street: 

Eleanor D. & Philip F. Doyle 1,500 sq. ft. 

Sylvester & Mildred McGovern 10,780 sq.ft. 

Carl F. & Jennie C. Mudgett 12,000 sq.ft. 

Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 19,650 sq.ft. 

To include that portion of the following lot southeasterly of a line running from 
the southeasterly corner of lot 33, Map 139, to the northeasterly corner of Lot 50A, 
thence along the easterly boundaries of Lots 50A and 54, Map 139. 

139 50 Susan B. Wonson 11.4 acres 

To include those portions of the following lots easterly of a line running from the 
southeasterly corner of Lot 54, Map 139, to the center of a proposed street shown 
between Lots 83 & 89, Map 139, extended to the property line of Lot 72, Map 139. 

139 55 John J. & Elizabeth H. Provosoli 1.9 acres 

139 72 John A. Quinn, et al 1.9 acres 

And to include all of the following lots: 

139 24 Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 16,000 sq.ft. 

139 25 Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 16,960 sq.ft. 

69 



139 


23 


139 


38 


139 


39 


139 


40 



SITE #2-cont. 



MAP # 


LOT # 


139 


26 


139 


27 


139 


28 


139 


29 


139 


30 


139 


31 


139 


41 


139 


90 


139 


91 


139 


92 


139 


93 


139 


93A 


139 


94 


139 


95 


139 


96 


139 


97 


139 


98 


139 


99 


139 


100 


139 


101 


139 


102 


139 


104 


139 


108 


139 


109 


139 


125 


139 


126 


139 


127 


139 


128 


139 


131 


139 


132 


139 


133 


139 


137 


139 


138 


139 


139 


SITE #3 





62 



11 



S UPPOSED OWNER 

Philip F. & Eleanor D. Doyle 

Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 

Carl F. & Jennie C. Mudgett 
( David D. & Amy R. Robinson 
( John & Amy Ramsay 

James M. Thresher 

Eleanor C. Doyle, Exec. 

Philip & Eleanor D. Doyle 

Eugene B. Hamilton (Trust) 

Asdrubale Azzari 

Herbert & Stella Starr 

John Doe 

Max T. Goldman 

Clodemire 8s Daisy Bessette 

Roland & Florence Decaher 

Clara Rogers; Louise & Winnifred Axelby 

Fred & Florence Edmunds 

Joseph & Lena Gallant 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Elmer & Ola Brackenbush 

Eugene Gorrill 

Ethel C. Hoarty 

Eugene B. Hamilton 

Frank & Stella Moriarty 

William F. Quinn, Jr.; Olive Quigley 

Eugene Hamilton 

Thomas & Effie Birney 

Louis & Marie Bannister 

Eugene Hamilton 

Fred & Bessie Dyment 

Francis Brackett 

Eugene Hamilton 

Jean E. (Cassely) Long 

Henry and Mary Medugno 



Anna White 



APPROXIMATE 


AREA 


7,500 


sq. f t . 


11,316 sq.ft 


5,200 


sq. ft. 


10,400 sq.ft 


5,200 


sq. f t . 


5,200 


sq. f t . 


13,110 sq.ft 


3,638 


sq. f t . 


7,000 


sq. f t . 


6,600 


sq. f t . 


6,213 


sq. f t . 


5,825 


sq. f t. 


5,437 


sq. f t . 


5,053 


sq.ft. 


4,666 


sq. ft. 


4,288 


sq.ft. 


3,950 


sq. ft. 


4,610 


sq. f t . 


2,200 


sq.ft. 


5,000 


sq.ft. 


4,644 


sq. f t . 


4,306 


sq. f t . 


2,228 


sq. f t . 


4,486 


sq. f t . 


4 acres 


22,68S 


» sq.ft 


5,000 


sq.ft. 


5,000 


sq.ft. 


7,216 


sq. f t . 


5,000 


sq. f t . 


5,000 


sq.ft. 


6,250 


sq. f t . 


15,625 


sq.ft. 


6,250 


sq. ft. 


23.5 acres 



and, further, that to meet said appropriation, the sum of $11,500 shall be trans- 
ferred from the unexpended balance of the appropriation made under Article 10 at 
the 1969 Annual Town Meeting and raised by taxation in 1969, and that the sum of 
$3,500 shall be raised by taxation in the current year and the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, is hereby authorized to issue and sell bonds or notes of 
the Town at one time or from time to time not exceeding in principal amount the sum 
of $365,000 pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3), of the General Laws as amended 
and supplemented, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more than 
twenty (20) years from its date; and that the Selectmen are hereby authorized to 
acquire said parcels by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain, 
except that parcels shown on Map 152, Lots 25, 27, 28, and 30-35 be acquired only 
by purchase or gift. 

The Vote — YES 287, NO 2 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A quorum was 
present. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Hardy. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds $10,000 for renovations to the Shawsheen Elementary 
School. 



70 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 16 as 
printed in the warrant in the amount of $10,000 from available funds. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Hardy. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $50,000 for the construc- 
tion and development on town property of a ballfield and playgrounds in the Shaw- 
sheen School area and determine how said sum will be raised — by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to raise by taxation and ap- 
propriate the sum of $15,000 for the construction and development of a play area at 
the Shawsheen School site. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Hardy. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $25,000.00 to 
be used to replace broken and defective windows at the High School. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 18 as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $15,000 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $2,500 and to 
authorize the Town Manager to use the funds to demolish structures and level the 
land formerly owned by Randall Hurley on Bartlet Street. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 19 as printed 
in the Warrant in the amount of $2,500 by taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Hardy. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $3,000.00 for 
the construction of tennis courts on the existing paved recreational areas at the 
High School. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town raise by taxation 
and appropriate under Article 20, the sum of $3,000.00 for the completion of tennis 
courts on the existing paved recreational areas at the High School. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $7,000 for the erection of outdoor lighting for one or more of the Town soft- 
ball fields, on petition of John J. Fairburn and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 21 in the 
amount of $7,000 by taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

This article was not moved after Article 20, but on motion made and duly seconded, 
the Moderator allowed it to be reconsidered after Article 64. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $55,000 for pumping sta- 
tion equipment and necessary appurtenances at the Haggetts Pond Pumping Station and 
to determine how said sum will be raised, by taxation, by transfer, by borrowing or 
by any combination of the foregoing, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that Article 22 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $55,000 by taxation. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 23 be delayed until 
after action on Article 29. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will appropriate $40,000 for the installation of 
a force sewer main less than 8" in diameter from the pumping station at Haggetts 

71 



Pond along Lowell Street to an existing sewer line near route 93, and to determine 
how said sum will be raised, by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by bor- 
rowing or by any combination of the foregoing; and authorize the Town Manager to 
contract with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works to install some of the 
sewer line, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the Town appropriate 
$17,000 for the installation of a force sewer main from the pumping station at 
Haggetts Pond along Lowell Street to an existing sewer line near Route 93 and to 
raise the said sum by taxation, and it was further moved that the Town authorize 
the Town Manager to contract with the Mass. Department of Public Works to install 
some of the sewer lines. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation $10,000 to add to 
the funds appropriated under Article 4 of the Warrant of the Special Town Meeting 
of August 21, 1967 for the purpose of laying and relaying water mains. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that Article 25 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $10,000 by taxation. A report of the 
Andover Planning Board was read by David M. Erickson. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $4,000,000 or any other 
sum to construct a water treatment plant with all necessary appurtenances, includ- 
ing original equipment therefor, at Haggetts Pond and to determine how such sum 
shall be raised whether by taxation, transfer, or borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing or otherwise, to authorize the Selectmen to apply for and accept 
any Federal, State, or County aid available and use the funds for that purpose, or 
take any other action connected with or incidental to the foregoing and authorize 
the Selectmen to acquire on behalf of the town by purchase, by gift, or by seizure 
by right of eminent domain, temporary construction easements, and permanent ease- 
ments over lands supposed to be owned by: 

1 - Karl C. Killorin - Map 175 Lot 3A 

and to take any other action incidental to or connected with the foregoing matters 
or any of them. Betterments may be assessed. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the sum of $4,000,000 be 
hereby appropriated for the purpose of constructing a water treatment plant with 
all necessary appurtenances, including original equipment therefor, at Haggetts 
Pond; that to meet said appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen is hereby authorized to issue and sell bonds or notes of the Town at one 
time or from time to time not exceeding in principal amount the sum of $4,000,000 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8(4), of the General Laws as amended and supplement- 
ed, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more than twenty (20) 
years from its date, provided that the aggregate amount of such bonds or notes 
shall be reduced by the amount of any grant or grants of Federal, State or County 
funds received prior to the sale of said bonds or notes; that the Selectmen are 
hereby authorized to acquire on behalf of the Town by purchase, by gift or by seiz- 
ure by right of eminent domain temporary construction easements and permanent ease- 
ments over land supposed to be owned by: 

1 - Karl C. Killorin - Map 175 Lot 3A 

and that the Selectmen are hereby authorized to apply for and accept any Federal, 
State or County aid available for the foregoing purposes, provided that no bonds 
or notes shall be issued hereunder until the Town shall have received from the 
United States of America, formal notification as to whether the Town qualifies for 
a Federal grant for the purposes for which said bonds or notes are authorized. 

A quorum was present. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David M. 
Erickson. 



72 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 



sum of $9,000.00 for the purpose of permitting the Town Manager to contract with a 
consultant for a study of the water rate structure of the Town of Andover . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 27 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $9,000 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of General Laws, 
C. 40, S~! 8D, to establish for the Town, an Historical Commission of seven members. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 28 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to memorialize the Governor and members 
of the General Court concerning the preservation of the Home Rule of Municipalities. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town memorialize the Governor and 
members of the General Court concerning the preservation of the Home Rule of Munici- 
palities and adopt the following: 

RESOLUTION: 

The Town of Andover, by an affirmative vote taken during the .Annual Town Meeting 
on Saturday, March 7, 1970, hereby petitions the Massachusetts Great and General 
Court to respect the financial plight of the cities and towns by rejecting all 
legislation which would place added costs, directly or indirectly, on the municipali- 
ties without providing for local acceptance or for funding by other than local taxa- 
tion. 

The Town of Andover further petitions that the Legislature do everything in its 
power to implement further the concept of "home rule", and to make meaningful the 
rights of municipal employers and employees to bargain collectively without imposi- 
tion of statewide legislation which affects, directly or indirectly, the agreements 
reached. 

The vote of the Town Meeting also requested that a copy of this petition be for- 
warded to each member of the Great and General Court and to the Executive Department. 

After action on Article 29, the meeting went back to act on Article 23. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will appropriate $40,000 for pumping station equip- 
ment and necessary appurtenances at the Bancroft Booster Station and determine how 
said sum will be raised by taxation, by transfer, or by borrowing or by any combina- 
tion of the foregoing, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 23 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $40,000 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will rescind the vote taken on Article 10 at the 
Special Town Meeting held March 18, 1968, which established as a by-law of the Town, 
Article II, Section 1A, under which section, a Special Town Meeting is required to 
be held the first Monday of each October. 

Article 30 was defeated. 

At this time, Chairman Watters of the Board of Selectmen called for a standing 
ovation for Town Clerk Irving 0. Piper, who is to retire on March 31 after having 
served the Town faithfully and well for almost ten years. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend the by-laws of the Town, Article 
II, Section 1, paragraph 1, to change the date of the Annual Town Meeting to the 
first Monday of April in each year. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator appoint a Committee of 
seven citizens to study Article 31 and report back to the October Special Town 

73 



Meeting. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$25,000 for the purchase of sand, gravel and fill for town purposes. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town raise by taxation and appro- 
priate $10,000 for the purchase of the right to remove sand, gravel and fill for 
town purposes. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$25,000 and authorize the Selectmen to use the sum to acquire by gift, by purchase, 
or by seizure by right of eminent domain for Public Works purposes lots 32 and 33 
on Assessors' Map 38; the land is supposed to belong to W. Rodney Hill and John Dana 
Hill, trustees of Owanji Realty Trust. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 33 as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $25,000 by taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
the sum of $1,582.45 to meet the Town's share of the cost of the Greater Lawrence 
Sanitary District for the year 1970 as determined by Chapter 750 of the 1968 Acts 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 34 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $1,582.45 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the custody and control 
of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, Chapter 
40, Section 8C as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following described 
land: 

Land of the Town of Andover, being Lot 1 of Assessors' Map 150, containing 
19.75 acres, located off Greenwood Road 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that Article 35 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commission 
to expend the sum of $35,000 from the Conservation Fund for the acquisition for con- 
servation purposes under G. L. c40, s.8C, the fee of the following described land: 

The southeasterly portion of Lot 5 of Assessors' Map 218, supposed to be owned 
by Colony Land Company, Inc., bounded: 

Northwesterly by the northwesterly line of the New England Power Service Co. 
right of way; 

Northeasterly by land of the Town of Andover; 

Easterly by land of High Plain Realty Trust; 

Southerly by Lot 16 of Map 219, now or formerly of Lerner and Mufson; and by 
Lot 3 of Assessors' Map 209, now or formerly of New England Power Service Co.; 
and 

Westerly by Lot 8 of Assessors' Map 218, now or formerly of Thomes. 

said land to be acquired by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 36 as 

74 



printed in the Warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from 
available funds, or by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appro- 
priate the sum of $100,000 and to authorize the Conservation Commission to expend 
said $100,000 together with such moneys as may be in the Conservation Fund, for the 
purpose of purchasing for conservation purposes under G. L . , c.40, s.8C, as amended, 
or as hereafter further amended, the fee, or any lesser interest, in all or part of 
the following described lands, or such other lands as may hereafter be authorized 
by the Town; no purchase to be made without the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
title in every case to be in the name of the Town: 

1. The land in Andover lying along the southerly bank of the Merrimack River, 
consisting of two parcels bounded and described as follows: 

PARCEL A. 

Beginning at Essex Company Stone Bound No. 11, which is located at the south- 
easterly corner of land formerly of Levi York conveyed to the Essex Company 
on July 6, 1847, by deed recorded with South Essex Deeds, Book 385, Page 50, 
thence westerly by the remains of a stone wall about 1510 feet to Essex Company 
Stone Bound No. 12; thence northerly along a line running from said Stone Bound 
No. 12 to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 13 about 700 feet to a point in said 
line 100 feet from said Stone Bound No. 13; thence westerly in a straight line 
about 1200 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 16; thence southerly about 
421 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 17; thence southeasterly about 182 
feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 18; thence southwesterly about 151 feet 
to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 19; thence westerly about 338 feet to Essex 
Company Stone Bound No. 20; thence northwesterly about 20 feet to Essex Company 
Stone Bound No. 21; thence northeasterly about 96 feet to Essex Company Stone 
Bound No. 22; thence northwesterly about 182 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound 
No. 23; thence northerly about 392 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 24; 
thence westerly about 171 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 25; thence 
southwesterly about 462 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 26; thence north- 
westerly about 39 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 27; thence northerly 
about 593 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 28; thence northwesterly about 
501 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 29; thence westerly about 433.8 feet 
through Essex Company Stone Bound No. 30 to the easterly sideline of Interstate 
Highway Route 93; thence northerly by said highway 517 feet, more or less, to 
the Merrimack River; thence southeasterly by the Merrimack River 4800 feet, 
more or less, to a point shown as Point "D" on Plan of Land of Essex Company 
dated November 14, 1950; thence northerly 5 feet, more or less, to a Stone 
Bound; thence southwesterly 295 feet to an iron pipe which is located in a 
northerly prolongation of the line from Essex Company Stone Bound No. 11 to 
Essex Company Stone Bound No. 10; thence southerly about 282 feet to Essex 
Company Stone Bound No. 10; thence continuing southerly about 140.62 feet to 
the point of beginning. 

Said Parcel A is composed of the following lots, or parts thereof, proceeding 
from east to west: 

Lot 1 of Assessors' Map No. 125, supposed to be owned by Frank Strazzulla 
and others, doing business as partnership under name and style of Strazzulla 
Bros. Co. 

Lot 2 of Assessors' Map No. 125, supposed to be owned by Trustees of Phillips 
Academy. 

Lot 3A of Assessors' Map No. 142, supposed to be owned by Jacob and Armenhouie 
Jacobson. 

Lot 2A of Assessors' Map No. 142, supposed to be owned by Jacob and Armenhouie 
Jacobson. 



75 



Lot 2 of Assessors' Map No. 142, supposed to be owned by Frederic P. Worthen • 
PARCEL B 

Beginning at a point in the westerly side line of Massachusetts Highway Route 
93 at land now or formerly of Joseph Shattuck; thence running nearly westerly 
222 feet, more or less, to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 31; thence northerly 
about 441.70 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 32; thence northwesterly 
about 999.95 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 33; thence nearly westerly 
543 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 34; thence southeasterly about 200 
feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 35; thence southwesterly 170 feet to 
Essex Company Stone Bound No. 36; thence northwesterly about 637 feet to 
Essex Company Stone Bound No. 37; thence southwesterly in a straight line 
about 2525 feet to Essex Company Stone Bound No. 40 at land of the Andover 
Village Improvement Society; thence northwesterly by said land of Andover 
Village Improvement Society to the Merrimack River; thence generally easterly 
by the Merrimack River to a point in the westerly line of Massachusetts High- 
way Route 93; thence southerly by said westerly line of said Highway to the 
point of beginning. 

Said Parcel B is composed of the following lots, or parts thereof, proceeding 
from east to west: 

Lot 4 of Assessors' Map No. 165 supposed to be owned by River Road Realty 
Trust. 

Lot 2 of Assessors' Map No. 187, supposed to be owned by John Asoian and 
Harry Loosigian. 

2. A strip of land approximately 20 feet wide and 1978 feet long extending from 
River Road to Lot 2 of Assessors' Map 125, being shown as Lot 2 of Assessors' 
Map 126 supposed to be owned by Anna P. Heffron. 

3. Lot 3 of Assessors' Map 121 supposed to be owned by John L. and Grace L. Cyr. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 37 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $100,000.00 to be raised by taxation and it was fur- 
ther moved that the Article be supplemented by the addition of the following words: 

"and to authorize the Selectmen to grant, without consideration, easements, 
private or otherwise, allowing the installation and maintenance of under- 
ground pipes across the said lands and the placing of pumps on the said 
lands. " 

The Vote — YES 330, NO 24 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A quorum was present. 
A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mrs. James Keck. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $10,000 to be 
used for the construction of a dam or dams across the outflows of Pomp's Pond, and 
for pumping water into the pond, and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the 
necessary easements for raising the pond level by gift, by purchase or by seizure 
by right of eminent domain. The person whose land would be affected by the ease- 
ments is supposed to be Girl Scout Council of Greater Lawrence. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town raise and appropriate 
$10,000 by taxation to be used for the construction of a dam or dams across the out- 
flows of Pomp's Pond, and for pumping water into the pond. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mrs. James Keck. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Manager to apply for 
State and Federal Funds which may be available for co nstructing improvements at 
Pomp's Pond and the land surrounding that pond. 

76 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 39 as printed in the 
Warrant . 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $350,000 to acquire and 
develop for Municipal Off-Street Parking purposes land bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the northeasterly corner thereof at the southeasterly corner of land 
of Merrimack Valley National Bank and the westerly side of Main Street, thence pro- 
ceeding southerly by the westerly side of Main Street 135.62' to land now or for- 
merly of William R. Hill, thence turning and proceeding westerly by land of said 
Hill 98.55', thence turning and proceeding southerly by land of said Hill and land 
of Andover Savings Bank 45.92'; thence turning and proceeding westerly by land of 
said bank 87.01' to land now or formerly of Eleanor D. Doyle, thence continuing 
westerly across land of Eleanor D. Doyle 88' more or less to a point at land now or 
formerly of Josephine McDonald, thence turning and proceeding northerly 70' more or 
less by land of said Josephine McDonald to land now or formerly of Edith D. Sweeney 
and Miriam Sweeney McArdle, thence turning and proceeding southwesterly by the last 
named land 19' more or less to land of John D. and Wilma M. Glancy, thence turning 
and proceeding northwesterly by land of said Glancys 126.25' to the southeasterly 
side of Central Street, thence turning and proceeding northeasterly by the south- 
easterly side of Central Street 62.50' to land now or formerly of John J. McArdle, 
Jr. et ux, thence turning and proceeding southeasterly by said land of McArdle 
109.22', thence turning and proceeding northeasterly by land of said McArdle 107.46' 
to land now or formerly of Merrimack Valley National Bank, thence turning and pro- 
ceeding northeasterly by land of said bank 156.34' to the point of beginning. 

And to originally construct and surface on such land a municipal off-street park- 
ing area; and to determine how the sum will be raised by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing; to authorize 
the Selectmen to accept gifts of money to supplement the appropriated funds to be 
used for the same purposes; to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the fee by pur- 
chase, by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain, or take any other action 
relative thereto. Betterments may be assessed. 

The persons whose lands will be affected are supposed to be Andover Savings Bank, 
Eleanor D. Doyle, Edith D. Sweeney, Miriam Sweeney McArdle, Jaycole Realty Corpora- 
tion. 

Article 40 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation, 
transfer from available funds, or by borrowing, or by any combination of the fore- 
going the sum of $50,000.00 for the construction of sewer mains in Wild Rose Drive 
and connecting to existing Town sewers in Argilla Road and Wild Rose Drive for a 
distance of 1800 feet more or less; said construction to be done under the better- 
ment act; and to authorize the Town to acquire easements by release, by purchase or 
by right of eminent domain across the following land supposed to be owned by the 
following : 

Lot 9 of Assessors' Map 111, Edward R. & Nancy Hostetter 

Lot 12 of Assessors' Map 111, Harold C. & Lois B. Longendorfer 

Lot 31 of Assessors' Map 111, James N. & Ann J. Gillen 

or take any other action relative thereto, on petition of Francis H. McParland, Jr. 
and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 41 as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $50,000.00 from taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mrs. James Keck. 



77 



ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds $5,000 for the celebration of the 325th anniversary of 
the incorporation of the Town, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 42 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $5,000 from taxation. The Vote — YES 277, NO 27. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer 
from available funds the following sums to pay the following bills: 

(a) Kenneth P. Thompson Co., Inc. $11.95 for supplies purchased by the Dog 
Officer in March of 1968. 

(b) John J. McArdle, Jr., M. D. , $135.00 for services rendered in 1967 in 
connection with injuries sustained by a Police Officer while on duty. 

(c) Transglobal Steel Co., Inc. $1,919.83 for automotive parts and supplies 
furnished the Department of Public Works during 1969. 

(d) J. A. Leone & Sons, Inc. $264.25 for fuel oil delivered to Memorial Hall 
Library — insufficient funds to cover payment. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 43 as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $2,331.03 from taxation. 

ARTICLE 44. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the following 
balances be lapsed and returned to Surplus Revenue: 



ARTICLE 10, 1964 Establish Boundaries 
ARTICLES 21, 22,) 

23 1964) Land Acquisition 

ARTICLE 11, 1968 Forest Fire Truck 

ARTICLE 14, 1968 Voting Machines 

ARTICLE 5B, 1968 Student Activities 

ARTICLE 28, 1966 Sewer-Wild Rose and Holly Terrace 

ARTICLE 29, 1966 Sewer-Shipman Road 

ARTICLE 7, 1967 Water Drainage Improvements 

ARTICLE 6B, 1968 Repairs to Railroad Bridge 

ARTICLE 18, 1968 Fencing at New High School 

ARTICLE 27, 1968 MBTA Train Service 

ARTICLE 28, 1968 MBTA Bus Service 



132.91 

2.51 

7.00 

1.71 

40.00 

2,151.96 

3,132.20 

1,313.17 

1,525.00 

1,668.08 

3,435.23 

1,100.00 



ARTICLE 45. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use 
in free cash to reduce the 1970 tax rate and to offset appropriations voted at the 
1970 Town Meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to permit the Assessors to use $380,000.00 
in Free Cash to reduce the 1970 tax rate and to offset appropriations voted at the 
1970 Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to rezone from Shopping Center District 
to Single Residence C the following parcel of land: 

A certain parcel of land in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, bounded and 
described as follows: 

Beginning at the point of intersection of the Andover-Tewksbury town line with 
the southerly side line of Lowell Street and running in a northeasterly direc- 
tion, N83° 32' 10"E 109.81 feet to a county bound; thence still by said Lowell 
Street N89Q 51' 00"E 736.86 feet to a county bound; thence still by said Lowell 
Street, in a southeasterly direction by a curved line having a radius of 2,000 
feet and a length of 152.72 feet to a county bound; thence still by said Lowell 



78 



Street S 85° 46' 30"E 646.30 feet to a point of land of John D. and Vera M. Mac- 
Donald, Trustees of 133 Realty Trust; thence by said land of 133 Realty Trust by 
two courses as follows: S18° 04' 42"E 271.68 feet, S15° 13' 34"E 652.58 feet to 
a bound; thence by said land of said 133 Realty Trust by four courses as follows: 
N76° 30' 30"E 92.56 feet, N81Q 37' 50"E 109.91 feet, N81<> 24' 10"E 134.28 feet, 
N81° 46' 40"E 203.71 feet to a bound in the wall at the land now or formerly of 
Edith W. Leighton; thence by a stone wall along land of said Leighton in eight 
courses, as follows: S09° 49' 00"E 182.56 feet, S09° 34' 40"E 155.07 feet, 
S07° 26' 40"E 94.31 feet, S03° 07 ' 30"E 120.47 feet, S04<> 25' 20"E 115.98 feet, 
S640 16' 20"W 12.27 feet, S24° 14' 10"E 101.66 feet, S24° 33' 10"E 69.24 feet 
to a point at the Andover-Tewksbury town line; thence by said Andover-Tewksbury 
town line N57° 09' 09"W 3066.29 feet to the south side of Lowell Street and 
point of beginning. The above described land contains 31.40 acres, more or 
less, as calculated from plans dated June 1, 1956 and January 10, 1966, 
scale 1"=100 feet, prepared by Dana F. Perkins and Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers 
and Surveyors, Reading, Massachusetts. 

Before action was taken on this article, upon motion made and duly seconded, it 
was VOTED to admit six more non-voters. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to rezone from Shopping Center District to 
Single Residence C the following parcel of land: 

A certain parcel of land in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, bounded and 
described as follows: 

Beginning at the point of intersection of the Andover-Tewksbury town line 
with the southerly side line of Lowell Street and running in a northeast- 
erly direction, N83° 32' 10"E 109.81 feet to a county bound; thence still 
by said Lowell Street N89° 51' 00"E 736.86 feet to a county bound; thence 
still by said Lowell Street, in a southeasterly direction by a curved line 
having a radius of 2,000 feet and a length of 152.72 feet to a county 
bound; thence still by said Lowell Street S85° 46' 30"E 646.30 feet to a 
point at land of John D. and Vera M. MacDonald, Trustees of 133 Realty 
Trust; thence by said land of 133 Realty Trust by two courses as follows: 
S18° 04' 42"E 271.68 feet, S15° 13' 34"E 652.58 feet to a bound; thence by 
said land of said 133 Realty Trust by four courses as follows: N76° 30' 
30"E 92.56 feet, N81© 37' 50"E 109.91 feet, N81© 24' 10"E 134.28 feet, 
N81° 46' 40"E 203.71 feet to a bound in the wall at the land now or former- 
ly of Edith W. Leighton; thence by a stone wall along land of said Leighton 
in eight courses, as follows: S09° 49' 00"E 182.56 feet, S09O 34' 4 "e 
155.07 feet, S07° 26' 40"E 94.31 feet, S03° 07' 30"E 120.47 feet, S04<> 25' 
20"E 115.98 feet, S64° 16' 20"W 12.27 feet, S24° 14' 10"E 101.66 feet, S24° 
33' 10"E 69.24 feet to a point at the Andover-Tewksbury town line; thence 
by said Andover-Tewksbury town line N57° 09' 09"W 3066.29 feet to the south 
side of Lowell Street and point of beginning. The above described land con- 
tains 31.40 acres, more or less, as calculated from plans dated June 1, 1956 
and January 10, 1966, scale: 1"-100 feet, prepared by Dana F. Perkins and 
Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers and Surveyors, Reading, Massachusetts. 

The Vote YES 231, NO 65 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A quorum was present, 
A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King in opposition to this 
article. 

At this time, a quorum was questioned. A count was taken and showed 308 voters 
present, less than the required number of 350. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 5:25 P. M. until 
Wednesday evening, March 11 at 7:30 P. M. in the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet 
Street. 



79 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING, MARCH 11, 1970 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 440 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:50 P.M., 
having been adjourned from Saturday, March 7, 1970 at 5:25 P. M. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence A to 
General Business, the following described parcels of land identified as Lot 88 and 
89 on Assessors' Map #55, the same being bounded and described as follows: 

Parcel 1. Being Lot numbered six (6) as shown on plan of "Land of the Andover 
Associates dated May 1923 drawn by Horace Hale Smith C. E." recorded with North 
District of Essex Registry of Deeds, Book 476, Page 600, and more particularly 
bounded and described as follows: 

EASTERLY: one hundred eighty-five and 61/100 (185.61) feet by Lot 
numbered five (5) as shown on said plan; 

SOUTHERLY: sixty and 8/10 (60.8) feet by Chestnut Street; 

WESTERLY: one hundred thirty-six and 11/100 (136.11) feet by Lot 
numbered seven (7) as shown on said plan; 

NORTHWESTERLY: sixty-eight and 55/100 (68.55) feet by land now or for- 
merly of one Sweeney; and 

NORTHEASTERLY: nine (9) feet by land now or formerly of the Andover 
National Bank, said bound being along the center of 
Rogers Brook, so called. 

Parcel 2. Being the westerly fifteen (15) feet of Lot numbered five (5) on 
said plan above referred to and more particularly bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the Southwest corner of the granted premises in the Northerly line 
of Chestnut Street at a point which is two hundred twenty-two and 92/100 (222.92) 
feet west of its intersection with the westerly line of Main Street at land of 
the grantor; thence Northerly by said land of the grantor, the same being Lot 
numbered six (6) on said plan to a point in the center of Rogers Brook by land 
of the Andover National Bank one hundred eighty-five and 61/100 (185.61) feet; 
thence easterly by a line running through the center of Rogers Brook by land 
now or formerly of the Andover National Bank seventeen and 2/10 (17.2) feet to 
land now or formerly of the Knights of Columbus Building Association of Ando- 
ver; thence southerly by the remaining portion of Lot numbered five (5) on 
said plan one hundred seventy-nine and 61/100 (179.61) feet to Chestnut Street; 
thence westerly by said Chestnut Street fifteen and 2/10 (15.2) feet to the 
point of beginning, containing 2739.15 square feet more or less, on petition 
of Eleanor D. Doyle and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to change from Single Residence 
A to General Business, the following described parcels of land identified as Lot 88 
and 89 on Assessors' Map #55, the same being bounded and described as follows: 

Parcel 1 . Being Lot numbered six (6) as shown on plan of "Land of the Andover 
Associates dated May 1923 drawn by Horace Hale Smith C. E." recorded with North 
District of Essex Registry of Deeds, Book 476, Page 600, and more particularly 
bounded and described as follows: 

EASTERLY: one hundred eighty-five and 61/100 (185.61) feet by Lot num- 
bered five (5) as shown on said plan; 



80 



SOUTHERLY: sixty and 8/10 (60.8) feet by Chestnut Street; 

WESTERLY: one hundred thirty-six and 11/100 (136.11) feet 

by Lot numbered seven (7) as shown on said plan; 

NORTHWESTERLY: sixty-eight and 55/100 (68.55) feet by land now 
or formerly of one Sweeney; and 

NORTHEASTERLY: nine (9) feet by land now or formerly of the 
Andover National Bank, said bound being along 
the center of Rogers Brook, so-called. 

Parcel 2. Being the westerly fifteen (15) feet of Lot numbered five (5) on 
said plan above referred to and more particularly bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the Southwest corner of the granted premises in the Northerly line 
of Chestnut Street at a point which is two hundred twenty-two and 92/100 (222.92) 
feet west of its intersection with the westerly line of Main Street at land of 
the grantor; thence Northerly by said land of the grantor, the same being Lot 
numbered six (6) on said plan to a point in the center of Rogers Brook by land 
of the Andover National Bank one hundred eighty-five and 61/100 (185.61) feet; 
thence Easterly by a line running through the center of Rogers Brook by land 
now or formerly of the Andover National Bank seventeen and 2/10 (17.2) feet to 
land now or formerly of the Knights of Columbus Building Association of Ando- 
ver; thence SOUTHERLY by the remaining portion of Lot numbered five (5) on 
said plan one hundred seventy-nine and 61/100 (179.61) feet to Chestnut Street; 
thence Westerly by said Chestnut Street fifteen and 2/10 (15.2) feet to the 
point of beginning, containing 2739.15 square feet more or less. 

A quorum was present. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold 
King. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning District boundaries 
so that those parcels of land belonging to Michael J. DiBitetto and Ethel DiBitetto 
and illustrated on the Assessors' Map 128, Lot 29; Map 128, Lot 29A and Map 128, 
Lot 23 be included in the Industrial A District, on petition of Michael J. DiBitetto 
and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw so 
that parcels of land belonging to Michael DiBitetto and shown on Town Map 128, Lots 
29 and 29A be rezoned from Residential to Industrial A. 

A quorum was present. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold 
King. 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to the exchange of land with George Chon- 
gris of Andover, said land being located on the westerly side of Greenwood Road and 
being shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. made for J. C. Ryan, 
Inc., Scale 1"=200 T , March 1965, Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Land Surveyor," and said 
exchange to involve the transfer by the Town to George Chongris of the unpaved and 
unused portion of Greenwood Road along its westerly boundary, and the transfer by 
George Chongris to the Town of approximately four acres of land to the west of the 
zone setback line as shown on the aforementioned plan, on the petition of Allen S. 
Young and others. 

A legal question was involved in Article 49 so the Moderator called for the vote 
to be counted. The Vote YES 211, NO 154. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way, and name 
River Street in accordance with a plan entitled, "Plan of River Street, Andover, 
Mass. as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, Town of Andover, Massachusetts, Scale 
1"=40' January, 1970, Harry R. Feldman, Boston, Mass." on file at the office of the 

81 



Town Clerk; and to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, 
by purchase, or seizure by right of eminent domain, over the parcels of land shown 
on said plan; and to use some of the road construction funds appropriated under 
Article 4 of the Warrant of the Town Meeting held August, 1967, and to appropriate 
by transfer, the unexpended funds voted under Article 7 of the Warrant of the 
Annual Town Meeting of March, 1969 for the awarding of damages, if any, by the 
Board of Selectmen from the taking of land and for the construction of roadway im- 
provements, said road having been in open, adverse, uninterrupted use by the public 
for over fifty years. The names of the owners of land supposed to be affected by 
this article are: 



MAP NO. 


LOT NO. 


139 


59 


139 


60 


139 


60A 


139 


63 


139 


64 


139 


71 


139 


73 & 74 


139 


117 


139 


144 


140 


21 


140 


22 


140 


24 


140 


52 


140 


53 


140 


54 


139 


67 & 147 


139 


68 


139 


69 


139 


70 


139 


148 & 149 


140 


25 


140 


26 


140 


32 


140 


33 


140 


35 


140 


36 


140 


37,40,42,&49 


140 


38 


140 


39 


140 


41 


140 


48 


140 


50 


140 


52 


141 


2 


141 


3 


160 


8 



1700 Estate Trust 

Roman Catholic Church 

John Doe 

Nelson & Eva Townsend 

Francis J. & Mary L. Riley 

Louis E. Seiferth 

Robert C. & Alida A. Corry 

D. & F. Real Estate Trust 

George W. & Mildred I. Davison 

Earle H. & Clotilde E. Hunt 

David L. & Elaine Doucette 

Herbert T. & Elaine F. Peterson 

Forrest J. Bussell 

James J. & Ann E. Eldred 

Charles H. & Mary F. Jacobson 

Katherine M. Quinn 

Saul Dearborn (Tax Title) 

Mary McCabe (Tax Title) 

Esther G. Corcoran et al 

Howard L. & Mary C. Colbath 

Lewis P. & Attley M. Nason 

Clyde A. & Jocelyn A. White 

Eugene L. & Kathleen A. Pimpare 

Robert G. & Rose M. Northup 

Charles R. & Agnes M. Coolidge 

Henry C. & Mary L. Burbine 

Theodore Mikulewicz 

Marjorie L. Coombs, Agnes M. Grove 

James C. Stearns Sr . & Mary R. 

James F. & Helen M. Fereira 

William R. Ballou 

Robert, Jr. & Elizabeth A. Mills 

Forrest J. Bussell 

John J. & Timothy F. Cronin 

Bette Brooks 

Henry W. & Victolia S. Wrigley 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 50 as printed in the 
warrant. The Vote — YES 290, NO 31 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-laws, Article VII, 
Building Code, Section 37, by adding the following new Paragraph (d) : 

(d) There must be installed in every duelling containing two or more 
apartments or any garden type apartments hereafter altered or 
erected combination heat activated and smoke sensored warning 
devices. 

The type, number and locations are to be determined by the Inspector of Buildings. 



82 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to amend the Town By-laws, 
Article VII, Building Code, Section 37, by adding the following new Paragraph (d) : 

(d) There must be installed in every dwelling containing two or more 
apartments or any garden type apartments hereafter altered or 
erected combination heat activated and smoke sensored warning 
devices . 

The type, number and locations are to be determined by the Inspector of Buildings. 

A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend Paragraph 1 of Section 4 of 
the Andover Building Code which has been adopted as part of the By Laws of the Town 
by striking that paragraph and substituting for it the following: 

1. The National Building Code, hereinafter referred to as the "National 
Code", shall be construed to be the issue of year 1967 as it may 
from time to time be amended or supplemented. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to amend Paragraph 1 of Sec- 
tion 4 of the Andover Building Code which has been adopted as part of the By Laws of 
the Town by striking that paragraph and substituting for it the following: 

1. The National Building Code, hereinafter referred to as the "National 
Code", shall be construed to be the issue of year 1967 as it may 
from time to time be amended or supplemented. 

A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way "Serenity 
Lane" as approved by the Planning Board and the "Board of Selectmen", as shown on a 
plan entitled, Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts. -Subdivided for William Tur- 
ner, dated February 1968 - Scale 1"=40', Engineer, Raymond G. Mansour, Andover, 
Massachusetts, said plan being recorded in the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as plan number 5884. Said plan and description for recording purposes filed 
with the Town Clerk, on petition of William Turner and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 53 as 
printed in the warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold 
King. 

ARTICLE 54 . To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way, 
and name Twin Brooks Circle, as approved by the Planning Board as shown on a plan 
entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan Elysian Fields, Sect. II, Subdivider Cam- 
panelli Builders, Inc., Engineer, Bradford Saivetz & Associates, Inc., dated Sept . 30 , 
1965", recorded in Essex North District Deeds as Plan #5428, copies of said plan and 
description of said street along with drainage and utility easements for recording 
purposes being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Arthur A. Collins and 
others . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 54 as 
printed in the warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold 
King. 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a public way, 
and name Elysian Drive, as approved by the Planning Board as shown on a plan en- 
titled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan Elysian Fields, Section II, Subdivider Cam- 
panelli Builders, Inc., Engineer, Bradford Saivetz & Associates, Inc., dated Sept. 30, 
1965", recorded in Essex North District Deeds as Plan #5428, copies of said plan and 
description of said street along with drainage and utility easements for recording 
purposes being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Arthur A. Collins and 
others. 



83 



Article 55 was defeated. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by 
Harold King recommending postponement of this article. 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Dean 
Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Select- 
men, as shown on a plan entitled, "Subdivision Plan of Land located in Andover, Mass. 
owned by Chongris Bros., Scale 1"=40', May, 1968, Charles E. Cyr, Civil Engineer, 
Lawrence, Mass." and shown as Plan #5897, filed with the North Essex Registry of 
Deeds: The plan and description, along with easements filed with the Town Clerk, on 
petition of William H. Henderson and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 56 as 
printed in the warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold 
King. 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Gemini Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on Sheet Four of four sheets on a plan entitled, "River Ridge 
Estates", dated February 23, 1965 owned by J. C. Ryan Const., Inc., Scale 1"=40', 
E. Conrad Levy & Assoc. Surveyors and Engineer, and shown as Plan No. 5339 filed 
with North Essex Registry of Deeds: The Plan and description along with easements 
filed with the Town Clerk, on petition of William H. Henderson and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 57 as printed in the 
warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Appollo Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on Sheet One of four sheets on a plan entitled, "River Ridge 
Estates", dated February 23, 1965 owned by J. C. Ryan Const., Inc., Scale 1"=40', 
E. Conrad Levy and Assoc. Surveyors and Engineer, and shown as Plan No. 5339 filed 
with North Essex Registry of Deeds: The Plan and description along with easements 
filed with the Town Clerk, on petition of William H. Henderson and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 58 as printed in the 
warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Mer- 
cury Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on Sheet Three of four sheets on a plan entitled, "River Ridge 
Estates", dated February 23, 1965 owned by J. C. Ryan Const., Inc., Scale 1"=40', 
E. Conrad Levy & Assoc. Surveyors and Engineer, and shown as Plan No. 5339 filed 
with North Essex Registry of Deeds: The Plan and description along with easements 
filed with the Town Clerk, on petition of William H. Henderson and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 59 as printed in the 
warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Launching Road as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on two plans one comprising four sheets and entitled, "River 
Ridge Estates" dated February 23, 1965 owned by J. C. Ryan Const. Inc., Scale 1"=40', 
E. Conrad Levy & Assoc. Surveyors and Engineer, and shown as Plan No. 5339, filed 
with North Essex Registry of Deeds, and the other plan entitled "River Ridge Estates, 
Sec. 2" owned by J. C. Ryan Const. Inc., dated February 23, 1967, Scale 1"=50', Pem- 
broke Land Survey and Realty Company, Surveyor and shown as Plan No. 5722 filed with 
North Essex Registry of Deeds: The Plans and descriptions, along with easements 
filed with the Town Clerk, on petition of William H. Henderson and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 60 be amended to approve 
Launching Road from River Road through its intersection with Gemini Circle as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by 
Harold King. 



84 



ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way Whispering 
Pine Drive as approved by the Planning Board and the Board of Selectmen, as shown 
on a plan entitled "Whispering Pine Drive", owned by Sidney P. White, dated Septem- 
ber 22, 1967, Scale 1"=40', Engineer, Clinton F. Goodwin, Haverhill, Mass. said plan 
being recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 5792; plan 
and description for recording purposes filed with the Town Clerk, on petition of 
Sidney P. White and others. 

Article 61 was defeated. A report of the Andover Planning Board recommending this 
article was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Dog Control Law so that all 
dogs be restrained during those hours in which children are commuting to and from 
school. Suggested hours are 7:00 A.M. -8:30 A.M., 11:30-12:30 Noon, and 2:30-4:00 P.M. 
on petition of Linda L. Tober and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to amend the dog by-law adopted under the 
provisions of Article 38 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of Marc h, 1969 
by adding as a general paragraph at the end of Section 13 entitled: RESTRAINT OF 
DOGS: All dogs must be restrained during the hours 7:00 A.M. to 8:30 A.M.- 
11:30 A.M. to 12:30 Noon, and 2:30 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday of each 
week, effective beginning the day after Labor Day next and ending June 30th of each 
year . 

The Vote — YES 181, NO 142. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 63. To act upon the report of the TOWN OFFICERS. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Annual Report of the Town of 
Andover for 1969 as prepared and submitted by the Town Manager be received and 
filed. 

ARTICLE 64. To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

Upon motion made by Mr. Bowen and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town meet- 
ing direct the Board of Selectmen forthwith: To investigate, formulate and recom- 
mend to the October Special Town Meeting, or sooner, or undertake independent lead- 
ership action in developing a program for a community goals plan and committee 
which plan and committee shall address themselves to the future economic goals, 
human needs, physical environment and government requirements of the Town of Ando- 
ver. 

The above broad goal areas to include such other sub-sections that would be appro- 
priate or necessary in the development of long range community goals and both long- 
range and short-range community objectives but shall include: 

ECONOMIC GOALS : Commerce, industry, agriculture, man-power resources. 

HUMAN NEEDS : Housing, education, health, personal safety, social welfare, 
leisure time and youth affairs. 

PHYSICAL Urban form, aesthetics, conservation, public facilities, 
ENVIRONMENT : community development, transportation. 

GOVERNMENT Inter-governmental coordination, governmental services and 
REQUI REMENT S : resources, community relations and involvement, public 
utilities. 

The Committee to be of such size so as to be broadly representative of the com- 
munity as well as to the tasks at hand in developing the goals and objectives. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, the Moderator allowed Article 21 to be recon- 
sidered. Action on this article recorded after Article 20. A report of the Ando- 
ver Planning Board was read. 

85 



At this time, Chairman Watters of the Board of Selectmen called for a rising vote 
of thanks to Mr. Donald C. Bassett, Superintendent of the Water and Sewer Department, 
for his many years of fine work done for the Town. Mr. Bassett 's resignation will 
be effective on March 31, 1970. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 10:22 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



IRVING 0. PIPER 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 5, 1970 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, August 28, 1970, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs met and assembled in the 
Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street on Monday, the fifth day of October, 1970 at 
7:30 P. M. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:35 P. M. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 686 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

Opening prayer was offered by the Reverend Charles A. Fowlie, Minister of the 
United Church of Ballardvale. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman William Stewart. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit eight non-voters. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the reading of the warrant 
and the return of service of the Constable be dispensed with. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator refer to the 
articles by number and by subject matter. 

ESSEX, SS. October 5, 1970 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Thomas P. Eldred, Constable 



86 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will appropriate from available funds the sum of 
$25,000 to be added to the sums appropriated under item 105 entitled "Compensation 
Plan" of Article 4 of the Warrant of the 1970 Annual Town Meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 1 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant, in the amount of $25,000 from available funds. This article had the 
unanimous approval of the Finance Committee. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the 
sum of $4,000.00 for the purchase of a motor vehicle and accessories for the Fire 
Department . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 2 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant, in the amount of $4,000 from available funds. This article had the un- 
animous approval of the Finance Committee. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the use of $3,500.00 of the 
funds appropriated under Article 24 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of 

1969 for improvements and alterations in the town garage and improvements and altera- 
tions in the property acquired from Hill under power granted by vote on Article 33 

of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of 1970. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 3 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. The report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from funds appropriated under 
Article 8 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of 1969, the sum of $24,132.50, 
being the unexpended balance of funds appropriated under that Article, to be added to 
the funds appropriated under Article 50 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of 

1970 for improvements to River Street, and, further, to authorize the Selectmen to 
use up to $7,500.00 of said sum to acquire by purchase, by gift or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain for highway purposes all or a part of a parcel of land with 
buildings thereon at the intersection of Andover Street and River Street (Ballard- 
vale) and shown on Assessors' Map 139, Lot 59 and supposed to be owned by Fred E. 
Cheever, Walter Kimball and C. Lincoln Giles, Trustees of 1700 Estate Trust, and to 
raze or dispose of all or any part of said buildings. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that Article 4 be approved as 
printed in the Warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the 
sum of $12,500 for the installation of a sanitary sewer in Lupine Road beginning at 
Central Street and extending northeasterly approximately 500 feet. Betterments are 
to be assessed. 

Article 5 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by changing 
from General Industrial to Industrial A, the following described parcel of land: 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Haverhill Street and Riverina 
Road and proceeding northerly along the center line of Riverina Road to a point on 
the easterly extension of the southerly line of Lot 5 (Assessors' Map #52); thence 
easterly along said easterly extension to the center line of Shawsheen River; thence 
downstream along the center line of the Shawsheen River to the southeasterly right 
of way line of Interstate Route 495; thence northerly and northeasterly by said right 
of way line, to the center line of the Boston & Maine Railroad right of way; thence 
southerly along said center line to the center line of Haverhill Street (Assessors' 
Map #35) ; thence westerly along the center line of Haverhill Street to the point of 
beginning. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
changing from General Industrial to Industrial A, the following described parcel of 

87 



land: 

Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Haverhill Street and Riverina 
Road and proceeding northerly along the center line of Riverina Road to a point on 
the easterly extension of the southerly line of Lot 5 (Assessors' Map #52); thence 
easterly along said easterly extension to the center line of Shawsheen River; thence 
downstream along the center line of the Shawsheen River to the southeasterly right 
of way line of Interstate Route 495; thence northerly and northeasterly by said 
right of way line, to the center line of the Boston & Maine Railroad right of way; 
thence southerly along said center line to the center line of Haverhill Street 
(Assessors' Map #35); thence westerly along the center line of Haverhill Street to 
the point of beginning. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. A quorum was 
present . 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to rezone those portions of Lots 4, 8 
and 9 as shown on Town Assessors' Map 126 from Single Residence C to Industrial A, 
extending the Industrial A boundary to the centerline of River Road, on the peti- 
tion of Russell G. Doyle, Bernard Magane, Francis Reilly and others. 

Article 7 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the jurisdiction and con- 
trol of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 8-c, as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following 
described land of the Town of Andover and fronting on the Shawsheen River and to 
authorize the Selectmen to grant, without consideration, easements, private or 
otherwise, allowing the installation and maintenance of underground pipes across 
the said lands and the placing of pumps on the said lands: 

1) Lot 10 of Assessors' Map 183 (Lowell Junction) 

2) Lot 10A of Assessors' Map 183 (Lowell Junction) 

3) Lot 10B of Assessors' Map 183 (Lowell Junction) 

4) Lot 13 of Assessors' Map 183 (Lowell Junction) 

5) Lot 51 of Assessors' Map 140 (Ballardvale) 

6) Lot 52A of Assessors' Map 140 (Ballardvale) 

on petition of Harold R. Rafton and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer to the jurisdiction and con- 
trol of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 8-c, as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following 
described land of the Town of Andover and fronting on the Shawsheen River and to 
authorize the Selectmen to grant, without consideration, easements, private or 
otherwise, allowing the installation and maintenance of underground pipes across 
the said land and the placing of pumps on the said lands: 

1) Lot 10 of Assessors' Map 183 (Lowell Junction) 

2) Lot 10A of Assessors' Map 183 (Lowell Junction) 

3) Lot 13 of Assessors' Map 183 (Lowell Junction) 

4) Lot 51 of Assessors' Map 140 (Ballardvale) 

5) Lot 52A of Assessors' Map 140 (Ballardvale) 

excluding those portions of Lots 51 and 52A included within the street layout by 
the Selectmen. 

88 



The Vote — YES 367, NO 209. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by 
Harold King. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Fredric S. O'Brien and duly seconded, it was 
VOTED to take up Article 19 at this time. 

ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town of Andover will vote to transfer to the custody 
and control of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 8c as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following 
described land: 

Lots 10, 10A, 10B and 13 as shown on Assessors' Map #183 and containing 
respectively three (3) acres, two and three-quarters (2 3/4) acres, one (1) 
acre and three (3) acres, more or less 

on petition of Richard J. Bowen and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer to the custody and control of 
the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 8c as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following described 
land: 

Lots 10, 10A, 10B and 13 as shown on Assessors' Map #183 and containing 
respectively three (3) acres, two and three-quarters (2 3/4) acres, one (1) 
acre and three (3) acres, more or less. 

The Vote — YES 392, NO 190. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by 
Harold King. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the 
sum of $15,000 for the purchase of an ambulance and necessary equipment. 

Article 9 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen utilizing 
funds appropriated under Article 32 of the 1970 Annual Town Meeting to acquire by 
purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain for gravel pit purposes 
a parcel of land off Andover Street and shown on Assessors' Map 117, Lot 10 and sup- 
posed to belong to C. Lincoln Giles. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 10 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. The Vote — YES 389, NO 162, voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will appropriate from available funds the sum of 
$7,000.00 to be added to the sums appropriated under Item 91 entitled "Water, Per- 
sonal Services" of Article 4 of the 1970 Annual Town Meeting for the purpose of 
flushing the water distribution system. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 11 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant, in the amount of $7,000 from available funds. 

A majority of the Finance Committee approved this article. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will appropriate from available funds the sum of 
$10,000.00 to be added to the sum appropriated under Item 34 entitled "Fire Depart- 
ment, Other Expenses," of Article 4 of the 1970 Annual Town Meeting for the purpose 
of replacing certain underground fire alarm cables. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 12 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant, in the amount of $10,000 from available funds. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. The Finance 
Committee unanimously approved this article. 

89 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the use of the balance of 
the funds appropriated under Article 18 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of 
1966 now in the amount of $3,627.22 for the planning of improvements to Town athletic 
fields and playgrounds in addition to the planning of improvements to Pomps Pond as 
voted by the 1966 Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 13 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will appropriate from available funds the sum of 
$10,000 for the regrading and restoration of the former Foster gravel pit, so-called, 
lying southerly of Central Street and supposedly owned by Frank Catalano. 

Article 14 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 48, Section 57B under which members of the Fire Department may be excused 
from duty without loss of pay while attending as official delegates Union Conferences 
held within Massachusetts. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 15 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant . 

ARTICLE 16. To receive the report of the Committee appointed by the Moderator un- 
der the vote on Article 31 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of 1970 to 
study the wisdom of changing the date of the annual town meeting and to see if the 
Town will vote to change the by-laws of the town to establish the date of the annual 
town meeting to some other time than that contained in the present by-law. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept the report of the Com- 
mittee and place it on file. 

At this time, the Moderator re-appointed the same Committee to fulfill their own 
recommendations and report at the March, 1971 Annual Town Meeting. 

Mr. Watters, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, thanked the members of the Com- 
mittee for the work they had done on the above report. 

ARTICLE 17. To receive the report of the Selectmen regarding a program for a Com- 
munity Goals Plan, as directed by the vote of the Town on Article 64 of the Warrant 
of the Annual Town Meeting of 1970. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the report of the Board of Selectmen 
be accepted as read and placed on file at the office of the Town Clerk, where copies 
will be made available without charge, to any resident requesting them. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will appropriate from available funds the sum of 
$80,000.00 for the preparation of final plans for an addition to the Doherty Elemen- 
tary School . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 18 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $80,000 from available funds. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David M. Erickson. The Finance 
Committee voted unanimously to allow this article to come before the voters for 
their decision. 

ARTICLE 19 — Taken up out of order after Article 8. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to amend Article XII of the 
Town By-Laws by adding the following: 

Section 11. Periodicals deposited for disposal at the Town of Andover Sanitary 
Landfill shall be bundled in quantities measuring not less than twelve (12) 
nor more than twenty-four (24) inches in thickness and shall be tied securely 
with twine, rope, cloth, wire, plastic or other appropriate material. 

90 






The Town Manager shall take appropriate steps to award a contract or con- 
tracts for salvage rights to said bundled paper to the highest and most 
responsible bidder for a period or periods not to exceed three (3) years; 
provided further that the Town Manager may with the consent of the Board of 
Selectmen grant written permits for salvage rights to said paper to one or 
more Andover-Resident non-profit organizations for a period or periods not 
to exceed one year with no charge to be made for such permits, 

on petition of Richard J. Bowen and others. 

Article 20 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to direct the Board of Select- 
men in consultation with the Town Manager and the Board of Health forthwith to pre- 
pare, to adopt and to implement restrictive policy guide lines concerning the use of 
chlorides for winter snow removal and ice control by the Town Department of Public 
Works and any other agency so as to reduce, eliminate and/or control chloride con- 
tamination of the Town's public water supply sources and storage areas and public 
shade trees, on petition of Richard J. Bowen and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 21 as printed in the 
warrant . 

ARTICLE 22. To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 11:05 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 



ATTEST: 



EL DEN R. SALTER 
Town Clerk 



91 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Bureau of Accounts 
State Office Building, Government Center 

100 Cambridge Street, Boston 02202 



June 25, 1970 

To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. Robert A. Watters, Chairman 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the year ending December 31, 
1969, made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, General 
Laws. This is in the form of a report made to me by Mr. William 
Schwartz, Assistant Chief of Bureau. 



Very truly yours, 



(Sgd.) ARTHUR H. MacKINNON 
Director of Accounts 



AHM:NEM 



92 



Mr. Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 



Sir: 



In accordance with your instructions, I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Andover for the year ending December 31, 1969, and 
submit the following report thereon: 

The records of financial transactions of the several departments receiv- 
ing or disbursing money for the town or committing bills for collection were 
examined and checked with the records of the town treasurer and the town accountant. 

The books and records in the office of the town accountant were examined 
and checked in detail. The receipts, as recorded, were checked with the treasurer's 
books and with the records of the several departments collecting money for the town, 
while the recorded payments were compared with the treasurer's cash book and with 
the treasury warrants. The appropriations, transfers, and loan authorizations, as 
entered, were checked with the town clerk's records of town meeting votes, and with 
the finance committee's records of transfers authorized from the reserve fund. 

An analysis was made of the general and appropriation ledgers, a trial 
balance was taken off, the necessary adjustments resulting from the audit were made, 
and a balance sheet, a copy of which is appended to this report, was prepared show- 
ing the financial condition of the town as of December 31, 1969. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were examined and checked in 
detail. The cash book additions were verified, and the recorded receipts were com- 
pared with the town accountant's books, with the records of the several departments 
collecting money for the town, and with other sources from which money is paid into 
the town treasury. The recorded payments were checked with the approved warrants 
authorizing the treasurer to disburse town funds and with the town accountant's 
records. 

The cash balance on February 17, 1970 was proved by reconciliation of the 
bank balances with statements furnished by the banks of deposit, by inspection of 
the savings bank books, and by verification of the amounts invested in U. S. Treas- 
ury bills. 

The payments on account of maturing debt and interest were verified by 
comparison with the amounts falling due and were checked with the cancelled securi- 
ties and coupons on file. The outstanding bonds and coupons were listed and recon- 
ciled with the balance in the bond and coupon accounts as shown by statements re- 
ceived from the banks of deposit. 

The records of employees' payroll deductions on account of Federal and 
State taxes, purchase of savings bonds, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, group insurance, 
and for the United Fund were examined and checked. The deductions were footed, the 
payments to the proper agencies were verified, and the balances on hand were recon- 
ciled with the respective controlling accounts in the accountant's ledger. 

The records of tax titles and tax possessions held by the town were 
examined and checked in detail. The amounts transferred to the tax title account 
were compared with the collector's records, the reported redemptions and sales of 
tax titles were checked with the treasurer's recorded receipts, and the tax titles 
and tax possessions on hand were listed, reconciled with the town accountant's 

93 



ledger, and checked with the records at the Registry of Deeds. 

The savings bank books and securities representing the investment of the 
several trust, investment, and retirement funds in custody of the town treasurer 
and the treasurers of the John Cornell, Punchard Free School, and the Memorial 
Library funds were examined and listed. The income was proved, the amounts trans- 
ferred to the town were verified, and all transactions were reconciled with the 
books of the town treasurer, the several treasurers of the trustees, and the town 
accountant, and, in the case of the retirement funds, with the records of the re- 
tirement board. 

The cash balances in the several trust and retirement funds on Februa- 
ry 17, 1970 were proved by reconciling the bank balances with statements furnished 
by the banks of deposit. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were examined and checked. 
The taxes, excise, and assessments outstanding at the time of the previous examina- 
tion, together with all subsequent commitment lists, were audited and compared with 
the assessors' warrants issued for their collection. The recorded collections were 
compared with the payments to the treasurer, the abatements, as recorded, were com- 
pared with the assessors' records of abatements granted, the amounts transferred to 
the tax title account were checked with the treasurer's records of tax titles held 
by the town, and the outstanding accounts were listed and reconciled with the 
respective controlling accounts in the accountant's ledger. 

It is again recommended that a determined effort be made to effect a 
settlement of the past due tax and excise accounts which date back to 1959. 

The records of departmental accounts receivable were examined. The pay- 
ments to the treasurer were verified, the abatements were checked, and the outstand- 
ing accounts were listed and reconciled with the accountant's ledger. 

The records of water charges of the public works department were examined 
and checked. The recorded collections were compared with the payments to the treasu- 
rer, the abatements as recorded were verified, and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and reconciled with the accountant's ledger. 

Further verification of the outstanding tax, excise, assessment, depart- 
mental, and water accounts was made by mailing notices to a number of persons whose 
names appeared on the books as owing money to the town, the replies received thereto 
indicating that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The assessors' records of apportioned sewer and water assessments were 
examined and checked. The payments were checked with the treasurer's recorded 
receipts, the apportionments added to the 1969 tax levy were verified, and the ap- 
portioned assessments due in future years were listed and reconciled with the re- 
spective deferred revenue accounts in the town accountant's ledger. 



The financial records of the town clerk pertaining to dog and sporting 
licenses, as well as to receipts on account of town licenses, marriage intentions, 
recording fees, etc., were examined, checked, and compared with the payments to the 
treasurer and to the State. The cash balance was proved by actual count of the cash 
in the office and by reconciliation of the bank balance with a statement furnished 
by the bank of deposit. 

The records of cash receipts of the selectmen, the sealer of weights and 
measures, and the inspectors of building, wires, gas, and plumbing, as well as of 
the police, fire, health, school, and cemetery departments, and of all other depart- 
ments collecting money for the town, were examined and checked. The payments to the 
treasurer were verified by comparison with the treasurer's and the town accountant's 
books, and the cash on hand in the several departments was proved by actual count. 



94 






The surety bonds of the several town officials required to furnish them 
for the faithful performance of their duties were examined and found to be in proper 
form. 

Appended to this report, in addition to the balance sheet, are tables 
showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's cash, summaries of the tax, excise, 
assessment, tax title, tax possession, departmental, and water accounts, as well as 
schedules showing the condition and transactions of the several trust, investment, 
and retirement funds. 

For the cooperation extended by all town officials during the progress of 
the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assistants and for myself, to express apprecia- 
tion. 



Respectfully submitted, 

(SGD.) William Schwartz 
Assistant Chief of Bureau 



WS:NEM 



95 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 

JANUARY 1, 1971 

State Equalized Valuation $200,000,000. 

Borrowing Capacity 5% 10,000,000. 

Town Debt as of December 31, 1970 $13,570,000. 

Less Debt Outside Debt Limit : 

1956-Senior High School (West Jr High) $ 450,000. 

1957-South School 280,000. 

1957-Water-Wells 30,000. 

1961-Sanborn 330,000. 

1963-Accelerated Sewer 540,000. 

1966-New Senior High School 2,925,000. 

1966-Fish Brook 600,000. 

1967-Water Mains-North Street) 

1967-Bancroft Reservoir ) 660,000. 

1967-Bancroft School 1,515,000. 

1967-New Senior High School (Additional) 750,000. 

1968-West Elementary School Addition 2,035,000. 

1968-Water Mains-Industrial Park) 

1968-Water Mains-Bancroft Loop ) 205,000. 

1970-Water Mains-Lowell Street 170,000. $10,490,000.* 

Town Debt Inside Debt Limit $ 3,080,000.** 

Borrowing Capacity as of January 1, 1971 $ 6,920,000. 

Less Debt Inside Debt Limit Appropriations Voted 
but not Bonded : 

1962-Rogers Brook I $ 20,000. 

1967-Land Acquisition Conservation 2,500. 

1967-1969 Public Safety Center 2,000. 

1968-Bancroft Road Sewer 4,000. 

1968-Sewer West Andover 1,545,000. 

1970- (Art. 15) School Land Acquisition 365,000. 

(Art. 10, 1969 rescinded.) 1,938,500. 

Uncommitted Borrowing Capacity as of January 1, 1971 $ 4,981,500. 

Outside Debt Limit Voted but not Bonded: 

Art. 26-1970-Water Treatment Plant $4,000,000. 

Inside Debt Limit Voted but not Bonded: 

1970-School Land Acquisition $ 365,000. 

$80,000. has been borrowed by Notes in 
Anticipation of Bond Issue in 1971 



96 



Town Debt as of December 31, 1970: 



DATE OF BONDS 



OUTSIDE* 



2/1/56 

1/15/57 

11/15/57 

10/1/61 

11/15/63 

4/1/66 

4/1/66 

12/1/67 

12/1/67 

12/1/67 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

7/15/70 



Senior High School (West Junior High) 

South School 

Water-Wells 

Sanborn School 

Accelerated Sewer 

New Senior High School 

Fish Brook 

Water Mains-North Street-Bancroft Reservoir 

Bancroft School 

New Senior High School (Additional) 

West Elementary School Addition 

Water Mains-Industrial Park and Bancroft Loop 

Water Mains-Lowell Street 



450 
280 
30 
330 
540 

2,925 
600 
660 

1,515 
750 

2,035 
205 
170 



,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000. 



$10,490,000, 



DATE OF BONDS 



INSIDE** 



2/1/56 

12/15/60 

12/1/62 

4/1/66 

12/1/67 

4/1/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

7/15/70 

7/15/70 



Senior High School (West Junior High) 

Riverina Sewer 

Rogers Brook I 

Municipal Buildings 

Public Safety Center (Police, Fire, Civil Defense) 

Rogers Brook II 

Sewer : Industrial Park-Bancroft Loop 

Street Construction-Industrial Park 

East Junior High Remodeling 

Land Acquisition-Conservation 

Sewer-Chestnut Street to Summer Street 

Public Safety Center 



50, 

75, 

30, 

855, 

480, 

95, 

475, 

215, 

280, 

210, 

205, 

110, 



000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 
000, 



$ 3,080,000, 



97 



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98 



REVENUE 
GROUP I 
Receipts Included in Assessor's Estimates 

State Distributions & Reimbursements: 
Reimbursements : 

Veterans Benefits 19,7 35.37 

Loss of Taxes 17,571.91 

School Transportation 119,453.77 

School Transportation (Outside) 17,999.19 

School Construction Projects 232,291.24 

School Lunch Program 63,685.76 

Regional Public Library 34,732.06 

Free Public Library 4,283.50 

Vocational Education 2,069.76 

Regional School District Aid 89,459.00 

Natural Resources 53,700.00 

Care of Infants 1,026.15 

Distributions : 

Machinery Basis 67,390.35 

Special Education Programs 

School Aid, Chap. 70 667,553.22 

Chap. 69 & 71 94,283.00 

Valuation Basis 120,419.50 

Special Highway Bond Fund 51,337.35 

Court Fines 2,409.80 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise Taxes: 

Current Year 670,078.80 

Previous Years 88,258.45 758,337.25 

Licenses 

Liquor 9,105.00 

Miscellaneous 6,165.32 15,270.32 

Special Assessments- 

Unapportioned Sewer 10,248.18 

Apportioned Sewer Paid in Advance 2,034.17 

Apportioned Sewer Added to Taxes: 

Current Year 18,483.07 

Previous Years 334.66 

Apportioned Water Paid in Advance 18,838.91 

Apportioned Water Added to Taxes* 

Current Year 1,522.03 

Previous Years 528.16 51,989.18 

General Government: 

Rent - Town Property 1,100.00 

Miscellaneous 2,026.43 3,126.43 

Protection of Persons & Property: 

Ambulance Fees 1,200.00 

Building Inspector 15,145.00 

Electrical Inspector 3,652.45 

Gas Inspector 597.50 

Septic Tank Permits 580.00 

Miscellaneous 3,049.85 24,224.80 

Health & Sanitation: 

Plumbing Inspector 1,800.00 

Miscellaneous 1,145.00 2,945.00 



99 



GROUP I (continued) 

Highways 17,706.45 

Charities : 

Medical Assist - State 634.98 

Veterans Services- 

Reimbursements - Individuals 854.50 

Schools : 

Tuition 15,733.02 

Summer School Tuition 9,290.15 

Rentals 1,005.00 

Miscellaneous 1,344.95 27,373.12 

Libraries : 

Fines & Sales 538.84 

Recreation 89.62 

Public Service Enterprises 

Water Rates 

Water Services & Misc. 

Water Liens added to Taxes,: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 
Cemeteries 
Interest: 

Committed 

Treasury Bills 

Certificates of Deposit 

Savings Accounts 

Taxes & Assessments 
Farm Animal Excise Taxes: 

Current Year 

Previous Years 



GROUP II 

Receipts Not Included in Assessor's Estimates 

Tax Title Redemptions 3,059.23 

Tax Title Costs 327.02 

Dog Funds - Care & Custody 1,153.00 

Insurance Claims 4,648.64 

Workmen's Compensation Reimbursements 544.57 
Refunds : 

Departmental 5,471.54 

Petty Cash 1,630.00 7,101.54 

Chapter 90 - State Aid 14,485.58 

Chapter 90 - County Aid 4,658.33 

Sale of Equipment 785.00 

Miscellaneous 6,438.04 

Andover Housing Authority 1, 876. 00 

45,076.95 



375,417.59 






3,086.63 






11,900.90 






2,301.58 


392,706, 


.70 




7,093, 


.82 


9,549.30 






43,800.42 






64,500.33 






97.17 






11,003.48 


128,950, 


,70 


482.00 






52.50 


534. 


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3,091,777. 


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100 



GROUP III 
Agency and Revenue Accounts 



N. 


D. 


E. 


A. 


N. 


D. 


E. 


A. 


N. 


D. 


E. 


A. 


E. 


S. 


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Personal Property Taxes: 

Current Year 

Previous Years 
Real Estate Taxes: 

Current Year 

Previous Years 
Dog Licenses to County 
Dog Licenses from County 
Title I 
Title III 
Title V 
Title II 
Title I 
Off-Street Parking Meters 
Sale of Dogs 
Public Welfare 

Medical Assistance 
School Lunch Program 
Andover Athletic Association 
Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Cemetery Sale of Lots 
Trust Fund Interest: 

Flower Funds 

Cemetery Perpetual Cares 

Miscellaneous 
Municipal Debt: 

Loans in Anticipation of Bond Issue 

Revenue Anticipation Loans 

Bond Issues 

Bond Issue Premiums 
Revenue Cash Investments 
Non-Revenue Cash Investments 
Payroll Deductions: 

Blue Cross & Blue Shield 

Group Insurance 

Optional Group Insurance 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

United Fund 

Withholding Taxes - Federal 

Withholding Taxes - State 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 
Guarantee Deposits 
Tax Title Escrow 



352,576.20 
4,597.10 

8,345,141.02 
209,835.37 



357,173.30 



8,554,976.39 

4,270.75 

2,471.07 

44,662.00 

2,905.95 

909.50 

941.63 

24,924.90 

1,375.00 

126.00 

952.48 

222,114.62 

10,366.18 

6,145.00 

2,905.00 

351.00 

11,481.08 

3,195.21 

225,000.00 
2,300,000.00 

485,000.00 

1,066.95 

2,859,187.20 

3,265,219.31 

70,103.92 

7,496.02 

9,987.50 

23,522.50 

2,948.56 

1,062,602.79 

204,936.65 

927.75 

100.00 

7,808.36 

19,778,154.57 



RECAPITULATION 



GROUP I 
GROUP II 
GROUP III 



3,091,777.14 

45,076.95 

19,778,154.57 

22,915,008.66 



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116 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 
December 31, 1970 



Employees' Deductions 

Federal Withholding Taxes 

State Withholding Taxes 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 

Group Life Insurance 

United Fund 

Bonds 
N. D. E. A. 

Title I 

Title III 

Title V 

Hi 9 O e J_j e r\ 

Title I 

Title II 
P. L. 874 
County Tax 

State Parks & Reservations 
State Audit of Municipal Accounts 
State Exam, of Retirement System 
State Assessment for Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Elderly Retiree Program 
Trust Funds 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 
Walter Raymond Fund 
Dog Licenses to County 
Sale of Dogs 
Retirement System 
Non-Contributory Pensions 
Petty Cash Advances 
Bond Issue Anticipated Loans 
Revenue Anticipation Loan 
Revenue Cash Investments 
Non-Revenue Cash Investments 
Tax Title Escrow 
Guaranty Deposits - Highway 
Unclaimed Checks 
Refunds : 

Real Estate Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Water Rates 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Miscellaneous 
Insurance Claim Recoveries 
Miscellaneous 



1,057 


,130.85 


205 


,804.27 


69 


,533.32 


17 


,303.80 


4 


,950.82 


20 


,175.00 


24 


,192.58 




3.27 


1 


,930.70 


1 


,843.92 


3 


,943.15 


29 


,527.28 


247 


,195.03 


36 


,507.07 


6 


,532.31 




164.45 


2 


,166.30 


1 


,624.00 


2 


,610.61 


6 


,145.00 




469.42 


4 


,270.75 




126.00 


117 


,215.00 


16 


,908.62 


1 


,630.00 


475 


,000.00 


2,300 


,000.00 


2,992 


,372.33 


2,502 


612.64 


5 


,147.98 




880.00 




3.70 


42 


695.61 


1 


346.50 




506.19 


19 


807.09 




327.45 


1 


830.00 


2 


250.84 



10,224,683.85 



117 



RECAP 



Cash Balances, January 1, 1970: 
General 

Revenue Investments 
Non-Revenue Investments 
Sewer Project 



678,330.00 

1,966,814.87 

1,462,606.67 

4,858.87 



4,112,610.41 



Revenue : 
General 
Increase in Investments 



22,915,008.66 
133,185.13 



23,048,193.79 



27,160,804.20 



Less Expenditures: 
General 

Revolving Accounts 
Agency and Miscellaneous Accounts 
Decrease in Investments 



12,336,418.41 
297,447.70 

10,224,683.85 
762,606.67 



23,621,156.63 



Cash Balances, December 31, 1970: 
General 

Revenue Investments 
Non-Revenue Investments 
Sewer Project 



734,788.70 

2,100,000.00 

700,000.00 

4,858.87 



3,539,647.57 



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123 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded and Article 10, 1955 - High School 500,000.00 

Fixed Debt 13,570,000.00 Article 1, 1957 - South School 280,000.00 

Article 24, 1961 - Sanborn 

School 330,000.00 

Article 1, 1957 - Ballardvale 

& Abbot Wells 30,000.00 

Article 14, 1960 - Sewer 

Trunk Line 75,000.00 

Article 48, 1960 - Roger Brook 30,000.00 
Article 1, 1963 - Sewer APW-46G 540,000.00 
Article 8, 1964 - High School 2,925,000.00 
Article 6, 1965 - Fish Brook 

Project 600,000.00 

Article 11, 1965 - Municipal 

Buildings 855,000.00 

Article 1, 1967 - Bancroft 

School 1,515,000.00 

Article 1, 1966 and Article 

3, 1967 - High School 750,000.00 

Article 13, 1967 - Water System 

Projects 660,000.00 

Article 16, 1967 - Municipal 

Buildings 480,000.00 

Article 3B, 1967 - Rogers Brook 95,000.00 
Article 8B, 1968 and Article 

17, 1968 - West and Bancroft 

Schools 2,035,000.00 

Article 10, 1967 - Land 

Acquisition 210,000.00 

Article 15, 1968 - East Jr. 

High Remodeling 280,000.00 

Article 4C, 1967 - Street 

Construction 215,000.00 

Article 4A, 1967 and Article 

32, 1968 - Water Projects 205,000.00 
Article 4B, 1967 and Article 

16, 1968 - Sewer Projects 475,000.00 
Article 19A and 3B, 1969 - 

Sewer Project Lowell & Summer 

Streets 205,000.00 

Article 5, 1968 and Article 

2B, 1969 - Water Project 

Lowell Street 170,000.00 
Article 14, 1969 - Municipal 
Buildings 110,000.00 

13,570,000.00 13,570,000.00 



124 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 221,695.69 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 
Revenue Due in 1971 to 
1989 Inclusive 221,695.69 



Apportioned Water Assessments 

Not Due 23,461.26 



Suspended Sewer Assessments 10,041.83 



255,198.78 



Apportioned Water Assessments 
Revenue Due in 1971 to 
1987 Inclusive 23,461.26 

Suspended Sewer Assessments 

Revenue 10,041.83 



255,198.78 



125 



ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 
December 31, 1970 



Cash Balance, January 1, 1970 

Merrimack Valley National Bank 

Andover Savings Bank 

Provident Institution for Savings 



24,947.00 

2,001.00 

48,000.00 



74,948.00 



Receipts : 

Payroll Deductions 

Make-up Payments 

Transfers from Other Systems 

Pension Payments from Other Systems 

Government Securities Matured 

Appropriations : 



Town 

Housing Authority 
Investment Income 



Disbursements : 

Administrative Expense: 

Salaries 

Other Expenses 
Refunds 

Annuities Paid 
Pensions Paid 
Purchases of Securities 
Interest on Refunds 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 



117,215.00 
829.00 



4,299.12 
862.63 



108,513.76 

1,382.74 

8,932.76 

3,076.50 

38,687.90 



118,044.00 
51,744.12 



5,161.75 

8,109.01 

25,856.64 

152,755.24 

153,855.23 

85.60 

2,261.88 



330,381.78 



405,329.78 



348,08 5.35 



Cash Balance, December 31, 1970: 
Merrimack Valley National Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 
Provident Institution for Savings 



7,243.43 

2,001.00 

48,000.00 



57,244.43 



126 



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127 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 



ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert A. Watters, Chairman - 1973 

Roger W. Collins, Vice-Chairman - 1971 

William Stewart, Secretary - 1971 

Sidney P. White - 1972 

George E. Heseltine - 1973 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Richard A. Katz , Chairman - 1973 

Virginia Cole - 1971 

Daniel Frishman - 1972 

William F. King - 1971 

Frank Hill, Jr. - 1973 

Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert, Secretary 



TOWN MODERATOR 
Arthur Williams 



TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 
1971 Frederick E. Cheever, 
Chairman - 1973 
Irving J. Whitcomb - 1971 
John M. Murray - 1972 



REGIONAL VOCATIONAL S CHOOL COMMITTEE 
Fred S. Tarbox, Andover - 1973 
John P. Ford, Lawrence 
Joseph F. Sweeney, Lawrence 
Charles J. Keenan, Jr., Lawrence 
John F. Lynch, Methuen 
Thomas F. Clarke, Methuen 
John H. 0' Sullivan, No. Andover 



TRUSTEES, PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
Fred W. Doyle - 1973 
Arthur W. Cole - 1973 
William V. Emmons - 1973 
Malcolm J. Ruhl - 1973 
Harry Sellars - 1973 
Rev. J. Edison Pike 
Rev. J. Everett Bodge 
Rev. Norman E. Dubie, Sr. 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Thomas P. Eldred - 1971 
*Theodore E. Meinelt, Jr. - 1971 
Winston A. Blake - 1973 
Thomas R. Wallace - 1974 
John B. White, Jr. - 1975 

* Appointed by State Housing Board 






APPOINTIVE 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Dr. Albert J. Greenberg , Chairman 

Edward L. Powers, Secretary 

Alexander D. Gibson, Jr. 

Harold T. Cookson 

Arthur Heifetz 

Richard C. MacGowan 

Francis J. Byrne 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Robert S. Zollner, Chairman 
Jerome Andrews, Secretary 
Sherley M. Sweet, Jr. 
Associate Members: 
William V. Emmons 
Robert Domingue 
Virginia Hammond 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
James D. Doherty, Chairman 
Douglas N. Howe, Secretary 
Richard W. Lally 
Eugene A. Bernardin, Jr. 
Arthur A. Collins 



BOARD OF HEAL TH 

Robert A. Walsh, Chairman 

Dr. Wm. R. O'Reilly 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Archibald D. Maclaren, 

Jr. , Chairman 
Phillips B.Marsden, Jr, 
William H. Russell 



TOWLE FUND TRUST 
A. Graham Baldwin 
Mrs. David Duncan, Jr. 
Geoffrey Glendinning 



BOARD OF RETIREMENT 
David L. Nicoll, Chairman 
Leo F. Daley 
Wendell A. Mattheson, Secy 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Thomas P. Brennan 
Harry Sellars 
Eugene A. Zalla 



TRUSTEES-SPRING GROVE 

CEMETERY 

Frederick E. Cheever , Chrmn, 
Malcolm E. Lundgren 
Leo F. Daley 
Irving J. Whitcomb 
Gilbert J. Cromie 



TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Harold T. King 
Frederick Flather, Jr. 
Francis J. Trombly 



CENTRAL MERRIMACK 
VALLEY PLANNING DISTRICT 



Harold T. 
Frederick 



King 

M. Childs, Alt 



128 



PLANNING BOARD 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL 
LIBRARY 



Harold T. King, Chairman Joseph L. Monan, Chairman 

Mrs. James Keck,Vice-Chrm. Mrs. Virginia Hammond , Secy . Frederick S. Allis , Jr . , Chrmn, 

David M. Erickson Mrs. Waters Kellogg Fred G. Arragg, M.D. 

Dr. Wm. E. Haskell Fredric A. Stott Dr. Ernest F. Costello 

John F. Sheehy Edward F. Cregg, Esq. Edward I. Erickson 

Robert M. Henderson Mrs. Richard D. Hornidge 

Ralph Preble Milton E. Prevost 

Mrs . Thayer Warshaw 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Edward A. Gordon, Esq., Chairman 

Mrs. Janet D. Lake 

Michael Morris 

Mrs. Suzanne J. Stephens 

Mrs. Hazel Wilson 

Jason Wright 

Leslie S. Bartow, member ex officio 

DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Wolf Berthold, Chairman 

Horace M. Poynter, Jr., Secretary 

Anthony DiDio 

S. Joseph Hoffman 

Dr. Lawrence Spiegel 

Douglas Anderson 

Irving W. Winn, Jr. 

Thomas W. Tavenner 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 
Benjamin Brown (Am. Legion) 
Gordon Cannon (V.F.W.) 
Elmer S. Ober (Veterans' 

Service Agent) 



DOHERTY SCHOOL ADDITION BUILDING COMMITTEE 

James J. St. Germain, Chairman 

Edward C. Williams, Jr., Secretary 

Mrs. Barbara Cornwell 

James Hamilton 

Milton Issenberg 

Vahey S. Gulezian 

Dante Somma 



ANDOVER CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON HUMAN RESOURCES 



Edwin Bramley 
Michael Brennan 
Everett J. Bodge 
Joseph Dorsey 
Mrs. Rita Dolan 
Mrs. Eugene C. Graves 



George W. Glennie 
Eric E. Halbach 
William Hudson 
William L. Lane 
Miss Irene McCarthy 



GREATER LAWRENCE SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL STUDY COMMITTEE 
Dr. Douglas M. Dunbar 
Joseph W. Odium 
Selectman William Stewart 



WEST ANDOVER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

BUILDING ADDITION COMMITTEE 

James J. St. Germain, Chairman 

Mrs. Barbara Cornwell, Secretary 

John Avery 

S. Abbott Batchelder 

James Hamilton 

Robert W. Hanson 

Neal Mitton 

Joseph W. Watson, Jr. 

Mrs. Leon Wilde 



PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER BUILDING COMMITTEE 

James Hamilton, Chairman 

Harold Rutter, Jr., Secretary 

Douglas C. Anderson 

S. Abbott Batchelder 

Carl R. Fitzgerald 

Vahey S. Gulezian 

Neal L. Mitton 



SITE CONCEPT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Eugene A. Bernardin, Chairman 
Joseph R. Amante 
Mrs. Ann Bedford 
Jean J. Chalifour 
Norman P. Jensen 
Irving L. Newman 
Milton Victor 



AMBULANCE STUDY COMMITTEE 
Dean Webster, Chairman 
Rev. Charles A. Fowlie 
William L. Lane 
William D. Martin 
Dr. Wm. R. O'Reilly 
Mrs. Louise B. Stupack 
Mrs. Hazel G. Wilson 



129 



SOLID WASTE SITE COMMITTEE PLANNING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Joseph W. Odium, Chairman Joseph A. McCarthy 

David Erickson William Dubocq, Jr. 

Edward M. Lenoe William Schlott 
David MacDonald, Jr. 
Harold R. Rafton 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

Roy E. Coombs, Jr., completing unexpired term of Donald C. Bassett as Andover's 

representative for 3 years to October 14, 1971. 



NEW MATERIALS COMMITTEE 
James D. Hamilton 
Arthur Peatman 
Kenneth Wade 



CENTRAL MERRIMACK VALLEY PLANNING 

DISTRICT 

Harold T. King (App't by Planning Board) 
Frederick M. Childs, Alternate 



LAND OVERSEERS FOR CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



HAGGETTS POND RESERVATION 

Mrs. William Beaulieu 

Philip Busby 

Mrs. Virginia Hammond, Chairman 

Mrs. Charles Kirk 

Chester Whitney 

ESSEX RESERVATI ON 

Fredrick A. Stott , Chairman 

M. Lawrence Aitel 

Henry Brouck 

Andrew Campbell 

Paul Gyrsting 

Frank Haggerty 

HUSSEY'S POND & JOYCE TERRACE 
Edward F. Cregg, Esq., Chairman 
Mrs. Claire Bodenrader 
Mrs. Elizabeth Buck 



FISH BROOK RESERVATION 
Mrs. Paul McKinnon 
Paul McKinnon 



CARMEL WOODS RESERVATION 

Mrs. Waters Kellogg, Chairman 

Mrs. William H. Ash 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard C. Cobin 

Mrs. David Darling 

T. Augustine Farragher 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Fox 

FOSTER RESERVATION 
Joseph Monan, Chairman 
Charles Bent ley 
Mrs. Jane Bolton 
John W. Bolton 
Gilbert J. Cromie 



CATALANO-FO S TER RESERVATION 
Ralph Preble, Chairman 
William Cook 
Robert Osborne 
Theodore Reed 

ADVISORY COUNCIL ON COMMUNITY GOALS 

J. Maynard Austin, Town Manager 

Wolf Berthold, Dev . & Indus. Commission 

Dr. Albert J. Greenberg, Finance Committee 

Dr. Richard Katz , School Committee 

Harold T. King, Planning Board 

Joseph L. Monan, Conservation Commission 

Mrs. Elizabeth Nadeau, Board of Health 

Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert, Supt . of Schools 

Robert A. Watters, Chairman, Bd. of Selectmen 

IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED DISTRICT 
J. Maynard Austin 



130 



Animal Inspector .. .Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 

Assessor William Russell 

Civil Defense Director . .Burton Batcheller 
Director of Public Health. . .Eliz . Nadeau, 

R.N. 

Dog Officer Donald Porter 

Fire Chief Henry L. Hilton 

Gas Inspector Walter R. Vogx 

Game Warden Forrest H. Noyes , Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden. .. .James V. Deyermond 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

James E. Manning 

Highway Supt Stanley Chlebowski 

Inspector of Buildings Arthur Peatman 

Inspector of Wires Alex Ritchie 

Asst . Inspector of Wires Arthur Silva 

Memorial Hall Library Director, 

Harry Sagris 

Police Chief David L. Nicoll 

Public Works Director .. .Robert E. McQuade 

Recreation Director Leslie Bartow 

Sanitary & Plumbing 

Inspector Walter R. Vogt 

Asst . Sanitary & 

Plumbing Inspector Harold R. Rutter 



Sanitarian Consultant . .Joseph Barbagalla 
School Department : 
Visual Consultant ... .Wm. V. Emmons, O.D. 

Head Nurse Ruth Westcott 

Physician John J. McArdle,Jr., M.D. 

Attendance Officer Wm. F. Tammany 

Dentist Frank E. Himmer, D.M.D. 

Sealer of Weights & 

Measures Newton A. Jones 

Supt. of Schools.. Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert 

Town Accountant Wendell A. Mattheson 

Town Clerk Elden R. Salter 

Town Collector Myron H. Muise 

Town Counsel. .. .Fredric S. O'Brien, Esq. 

Town Engineer John Avery 

Town Manager J. Maynard Austin 

Town Physician 

Town Treasurer Anna M. Greeley 

Tree Dept . Supt Philip A. Busby 

Town Constables Benjamin C. Brown 

Thomas P. Eldred 
Veterans' Service Agent ... .Elmer S. Ober 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



Senator Edward W . Brooke 
535 Beacon Street, Newton 



Senator Edward M. Kennedy 
1702 P.O.Bldg., Boston 



FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DIST RICT 

F. Bradford Morse, 466 Beacon Street, Lowell 

FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 

Thomas J. Lane, 92 Abbott Street, Lawrence 

FIFTH ESS EX SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

William X. Wall, 179 Spruce Street, Lawrence 

THIRTEENTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DI ST RICT 

James P. Hurrell, 82 Saunders Street, North Andover 

FOURTEENTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 

Gerard A. Guilmette, 15 Foxcroft Ave., Lawrence 
Edward J. Grimley, Jr., 11 Kress Street, Lawrence 

SEVENTEENTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DIST RICT 

William G. Arvanitis, 510 Lowell Street, Lawrence 



131 



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TOWN PRINTING COMPANY, ANDOVER. MASS. 



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Annual Report 

of the 

Town of Andover 

for the 

19 7 1 

Fiscal Year 



prepared by the 
Town Manager 



Pursuant to the Provisions of 
Chapter 40, Section 49 
of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and Article II, Section 4 
of the By-Laws of the 
Town of Andover. 







TOWN OF ANDOVER 



MASSACHUSETTS 
01810 



February 4, 1972 



4 



U' 



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Town Hall 
20 Main Street 



TO THE CITIZENS OF ANDOVER: 

Our 325th anniversary year has come and gone into history. We shall long 
remember the celebration activities in May 1971 - the gala Anniversary 
Banquet, the stirring patriotic parade, and the historical pageants in 
which many of our "old-timers" re-enacted some of the important events of 
1646 and the early years of the founding of our Town c I am sure we are 
all grateful for the heritage that is ours, and accept the responsibility 
of passing along that heritage to present and future generations » 

The year we have just entered will have its problems - of that we can be 
sure. Some of them are already facing us: an adequate supply of clean 
water; a solution to the solid waste disposal problem; and the necessity 
of relief for the real estate taxpayer,, Serious discussions have been 
underway for some time regarding all of these problems, and while we may 
have sincere differences of opinion regarding the possible solutions, I 
am confident that in 1972 they will be resolved in an equitable manner,, 

Many important items are contained in the articles of the Town Meeting 
warrant for 1972, and the first meeting is scheduled for March 20th . We 
urge a capacity attendance so that after appropriate debate the decisions 
arrived at may be well-balanced and representative of the wishes of the 
entire community. 

In the final analysis, the greatest asset any Town has, is its people f 
and because of that I am completely confident regarding the future of 
Andover. This is especially true if we again pledge ourselves that by 
working together we will make Andover: 

"One community, under God, dedicated to freedom and justice for all." 



BOARD 




CTMEN 




Rob)ert A. Watters, Chairman 



raw;s 



Board of Selectmen 



The Board of Selectmen had 24 regular meetings and 16 special meetings during 
1971. They also held numerous conferences with Town Boards, committees and offi- 
cials; attended State and regional meetings and made numerous inspection trips to 
various sections of the community in response to complaints. 

In March, 1971, Robert A. Watters was re-elected Chairman, Roger W. Collins 
was re-elected Vice-Chairman and George E. Heseltine was elected to serve as 
Secretary. Sidney P. White continued as a member and Milton Greenberg began a 
three year term as the newly elected member of the Board. 

Following is a list of some of the major decisions and actions taken by the 
Board of Selectmen during 1971: 

AMBULANCE 

Accepted an excellent report prepared by a seven man Ambulance Study Committee, 
chairmaned by Dean Webster, and directed the Town Manager to implement the 
committee's recommendations. 

APPOINTMENTS 

Approved the appointments to various positions, boards and committees including the 
members of the new Historical Commission, the Community School Study Commission and 
the new Police Legal Adviser. 

CHIEFS' PAY BILL 

Notified Governor Sargent that the legislation dictating to the cities and towns 
the salaries of the Police and Fire Chiefs was, in the Selectmen's opinion, com- 
pletely contrary to the concept of Home Rule. 

DROP- IN CENTER 

Voted to establish a Teenage Drop-In Center at 2*5 Central Street and approved an 

eighteen month lease of the property. 

EMERGENCY EMPLOYMENT ACT 

Approved a Memorandum of Agreement between the Northern Essex County Emergency 
Employment Act Consortium and the Town of Andover providing for the employment of 
unemployed under this Federally funded program. Approved eleven positions includ- 
ing a Management Aide, Town Planner, Federal-State Program Coordinator and a 
Community Organizer. 

HOUSING 

Endorsed a statement of objectives set forth in the Central Merrimack Regional 

Planning District Commission's report entitled "Initial Housing Element". 

HUNTING 

Voted to allow hunting on town-owned land on the northerly side of Haggetts Pond. 

JUNK CARS 

Supported the Building Inspector's annual canvass of the community to enforce com- 
pliance with the bylaws governing junk cars on private property. 

LAND ACQUISITIONS 

Voted to take by eminent domain proceedings for school purposes parcels of land to 

expand the town property at the South School on Woburn Street. 

Approved a 5-year $360,000 School Acquisition Bond Issue. 

LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Increased the fees for all liquor licenses, Common Victualer, taxi, and petitions 

and certificates of registration for inflammable fluids. 



LICENSES AND PERMITS - Cont . 

Granted Lodging House Licenses to Bryant -Mcintosh Junior College, Phillips Academy 

and Abbot Academy to use certain properties as dormitories. 

Granted renewals of all kinds of licenses, numerous pole locations and street open- 
ing permits . 

Granted a gravel removal permit to DeLoury Construction Company from parcels of 
land on Fosters Pond Road. 

Granted the renewal of three gravel removal permits. 

NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE 

Approved a resolution requesting the Federal Insurance Administration to approve 
the eligibility of Andover for participation in the National Flood Insurance Pro- 
gram. 

PURCHASING 

Approved the proposal that a Town Central Purchasing Review Committee be estab- 
lished. 

SOLID WASTE 

Accepted the report of the Solid Waste Disposal Committee, chairmaned by Joseph W. 

Odium. 

Directed the Town Manager and the Director of Public Works to contact officials in 
North Reading, Tewksbury and Wilmington to ascertain their interest in a regional 
solution to the solid waste problem while continuing to work with the officials in 
Lawrence, Methuen and North Andover on a regional solution. 

WATER RATES 

Established a new schedule of water rates including minimum charges and charges for 
private fire protection effective with all billing on or after August 1, 1971. The 
new rates were a revision downward from those recommended by the Town's Water Con- 
sultant . 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

Authorized the Town Manager to execute an agreement with HUD for a $1,500,000 

Federal Grant for the construction of a Water Treatment Plant. 

Authorized the Town Manager to execute a $4,655,151. contract with Morris & Sons 
Construction Company for the construction of the Water Treatment Plant. 

Approved a 15-year $2.9 million Water Treatment Plant bond issue. 

WEST ANDOVER SEWER 

Authorized a preliminary survey and design of the West Andover Sanitary Sewer 
beginning at Wolcott Avenue and Sanborn Street in Lawrence and extending along the 
Merrimack River to and under 1-93 . 

Approved the construction of a section of a 36" West Andover Sanitary Sewer across 
the 1-93 right-of-way and in the embankment of the 1-93 Merrimack River bridge by 
the State's contractor for widening this bridge. 



Town Manager 



It is with pleasure that this, the 1971 Annual Town Report covering your Town 
Manager's second full year in office, is prepared and submitted to the citizens of 
the Town of Andover . Subjects of major concern during this anniversary year in- 
cluded ecology, collective bargaining, emergency employment, treatment of the 
Merrimack River water and recreation. Matters of this nature were of no concern 
to the settlers of Andover but, in today's world, require attention and substantial 
funding. Attention given to these matters by your town government is summarized 
below together with comments on other factors affecting town administration in 1971 

ECOLOGY 

National awakening to the matters of ecology has been reflected in Andover. The 
State Department of Public Health's regulation banning outdoor burning became effec- 
tive in July. While this meant inconvenience to many and an increase in volume of 
waste materials at the landfill, it was a tremendous boost to fire protection. 
Outdoor burning, including trash barrels, has always been troublesome as a cause of 
fires. Public response to this restriction has been commendable. 

The moving of the landfill operation closer to a sanitary landfill operation fell 
short of our goal during the year. The amount of cover material was doubled. 
While the area of exposed trash was reduced, measurably improving the appearance, 
the cover material available was insufficient to provide for daily cover. Contract 
chipping of wood waste proved unsatisfactory as the capacity of the equipment was 
insufficient in comparison with the annual accumulation of wood and the cost per 
hour was excessive for the results achieved. 

The consulting firm of Metcalf & Eddy was employed to study two possible areas in 
the Lowell Junction area for a new disposal site. Topographical and subsurface 
examinations were conducted in the Fall and a preliminary report submitted early in 
1972. A final report together with recommendations will be available by early 
Spring. Consideration of the report, negotiations with the landowners, hearings by 
the Andover Board of Public Health and the State Department of Public Health and 
Town Meeting consideration will follow. 

Eventual elimination of the discharge of Andover 's raw sewage into the Merrimack 
River along with similar discharges from the City of Lawrence and the Towns of 
Methuen and North Andover moved closer to reality. The Greater Lawrence Sanitary 
District Commission expects completion of the construction plans in March, with 
construction to be underway in 1972. Although the anticipated cost of the com- 
pleted Phase I, i.e. treatment plant and principal interceptor sewers, is consider- 
ably greater than anticipated when the agreement was reached to form the district, 
the regional approach is still the most economic approach to this problem. 

Andover 's share of the estimated construction cost of $67,000,000 is approximately 
$1,120,000. Operating costs will be based on the volume of waste treated. It will 
be 1973 or, perhaps, 1974 before the annual District assessment against the Town of 
Andover reflects the construction cost of the treatment plant. 

Elimination of air and stream pollution and the closing of open dumps and the elim- 
ination of related burning, ground water pollution and rat populations are all 
laudable programs and long overdue. We are, however, beginning to feel the effects 
of the cost of these commendable programs. The operating budget for the solid 
waste disposal site rose substantially in 1971 and the 1972 budget is up 160% over 
1971. An additional appropriation will be required before the end of 1972 to pur- 
chase or lease a new site, for final grading of the present site and preparation of 
the new site prior to its use. Unfortunately, municipalities will never be able to 
return to the inexpensive method of handling the solid wastes. 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

Construction of the water treatment plant was started in May of 1971. This plant, 

now a project in excess of five million dollars, was conceived in 1959 as a final 

phase of a program to provide Andover with a new and adequate water supply. In an 



earlier phase of construction, a pumping station was constructed on the Merrimack 
River. This station was designed to pump water collected from Fish Brook into 
Haggetts Pond via a 24" water main. With the completion of the treatment plant, 
scheduled for December 1972, the Fish Brook pumping station can take Merrimack River 
water, chlorinate it and discharge it into Haggetts Pond. With the completion of 
the treatment plant, the old pumping station will be demolished, the three wells now 
supplementing the Haggetts Pond supply will be closed down. The new plant is de- 
signed to supply all of the town's water supply needs to 1990. 

The Federal Grant of $1,500,000. was certainly a major contribution towards the 
financing of this project. The Selectmen, Director of Public Works and the Town 
Manager are most grateful for the assistance rendered by Senators Brooke and Kennedy 
and Representative Bradford Morse in obtaining this substantial assistance. 

POLICE 

In line with a program of strengthening the supervision in the Police Department and 
establishing a plain clothes unit, an extra Lieutenant and an extra Sergeant were 
appointed. The appointment of another Lieutenant, making three for the department, 
is awaiting the establishment of a new Civil Service list. Plain clothes unit now 
consists of a Sergeant and two Patrolmen. A third Patrolman will be added to the 
unit at an appropriate time in the future. 

Working jointly with the Town of North Andover, a $15,000. Federal Grant was secured 
under the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act Program for providing a full 
time Attorney to serve as a Legal Advisor to the two Police Departments. John 
Boyle, appointed in November, is on call 24 hours a day for consultation with on 
duty Police Officers, aids the prosecuting officers in preparing their cases for 
court and carries on training programs for the officers of the two departments. 

TAXES 

Industrial growth of the late sixties enabled the Assessors to hold the 1971 tax 
rate at $46.00 per thousand, the same as 1970, even though there was an 11.7 per- 
cent increase in appropriations. Unfortunately, there will not be a similar growth 
in the valuation in 1972. The Nation's economic condition is a contributing factor 
in the lack of further growth in Andover. In addition, plans for the West Andover 
Sanitary Sewer must be completed before the financial institution, now holding sub- 
stantial land in West Andover Industrial Area, can merchandize its property. 

CIVIL SERVICE 

Civil Service has become a serious deterrent to efficient operation of the town de- 
partments. The time lag in filling of requisitions for new employees in some in- 
stances is now approaching two years. Police Sergeants appointed in 1971 were 
appointed twelve months following the filing of the requisition. It is anticipated 
that the appointment of a second new Lieutenant in the Police Department will be 
nineteen months following the filing of the requisition and thirty months for the 
Assistant Civil Engineer. 

Members of the Police, Fire and Department of Public Works and Plumbing Inspector 
are under State Civil Service Regulations. As the result of a 1971 Town Meeting 
vote, the employees at the Spring Grove Cemetery were placed under Civil Service. 

EMERGENCY EMPLOYMENT ACT 

Unemployment in excess of 6% in the Nation caused Congress in July to pass the 
Emergency Employment Act of 1971, Public Law 92-54. It allocated three quarters of 
a billion dollars for the fiscal year 1971-1972 with an anticipated appropriation 
of one billion dollars for the fiscal year 1972-1973 to provide for immediate 
employment of the unemployed by local public agencies. The program is administered 
by the Secretary of Labor and funds distributed among the States in accordance with 
a formula established within the law and by the Secretary of Labor. 

Secretary of Manpower Affairs Mary B. Newman is responsible for the administration 
of the program in Massachusetts and for establishing a system for distributing the 
funds within the Commonwealth. The cities and towns were grouped on a regional 
basis into consortiums. Andover was included in the Northern Essex Emergency Em- 
ployment Act Consortium which is made up of sixteen cities and towns and to which 



over $900,000. was allocated. Some 256 individuals have been employed within the 
Consortium under this program. 

The Selectmen in November 1971 approved a Memorandum of Agreement with the Consor- 
tium relative to the administration of the program. Andover's share of the Con- 
sortium's allocation was $62,085. under Section 5 of the Act and approximately 
$10,000. under Section 6. The Selectmen approved the establishment of eleven posi- 
tions under the program. 

Between the announcement of the allocation of funds to the Consortium in September 
and December 1st, ten positions were filled. The eleventh, the Community Organizer, 
made possible under Section 6 of the Act, was appointed in January. Two positions 
were assigned by the Selectmen to the School Department who selected individuals to 
help publish curriculum material and to develop supplemental educational programs. 
Two laborers were assigned to the Department of Public Works with special assignment 
to the maintenance of the town's four skating rinks. One clerk was assigned to the 
Highway Division with later duties to include assisting in the Town Accountant's 
office. 

The purpose of the Act is to put unemployed to productive work at the municipal 
level. Consequently, careful consideration was given to the selection of the posi- 
tions to be filled under the program. In doing this, the uniqueness of this 
economic crisis, i.e. the unemployment among engineers and administrators from the 
space and defense industries, was kept in mind along with the needs of the town's 
administration. The Town Manager believed that the greatest administrative 
deficiency included the need for an Administrative Assistant to the Manager and a 
professional planner. The Selectmen concurred with the approval of the positions of 
Management Aide and Town Planner. In view of the number of State and Federal 
Assistance Programs now available to municipalities, a Federal/State Program Coor- 
dinator was appointed to become familiar with available programs and aid various 
town departments in filing for grants. 

RECREATION 

Concerned over the lack of an adequate recreation program for all ages in Andover, 
the Manager secured the approval of the Selectmen for the appointment of a Citizens' 
Study Committee. The committee was charged in November to evaluate the current 
reereation programs, consider whether more extensive programs were desired and, if 
so, who should provide them. Alternatives include the revitalization of the Recrea- 
tion Department, the shifting of this responsibility to the school system, a com- 
bination of the two or the greater utilization of private agencies. They were 
asked to give particular attention to the greater use of the public school facili- 
ties which contain some eight gymnasiums and have a total value in excess of 
$22,000,000. The committee, chairmaned by Richard Barney, is functioning under the 
name of Community School Study Committee. Meeting weekly in December and January, 
a preliminary report and recommendations is expected prior to Town Meeting. 

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING 

With the passage by the General Court in 1965 of "An Act providing for the election 
of representative bargaining agents with political subdivisions of the Common- 
wealth", Massachusetts' municipalities entered a new era in labor management rela- 
tions. Few municipal officials had at that time any experience in collective bar- 
gaining. In fact, there were very few individuals in the State with experience in 
bargaining in the municipal field. Some officials felt obliged to handle bargain- 
ing themselves even though the employees had professionals on their side of the 
table. Others felt confident and proceeded to learn by experience. Others employed 
Town Counsels, lawyers and negotiators experienced in the private sector of labor 
negotiations. Today, most administrators recognize that collective bargaining is 
a specialized field requiring experience in bargaining, knowledge of the collective 
bargaining law and related State statutes. The Town Manager chose on his arrival 
in Andover to employ an attorney, James Grady, with collective bargaining experi- 
ence in both the municipal and private sectors. The Town's bargaining team for 
each contract during the past two years has consisted of Mr. Grady, the Town Manager 
and, generally, the head of the department whose contract is being negotiated. 



With the state of the art having advanced since Andover's first contracts were 
negotiated, the major thrust of the negotiations in 1969-1970 was to strengthen 
the management's position in contracts with the Firefighters and the D.P.W. 
employees. Some 25 negotiation sessions were required to reach new agreements 
with these two unions. 

Prior to 1971, the Police Officers had never formally organized. The Andover 
Police Betterment Association was formed in the Spring of 1970 and the State Labor 
Relations Commission found this Association to adequately represent the officers 
in collective bargaining in August, 1970. Negotiations for the first contract 
were difficult and protracted. The Association chose at the end of the second 
bargaining session in November, 1970, to appeal to the State for a conciliator. 
A conciliator was assigned and sat in on bargaining sessions from January to April 
of 1971. The Association then requested the State to certify a fact finder. The 
fact finder held only one hearing in June as she became incapacitated by reason of 
an accident. Finally, on July 30th, negotiations took a favorable turn and with- 
out a State conciliator an agreement was reached between the Town Manager and the 
bargaining team of the Association in August for a three year contract. However, 
President Nixon's Wage Price Freeze was imposed on Sunday before ratification by 
the Association of the agreement on Monday. Consequently, the agreed-to wages 
could not be paid during the freeze period. The freeze regulations did, however, 
allow retroactive pay beginning April 1 to the beginning of the freeze. The new 
wage rates were reapplied with the beginning of Phase II in November. 

As the contracts with the members of the Fire Department and the Department of 
Public Works were two year contracts, expiring on March 31, 1972, no negotiations 
were necessary in the winter of 1970-71. Negotiations for renewal of these con- 
tracts began in October 1971. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager immensely regrets the necessity of from time to time having to 
give excuses for the lack of progress in executing projects by reason of lack of 
time. Warnings by the former Town Manager and the present Town Manager that the 
workload had increased to the point where relief was necessary were ignored until 
the Emergency Employment Act funds became available last August. The Town 
Manager's pleadings to replace Water and Sewer Superintendent Donald C. Bassett 
were disregarded at the time the Departments of Highway, Forestry, Cemetery, Land- 
fill, Vehicle Maintenance, Water and Sewer were combined into the Department of 
Public Works and a Director employed. The efforts of the Director and the Manager, 
regardless of the hours spent, have not been sufficient to carry on the tremendous 
volume of administrative details concerning the day-to-day operations and have 
time left to give adequate attention to significant problems of the town and to 
move the approved projects along at a desirable rate. 

The Town Manager is hopeful that this problem has been eased with the appointment 
of the Management Aide made under the Emergency Employment Act and some reorganiza- 
tion within the Department of Public Works as a new treatment plant is staffed. 

PERSONNEL 

Death took the lives of two active members of town government during the year. 
The untimely death of Civil Defense Director Burton Batcheller saddened all those 
who knew him and the town lost an active advocate of preparedness for natural 
disasters . 

John Thomson, the faithful custodian of the Town Hall for five years, passed on 
in May. All members of the Town Hall staff miss this friendly and accommodating 
man with his bountiful energy. 

RETIREMENTS 

Retirements during 1971 included the following: 

Duncan M. Cairnie Catherine C. Doherty Martha MacMillan 
Edna M. Dolan Edward J. O'Hagan Philip E. Rollins 
Adella Williams George C. Williams 



Town Clerk 



The total number of registered voters in Andover as of July 1, 1971 was 11,439, 
by precincts as follows: 

1 — 2,178 4 — 2,717 

2 ~ 1,117 5 — 994 

3 — 1,878 6 — 2,555 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Number of births recorded 284 

Males 133 
Females 151 

Number of marriages recorded 228 

Number of deaths recorded 203 

Males 88 
Females 115 

2,100 dogs were licensed and $6,810.00 collected. Of this amount, $593.65 
was turned over to the Town Treasurer for fees. 

959 Hunting and Fishing Licenses were issued and $4,875.90 collected. Of 
this amount, $226.40 was turned over to the Town Treasurer for fees. 

Other fees collected were as follows: 

Marriage Intentions $522.00 

Certified copies of 806.50 

Vital Statistics 

Uniform Commercial Codes 1,662.00 

Alcoholic Beverage 8,130.00 

Licenses 

Business Certificates 42.50 

Miscellaneous 2,494.87 

Total fees collected — $ 14,477.92 

The Board of Registrars held eleven sessions during the year for the purpose 
of registering new voters, checking signatures on nomination papers, private war- 
rant articles and one petition. The 1971 voting list was also checked. 



Town Counsel 



At the beginning of 1971, fifty-one cases were pending as follows 

Appellate Tax Board 27 

Zoning 2 

Public Liability 2 

Eminent Domain 11 

Contract 5 

Other 4 



10 



During the course of the year, twenty-seven new cases arose as follows: 

Appellate Tax Board 12 

Zoning 2 

Public Liability 1 

Eminent Domain 6 

Contract 5 

Other 1 

In 1971, twenty-one cases were terminated. 

During the year, there were thirty-nine appearances before courts and adminis- 
trative boards. 

Written legal opinions were rendered on fifty-five subjects. 

Fifty-two parcels of land were taken by eminent domain. 

During the year, contracts were drawn and reviewed, and deeds and releases were 
drafted. 

Oral opinions were given almost daily. 



Town Treasurer 



General Balance January 1, 1971 $ 3,534,795.06 

Receipts including loans and proceeds from bond issue 25,309 , 854 . 35 



Transfer to special checking account proceeds from Water 
Treatment Plant and Town Hall bond issues $ 3,507,046.03 



$28,844,649.41 



Disbursements including tax anticipation loans 22,408,303 .67 25, 915,349.70 

Balance December 31, 1971 $ 2,929,299.71 

Interest on investment surplus funds $ 86,765.96 

Interest on Water Treatment Plant funds $ 14,748.96 

Bond Issue for Water Treatment Plant $ 2,950,000.00 

Bond Issue for School Land Acquisition $ 360,000.00 

Loans in anticipation of revenue $ 4,000,000.00 

Seven Tax Titles redeemed. 

Applications for Affidavits to foreclose twenty-one tax titles of land of 
low value were prepared for filing with Commissioner of Taxation. 

A sale of bonds was held July 13, 1971 for the Water Treatment Plant and 
School Land Acquisition. These were sold to Chemical Bank, Continental Illinois 
National Bank and Trust Company of Chicago, Blyth and Company, Inc., and Dean, 
Witter and Company with an interest rate of 5.00, the last principal payment on 
the Water Treatment Plant Bonds being due July 15, 1986 (Principal $2,950,000.00, 
Interest $1,173,750.00); the last principal payment on the School Land 
Acquisition Bonds being due July 15, 1976 (Principal $360,000.00, Interest 
$53,250.00). 

11 



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12 



Assessors 



The 1971 real estate assessed value of $201,080,700 indicates an increase of 
$12,581,200 over the previous year and a total increase of $92,197,100 since 1966. 
Included in this figure is the result of the equalization program conducted in 1967 
which resulted in an increase of $49,374,000. 

The total assessed value of all taxable personal property in 1971 was 
$8,326,400, an increase of $497,300 over the previous year and an increase of 
$3,003,500 during the past five year period. 

COMPARATIVE ASSESSING DATA 



SUMMARY REPORT 



1966 



1971 



Number of Accounts Assessed 
Valuation - Personal Property 
Valuation - Real Estate 
Total Valuation 
Tax Rate Per $1,000 Valuation 
Number of Dwellings Assessed 



7,538 
$ 5,322,900 
$ 108,883,600 
$ 114,206,500 
$ 33.00 

5,116 



Clause 41 (Elderly) 
Clause 22 (Veterans) 
Clause 37 (Blind) 



TAX EXEMPTIONS GRANTED 



16,821.09 

18,044.40 

693.00 



$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


8,871 

8,326,400 

201,080,700 

208,843,500 

46.00 

5,894 


$ 
$ 
$ 


49,472.80 

32,418.20 

3,850.00 



REAL ESTATE EXEMPTIONS 



Property of United States 

Property of Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Property of Literary Organizations 

Property of Charitable Organizations 

Property of Benevolent Organizations 

Houses of Religious Worship 

Parsonages 

Cemeteries 

Andover Housing Authority 

Property Put to a Public Use 

Property of a District 

Number of Acres Exempt 

Number of Accounts Exempt 



$ 211,450.00 
$ 339,300.00 
$25,267,725.00 
$ 73,725.00 
$ 244,375.00 
$ 1,902,225.00 
$ 195,000.00 
$ 218,275.00 
$ 906,250.00 
$ 7,632,100.00 
$ - 

2,962.74 
792 



$ 1,881,700.00 
$ 532,700.00 
$27,864,900.00 
$ 72,100.00 
$ 505,300.00 
$ 2,592,800.00 
$ 259,900.00 
$ 300,400.00 
$ 1,516,700.00 
$15,940,300.00 
$ 2,307,900.00 
3,629.07 
736 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE 



Number of Vehicles Assessed 

Assessed Valuation 

Excise 

Abatements 

Tax Rate Per $1,000 Valuation 

1971 Assessed Value ■ 
1970 Assessed Value - 



1971 Assessed Value 
1970 Assessed Value 



Real Estate 
Real Estate 

Increase 



10,737 
$ 8,643,085.00 
$ 549,775.47 
$ 51,980.90 
$ 66.00 

$200,517,100.00 
188,499,500.00 

$ 12,017,600.00 



Personal Property $ 8,326,400.00 
Personal Property 7,829,100.00 



15,184 
$12,553,911.00 
$ 783,881.37 
$ 84,827.33 
$ 66.00 



Increase 



$ 



497,300.00 



13 



RECAPITULATION 
Computations for Determining 1971 Tax Rate and Comparison with 1970 

APPROPRIATIONS 

1971 1970 

$ 12 485,422.80 $ 11,186,458.91 Appropriations approved at Annual Town Meeting 

' 93^555100 56,500.00 Voted from available funds at Annual Town Meeting 
126,000.00 145,848.47 Voted from available funds at Special Town 
Meetings previous year 

$ 12,704,977.80 $ 11,388 807.38 TOTAL AMOUNT APPROPRIATED 

STATE AND COUNTY TAX ASSESSMENTS 

$ 269,419.47 $ 248,758.68 County Tax 

45,540.02 33,795.41 State Recreation Areas 

4,453.59 6,532.31 State Audit of Municipal Accounts 

1,372.94 164.45 State Examination of Retirement System 

1,324.17 1,624.00 Health Insurance - State Elderly Governmental 

Retiree Program 

2,477.40 2,166.30 Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 

2,414.10 2,259.71 Ipswich River Watershed District 

3,545.75 Underestimates - County Tax 

2,711.66 657.76 Overestimates - State Recreation 

266,342.43 243,823.58 OVERLAY 



$ 596,055.78 $ 543,327.95 GROSS AMOUNT NEEDED FROM ALL AVAILABLE SOURCES 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$ 1,453,927.74 $ 1,585,884.39 Estimated Receipts Certified by Commissioner 

658,000.00 527,000.00 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

15,000.00 14,000.00 Licenses 

2,000.00 2,000.00 Fines 

45,000.00 30,000.00 Special Assessments 

2,500.00 6,000.00 General Government 

20,000.00 40,000.00 Protection of Persons and Property 

2,000.00 2,500.00 Health and Sanitation 

600 00 4,000.00 Highways 

24,000.00 17,000.00 School (Local Receipts of School Committee) 

500.00 2,000.00 Libraries (Local Receipts Other Than State Aid) 

400,000.00 220,000.00 Public Service Enterprises (Such as Water Dept . ) 

6,500.00 6,000.00 Cemeteries (Other Than Trust Funds & Sale of Lots) 

70,000.00 50,000.00 Interest 

500.00 500.00 Farm Animal, Machinery and Equipment Excise 
1,500.00 1,500.00 Andover Housing Authority 

$ 2,702,027.74 $ 2,508,384.39 TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

OVERESTIMATES PREVIOUS YEAR 

$ 3,823.36 $ — County Tax 

AMOUNTS VOTED TO BE TAKEN FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$ 103,555.00 $ 101,500.00 Voted Regular Town Meeting 

126,000.00 145,848.77 Voted Special Town Meeting Previous Year 

800,000.00 380,000.00 Voted Regular Town Meeting to Reduce Tax Rate 

$ 1,029,555.00 $ 627,348.77 TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 



14 



1971 



NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION ON PROPERTY 
1970 



$ 9,632,726.60 $ 9,031,115.60 



VALUATION 



$ 8,326,400.00 $ 7,829,100.00 Valuation of Personal Property 
201,080,700.00 188,499,500.00 Valuation of Real Estate 

$209,407,100.00 $196,328,600.00 TOTAL 

TAX RATE 

$ 



27.18 $ 
18.82 



26.34 School Rate 
19.66 General 



$ 



46.00 $ 



46.00 TOTAL TAX RATE 

TOTAL TAXES LEVIED 



$ 383,014.40 $ 360,138.60 Personal Property 
9,249,712.20 8,670.977.00 Real Estate 

$ 9,632,726.60 $ 9,031,115.60 TOTAL TAXES LEVIED ON PROPERTY 



$ 27,596.14 $ 
2,441.70 
14,705.46 



20,070.57 Sewer Betterments Added to Taxes 
1,948.29 Water Betterments Added to Taxes 
15,217.64 Water Liens Added to Taxes 



$ 



44,743.30 $ 



37,236.50 TOTAL ADDED TO TAXES 
VALUATION BREAKDOWN BY CLASS 
1970 



1971 







Total 


Percent of 




Total 


Pe 


rcent of 




Number 


Valuation 




Total 


Number 


Valuation 




Total 


Commercial 


181 


$ 22,349,300 




12 


179 


$ 23,069,300 




11 


Industrial 


63 


22,584,000 




12 


66 


29,612,100 




15 


Residential 


7,816 


143,566,200 




76 


7,890 


148,399,300 




74 


Total 


8,060 


$188,499,500 




100 


8,135 


$201,080,700 




100 






TEN TOP 


TAXPAYERS 


- 1971 









Endrock Associates & Raytheon Co. 
Gillette Company 
Massachusetts Electric Co. 
Phillips Academy 
Sebago-Andover Realty Trust 

(Br ockway -Smith) 
Frene, John S. (Andover Terrace) 
Melrand Trust ( Washington Park) 
Lawrence Gas Company 
Colonial Drive Realty Trust 
Rolling Green Motor Inn Corp. 



PERSONAL PROPERTY 
ASSESSED TAX 



$3,742,100 $172,136.60 
38,400 1,766.40 



REAL ESTATE 



ASSESSED 



TAX 



$15,438,100 $710,152.60 
7,019,900 322,915.40 



9,500 

20,000 

40,000 

1,499,700 

45,000 

3,500 



437.00 
920.00 

1,840.00 
68,986.20 

2,070.00 
161.00 



82,600 
2,745,500 

2,040,000 
1,796,800 
1,776,400 

1,420,400 
1,366,900 



3,799.60 
126,293.00 

93,840.00 
82,652.80 
81,714.40 

65,388.40 
62,877.40 



15 



Municipal Buildings 



EAST JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

A $94,441 contract was let in July to 0. E. Steinert Company, Inc., on plans 
and specifications prepared by A. D. Maclaren for further renovations of the East 
Junior High School,, This contract included the complete refurbishing of the kitchen 
of the Home Economics Department, separating the kitchen from the cafeteria with a 
permanent partition and dividing the cafeteria in half by a folding partition, in- 
stallation of stair treads for each stairway, partitioning a large classroom into a 
small and medium sized classroom, refurbishing the rooms of the Art Department, and 
the installation of science tables in a former classroom to create a second science 
room. 

These renovations were accomplished under the bond issue approved at the 1968 
Annual Town Meeting. 

PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER 

A storage area in the basement of the Police portion of the Public Safety Cen- 
ter was converted into a locker room in the fall. The former locker room off the 
squad room in the basement was then converted into an office for the three plain 
clothesmen . 

Final Financial Report 

Total Appropriated $863,000.00 

Land Acquisition and Site 

Clearance $196,351.09 

Architect - Rejected Plans 38,556.00 
Architect - Accepted Plans 

(Includes Clerk of 

Works) 49,719.69 

General Contract 504,142.00 

Equipment 68,746.25 

Landscaping and Other Costs 5,484.14 862,999.17 



Unexpended $ .83 



TOWN HALL 



Three of the offices formerly used by the Police Department on the first floor 
of the Town Hall have been assigned to the Management Aide, Town Planner, Federal/ 
State Program Coordinator, and a secretary serving these three. All four of these 
employees were hired under the Emergency Employment Act Program. 

The rear hall on the first floor, the rear stairway, the Treasurer's private 
office, and three of the former Police Department's offices assigned to the E.E„A. 
Program personnel were redecorated in the fall by an E.E.A custodian. 

WEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ADDITION 

This addition was accepted as substantially completed and occupied with the 
opening of school in September, 1970. A relatively small punch list (a list of un- 
completed items) remained after acceptance. The largest items on this list in- 
cluded the repointing of sections of the exterior brick wall and the air -conditioning 
system. The contractor and his subcontractors did little on the punch list during 
1971. Negotiations with the contractor over payments due him broke down in Decem- 
ber, 1970. The contractor chose to take the matter to arbitration in June. Hear- 
ings before a three-man board of arbitrators of the American Arbitration Associa- 
tion began in October. Five such hearings were held during the fall and winter. 
The decision of the arbitrator is expected in the spring. 

16 



Council on Aging 



The Council on Aging has continued to center its work mainly on The Andover 
Haven, the drop-in center for senior citizens, and related activities. The Haven 
continues to be open Monday through Friday, ten a.m. to four p.m. and is staffed by 
volunteers from the over-sixty population under the direction of Mrs Natalie 
Stokham. 

The Drop-In Center also serves as an information and referral center with an 
up-to-date file on the services and opportunities available to older residents of 
Andover. During the past year part-time employment has been located for several re- 
tired men, and the babysitting list has proved useful to both those older women 
listed as sitters and those calling to avail themselves of the service. 

The Hot Lunch Program formerly available at the East Junior High School has 
been changed to the Doherty School this year, and the hour has been changed to 
twelve-fifteen. This program has not received a great deal of support from local 
residents, and it is hoped that more of those who are over sixty will participate. 
It is necessary to call The Haven for reservations in advance. When this program 
was first instituted, it was erroneously thought to be for the "needy." This is 
not the case. It is for everyone who is over sixty who is a resident of Andover. 

Once each month, on the first Tuesday, free transportation is provided by the 
Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School to a luncheon served at 
one o'clock for the nominal fee of fifty cents. These luncheons continue to be well 
attended. 

Classes in oil painting, crewel embroidery, Christmas Decorations, and sewing 
have been held on a regular basis at the Drop-In Center this past year. The crewel 
classes have been well received and it has been necessary to form a second group. 
The bowling group still meets once each week and welcomes new members. Several in 
the group are in their eighties and still manage to bowl three or four strings be- 
fore going out to lunch and then on to a Scrabble game at The Haven. 

Friday afternoons the Drop-In Center is closed to women and is given over ex- 
clusively to the men. There is usually a game of Forty-fives going on and some 
comfortable chatting. 

Because of the limited space at the present location, the Council has asked 
for additional funds this year in order to move to larger quarters. The present 
space is barely adequate for a few people sitting around. If the television set is 
going, a Scrabble game underway, and a class meeting, the space becomes most inade- 
quate. Sympathies must be extended to the men who wanted to watch the World Series 
on the colored television set. They could not hear above the chatting and instruc- 
tion going on and were finally forced to go elsewhere. With larger quarters it 
would be possible to have a separate area for the television set. 

It is hoped that more space will provide an area for such services as Social 
Security, Financial Assistance , Food Distribution, and other services of that nature. 
It is not possible to answer questions privately in the present space, so many indi- 
viduals just will not come in to ask things of a personal nature. The Surplus Food 
Distribution Program is a good illustration of this. There are many more in town 
who are eligible to receive surplus food under this program than came in to apply. 
Perhaps this is because the questions asked by the representative from Lawrence had 
to be answered under the scrutiny of all those seated in the room at the time. It 
is desirable to have a separate office area for things of this type. 

The Andover Haven group usually plans one outside trip per month . The best 
trip during the past year, according to all reports, was to White River Junction, 
Vermont. Other trips have included trips to Rockport, Hampton Beach, and several 
shopping trips to the Northshore Shopping Center. 

On the third Thursday of each month Memorial Hall Library provides a program 

17 



of films for The Haven group. The Andover Baptist Church provides the meeting 
place, and the program has proved to be quite popular with the senior residents. A 
short business meeting is held after the film program and refreshments are served. 
Thanks are tendered to both the Baptist Church and the Library for making this pro- 
gram possible. 

Memorial Hall Library also offered an evening musicale for Andover 's senior 
citizens during the Christmas season. About seventy-five attended; and after a 
program of music and carol singing, refreshments were served. The Library is also 
initiating an "adopted grandparent" program with the senior citizens and local 
children . 

The Andover Service Club has again replaced the station wagon with a 1972 model 
which continues to provide transportation for shopping to senior residents. The 
drivers are all volunteers and give willingly of their time. 

During the Christmas Season this year the local groups of Knights of Columbus, 
Masons, and the Andover Service Club provided free bus transportation to Briarcliff 
where The Haven members and a group of North Andover senior citizens enjoyed a tur- 
key dinner, entertainment, a visit from Santa Claus , dancing, gifts, all of which 
added up to an afternoon they will long remember. This was certainly the social 
highlight of the year for the group, and thanks are extended to all who contributed. 

A Newsletter is printed at the beginning of each month which lists the current 
activities and contains other items of interest. This has proved to be quite popu- 
lar, and many stop in at 15 Barnard around the first of the month to pick up a copy. 



Planning Board 



The Planning Board lost its newest member in the course of the year when Pro- 
fessor William Haskell, Jr., found that increased academic duties made it impossi- 
ble for him to continue to serve with us. At the close of the year, therefore, the 
Board was functioning with only four members. 

Near the end of the year the Federal Emergency Employment Act enabled the Town 
to offer the position of Planner to Mr. Joseph Schall , Jr. Mr. Schall, who started 
his employment in December^ is already hard at work on Planning Board study pro- 
jects . 

The subdivision control activities of the Board lessened somewhat during this 
year compared to the several preceding years, reflecting the general reduction of 
the business and manufacturing activity of the area. Only three definitive plans 
were submitted and approved. These plans aggregated a total of one hundred and 
thirty-three house lots. In addition, a total of forty-three "Form A" requests in- 
volving sixty-six house lots were certified by the Board as not being subject to 
subdivision procedures. 

As has been the custom in the past, representatives of the Board attended the 
twelve Board of Appeals hearings, voicing the viewpoint of the Planning Board with 
respect to each of the fifty-four petitions heard by the Board of Appeals. 

During the year the Planning Board had joint meetings with the Board of Select- 
men, the Conservation and Industrial Development Commissions, and the Andover 
Housing Authority. Its representatives regularly took part in the activities of the 
Merrimack Valley Planning Commission and those of the Massachusetts Federation of 
Planning Boards. In addition, special meetings have been held with the Andover 
Chamber of Commerce and with representatives of the State Department of Public 
Works and its consultants for traffic improvement studies and planning currently 
going on within the town under the auspices of the Commonwealth. 

Under the heading of zoning, the Board successfully sponsored two articles to 
tighten up safety requirements for swimming pools in the town. In addition, the 
Town Meeting approved an article providing for screening between industrial facili- 
ties and the Shawsheen and Merrimack Rivers. 

18 



Three developers proposed to the October Town Meeting that certain areas be 
rezoned to permit the construction of condominiums. The Board's professional con- 
sultants were requested to study the question of condominiums and their desirability 
or lack of it. The consultants felt that two of the three proposals which involved 
changes within the one acre zone would be inappropriate in that they constituted a 
radical change in the population density with respect to the surrounding areas. 
They saw no strong indications that condominiums were needed in Andover but suggested 
that if the people of Andover felt such a development was desirable, the condominium 
area proposed on North Main Street would be the only one they could recommend. The 
Planning Board concurred with these views. All three proposals, however, were re- 
jected by the Town Meeting. 

The Planning Board proposed, through special articles, that consultants with 
expertise in traffic and highway planning and construction be asked to study the 
Lawrence and Lowell Junction connector problems. These studies were approved by 
Town Meeting and are currently being carried out. 

Other studies under way at the end of the year either by the Planning Board and 
staff or by its consultants include Central Business District Parking, Housing, and 
an updating of the Capital Expenditures Program for the town. 



Board of Appeals 



The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals, operating under and governed by Massachu- 
setts General Laws, Chapter 40A, and the Town Zoning Bylaws, has three regular 
members and three associate members, the latter sitting in the absence of a regular 
member. The Board is appointed by the Selectmen and serves without pay. It has 
adopted rules and regulations regulating the filing of applications and the prose- 
cution of appeals to it, and sits at twelve regularly scheduled monthly hearings, 
on the first Thursday of every month. 



lows: 



During the 1971 year fifty-four petitions were heard and disposed of as fol- 

43 petitions granted 
11 petitions denied 

54 

A total of $1,040.00 for advertising fees was collected and turned over to the 
Town Treasurer and the Town Collector. 

The Board's activity includes not only hearings but also views taken by it, 
consultation amongst its members in arriving at decisions, correspondence, and the 
drafting of decisions. On rare occasions time is required to testify in court upon 
an appeal from one of the Board's decisions. The number of hours spent by the 
various members upon Board business totals between 250 and 300 hours a year. 

The Board would like to express its appreciation for the substantial assistance 
it receives from the Building Inspector and his staff. 



Electrical Inspection 



During the year 1971 there were 541 Electrical Permits issed and categorized 
as follows: 

New Structures „ 134 

Other (Oil Burners, Temporary 

Service, Remodeling 399 

Gratis. „ „ 8 

Total fees turned over to the Town Treasurer and the Town Collector were 
$2,543.00. 

19 



Fire Department 



The Fire Department is established and maintained by the municipality to 
provide protection of the public against injury, loss of life or property by fire, 
explosions, or other causes. Because of the importance and the hazardous nature 
of this work, the firefighter engaged in it must possess stamina and courage of the 
highest order. In addition, however, he must possess certain specific knowledge 
concerning his work if he is to perform his duties efficiently and with the mini- 
mum risk to himself and his fellow firefighters. He should have detailed knowledge 
of the dangers arising from heat, smoke, explosions, etc., caused by fire; of the 
hazards presented by new industries, processes and materials developed by science; 
of the construction of buildings and the hazards involved in the materials used or 
stored in them; and of the dangers inherent in the use of water at high pressures. 

Objectives of fire prevention are to prevent fires from starting, to prevent 
loss of life and property in case a fire starts, to confine fire to the place of 
origin, and to extinguish it. 

From the point of view of Town Government, this involves services of fire 
prevention and fire fighting. Fire Fighting, because it requires positive and 
dramatic action, has a far greater appeal for people than have fire preventing 
measures which involve restrictions, prohibitions, and administrative "interference" 
with what is termed "individual rights." 

The Fire Department installs, repairs, and maintains a coded fire alarm 
system comprising some three million feet of wiring, both aerial and underground, 
and associated street boxes and station equipment for controlling the system. The 
Department operates from three Stations; Headquarters housed at the new Public 
Safety Center; the Ballardvale and the West Andover Sub-Stations. Its fifty-one 
men use seven pieces of fire fighting equipment, including an emergency ambulance. 

Quarterly inspections of nursing homes, hospitals and Inns as required by 
State Statutes were conducted and the necessary reports filed with the proper au- 
thorities. Public and Private School fire drills and inspections required by law 
were conducted. Mercantile, Industrial, Churches, Garages and Service Stations 
were inspected and reports filed. Findings and recommendations were sent to owners 
and/or occupants of dwelling houses of three or more apartments. In-Service in- 
spections were conducted from all stations using radio-controlled fire apparatus 
and a full complement of firefighters. Permits for oil storage, flammable liquid 
storage and all associated equipment were issued. Blasting permits and the new 
Model Rocketry permits were issued in accordance with the State Law. 

As in past years, the major causes of fires were carelessness, the misuse of 
smoking materials, children and matches and faulty electrical appliances and wiring. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 

1971 1970 1969 

Service Calls 1,777 1,672 2,402 

Fires 432 493 520 

False Alarms 51 43 22 

Mutual Aid Calls 7 3 16 

Approximate Value of 

Buildings where a $34,380,440.00 $32,195,965.00 $25,630,986.00 
Fire occurred 

20 



1971 1970 1969 

Approximate Loss 
from Fire $ 121,127.25 $ 862,505.27 $ 84,510.96 

Ambulance Calls 554 548 591 

Non-residents billed 167 140 179 

for Ambulance Service 

Fuel Oil Heat Installation 100 92 78 

Permits Issued 

Explosive Use Permits 20 19 32 

Issued 

Building Inspections 932 926 907 

Fire Drills 115 147 97 

Fatalities from Fire 

Flammable Liquids or 33 10 12 

Explosive Storage Permits 
Issued 

Welding and Cutting 6 8 14 

Operation Permits Issued 

Fireworks Display Permits 2 10 

Issued 

Rocketry Permits Issued 36 27 

Permits to abandon 2 3 4 

Underground Tanks Issued 



Game Warden 



During the year 1971, the Game Warden and his Deputy conducted approximately 316 
investigations of all kinds and checked over 500 fishing and hunting licenses. 

During the year, hearings were held with some of the townspeople along with the 
Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen in an effort to work out some of the 
problemswhich have been created by hunting in certain sections of the town. In 
some areas of the town where hunting violations were particularly severe, signs were 
posted in conspicuous places to alleviate the problems. 

Intensive patrolling was initiated in the Fall and, for all general purposes, hunt- 
ing was eliminated. 

The coming of Fall and snow presented a problem with snowmobiles and trail bikes. 
Many initial warnings were given and the laws relating to the violations were 
issued. In most cases, violators were very cooperative and proved to be ignorant 
of the existing laws. 

Local enforcement officers under the direction of Natural Resources Officer Arthur 
Wickey ran hunter safety courses for boys and girls between the ages of 14 and 16 
years of age. This department also spent approximately 2000 hours on patrol work 
during the year. 

The Game Warden and his Deputy are appreciative of the fine cooperation received 
from Police Chief David L. Nicoll and the members of the Andover Police Department. 

21 



Dog Officer 






Lost Dogs. o 101 

Dogs Found 71 

Dogs Ordered Restrained 74 

Dog Complaints 510 

Dogs Sold 31 

Money turned in to Town Treasurer - Dogs Sold- $93.00 
Owners Contacted for Having Unlicensed Dogs . . .426 

Cats turned in to Pound 93 

Various Dead Animals picked up 102 

Impounded Dogs (Unlicensed) 125 

Impounded Dogs (Licensed) „ 7 



Police Department 



In 1971, the Police Department received 5,658 complaints/requests for which 
some police action was necessary. This represents an increase of 699 over the year 
1970. 

There were 183 cases of breaking and entering in town and 23 attempted breaks 
were reported. This is an increase of 45 cases of breaking and entering and one 
attempted break less than in 1970. 

During the year 1971, there were 133 cases of larceny of property valued at 
over $50.00, which is an increase of 5 cases over the year 1970. In the category 
of property valued at less than $50.00, in 1971 there were 301 cases reported, an 
increase of 69 cases. Of the 301 cases involved, 132 were bicycle thefts. In 1970 
there were 101 bicycle thefts reported. 

There were 1,665 parking tickets issued in 1971. 

There were 711 motor vehicle accidents reported in Andover. There were three 
fatal accidents, 185 personal injury accidents and 523 property damage accidents. 
One of the fatal accidents involved a pedestrian in Andover Square, one involved a 
motorist who struck a tree on Lupine Road and the third took place on Route 93, in 
which a passenger in a motor vehicle was killed when the car struck a steel post 
and went off the road throwing the passenger out of the vehicle. The winter months- 
January, February, November and December are the worst months as far as traffic 
accidents are concerned. 326 accidents occurred during this period. Routes 93 and 
495 accounted for 127 accidents, 79 on Route 93 and 48 on Route 495. 

During the past year, the police cars travelled 333,895 miles. 

In 1971, there were 448 persons arraigned in court either by arrest or by sum- 
mons. This is 78 fewer than 1970. There were 102 persons arrested for drunkenness, 
including 8 juveniles. Of the 8 juveniles arrested for being drunk, 6 were 15 
years of age and 2 were 16. There were 38 persons arrested for driving under the 
influence of liquor, 6 of them being under 21 years of age. 

There were 135 motor vehicle cases in court, 55 of which were for speeding. 

22 



During 1971, there were 58 arrests for drug violations, 25 less than in 1970 o 
Juvenile arrests for drug violations were 12, of which 3 were female and 9 were 
male The ages were from 13 to 16. Of the 12 arrested, 11 were for marijuana and 
1 for dangerous non-narcotic drugs. Of the 46 adult drug arrests, 15 were for 
heroin, 29 for marijuana, 1 for synthetic narcotics and 1 for dangerous non-narcotic 
drugs. 

The Police Department issued 247 pistol permits in 1971. 

The following is a comparison chart of statistics of major police activities 
for the past five years: 



Complaints 

Breaking and Entering 

Larceny: 

Over $50.00 

Under $50.00 
Stolen Cars 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 
Motor Vehicle Injuries 
Motor Vehicle Deaths 
Motor Vehicle Violations 
Cruiser Mileage 283,771 320,679 328,089 328,722 333,895 



1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


1971 


3,425 


3,820 


4,481 


4,959 


5,658 


94 


128 


155 


138 


183 


113 


100 


135 


128 


133 


175 


147 


189 


232 


301 


56 


40 


76 


43 


72 


562 


632 


614 


700 


711 


252 


283 


226 


258 


287 


4 


5 


6 


3 


3 


486 


464 


212 


148 


117 



325th Anniversary 



The preparations for the 325th Anniversary of the Town of Andover began when 
the 1970 Town Meeting voted $5,000 for the celebration. Commencing in September, 
1970, the appointed committee met sixteen times developing a program for a four-day 
celebration on May 28-31, 1971. Following are the members of the committee: Chair- 
man, Sidney P. White; Secretary, Miss Marion E. Hill; Municipal Liaison, Miss Anna 
M. Greeley; Clergy, Rev. J. Everett Bodge and Rev. Kenneth Kennedy, OSA; Music, J. 
Everett Collins; Parade, Elmer S. Ober and David MacDonald, Jr ; Historical, George 
W. Glennie, Leo Daley, Anthony S. Didio, and Charles Currier; Publicity, Robert E. 
Finneran, Frederick S. Allis, Jr., and John H.Fenton; Pageant, Mrs. James Carson 
and William Joliffe; Banquet, William V. Emmons and Edward A. Romeo; Flowers, Mrs. 
Ralph H. Hill; Athletic Events, Leslie Bartow and Recreation Committee; Store Deco- 
rations, Theodore Cole and Mrs. David Darling; and Students, Mrs. Walter H. Part- 
ridge and William A. Doherty 

The official opening was a banquet held at Phillips Academy gymnasium on Fri- 
day night when Donald Cole, an Andover native and history professor at Phillips Ex- 
eter, gave the main speech, "Andover in the 19th Century." On Saturday an exten- 
sive program of athletic events took place during the day. A pageant entitled 
"Generations" was presented both Saturday and Sunday evenings in the East Junior 
High School Auditorium. On Sunday a worship service was held at Cochran Chapel, 
Phillips Academy, with the Reverend A. Graham Baldwin speaking on "A Faith for Our 
Times" and music provided under the direction of J. Everett Collins. On Monday, 
following Memorial Day services, an outstanding parade headed by General Chairman 
Sidney P. White as Marshall was held. Under the direction of Elmer S. Ober and 
David MacDonald, Jr., the parade contained many bands, floats, and marchers. 

23 



Interesting projects supplementary to the observance were Andover Historical 
Society's slide presentations on Old Andover, photographic coverage and recordings, 
Andover Garden Club's efforts in helping to restore the beauty of the Town Hall and 
other areas of the town, historic costumes worn by the Town Hall employees during 
the celebration, historical displays at the Memorial Hall Library keyed to the anni- 
versary, and greetings sent to Andover, England. It should be noted that the com- 
mittee incorporated in order to handle properly all financing of the celebration. 

There were two booklets printed: "Andover — The Last 25 Years 1946 - 1971," 
prepared by Frederick S. Allis, Jr., assisted by Robert E. Finneran and John H. 
Fenton and subsidized by the banks of the area; and "Historic Andover," compiled by 
George W. Glennie, President of the Andover Historical Society, with valued assist- 
ance from Raytheon Company members Anthony S. Didio and Vincent Foley. 

Following is a financial report of the 325th Anniversary Committee: 

Receipts : 

Town Appropriation $5,000.00 

Banquet 3,982.50 

Generations 1,007.00 
Sale of Books 777.15 

Donations 1,123 .42 $11,890.07 

Disbursements : 

Banquet $3,717.27 

Generations 3,175.72 

Books 2,485.00 

Sports Program 20.65 

Parade 748.85 

Photography 115.00 

Miscellaneous 1,466.76 11,729.25 

Balance to Town of Andover $ 160.82 



Historical Commission 



The Andover Historical Commission was established by vote of the 1970 Annual 
Town Meeting. Following appointment of its members in May of 1971, the Commission 
has held monthly meetings in Memorial Hall Library. The Commission intends to play 
a vital part in Andover in the years ahead in order that the town's historic assets 
may be preserved, promoted, and developed. The Commission has similar responsibil- 
ities and authority in relation to historical assets as the Conservation Commission 
has in relation to the conservation of the town's natural resources. The major re- 
sponsibilities of the Commission fall into the following four basic areas: 

1. Preservation, promotion, and development of the town's historical assets; 

2. Research and coordination of activities of unofficial bodies organized for 
similar purposes; 

3. Recommendation of the Town's Historic Landmarks, plus the acquisition of 
such properties; and 

4. Preparation for the 200th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence 
and Andover' s part thereof. 

During the first four months of operation, the Commission has coordinated its 
activities with the Regional Director of Essex County Preservation Planning Board 
and was pleased to have Mrs. George F. Amadon explain the accomplishments in other 
surrounding communities. Another meeting was held with Mr. Marc Sweet, a member of 
the former Historic District Study Commission, who reported on the work accomplished 

24 



by that body. He reported that a survey of his Study Commission discovered that 
Andover did not have any Historic District per se, but it did have historic sites 
which should be lined up and brought to the attention of the Planning Board. Also 
planned is a survey of the Andover Historical Society records to pick out 25 or 30 
of the most important sites. A study of the Junior League survey of historic sites 
is also planned. 

It is sincerely hoped that the Commission will fulfill its intended establish- 
ment and prove to be a lasting and beneficial organization of the Town of Andover. 



AVIS 



In August, 1971, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Farnsworth kindly granted a "Conservation 
Restriction" to Andover Village Improvement Society (AVIS) on a 5§ acre parcel of 
woodland situated off 44 Porter Road. This restriction assures that the Parcel will 
be retained as conservational land in its natural condition and will not be devel- 
oped. 

In September, 1971, The Society of Friars Minor of the Order of St. Francis, 
which owns a considerable wooded frontage along the Merrimack River to the rear of 
its Seminary, shortly above the upstream end of AVIS Deer Jump Reservation, gra- 
ciously permitted the use of this wooded land for hiking, with the stipulation that 
the hiking be done well within the wooded area, to avoid intrusion upon the privacy 
of the Seminary in the open area toward River Road. AVIS requests that anyone 
hiking on this land be careful to observe this stipulation. This river frontage is 
very rugged in character and provides a good test of hiking ability. 

In November, 1971, through the generosity of Mr. Fred Doyle, AVIS received as 
a gift a five acre parcel of woodland situated west of Fish Brook, off the west side 
of Route 93, near the north side of AVIS Harold R. Rafton Reservation. 

The Town Trail Committee, the chairman of which is Mr. Alan F. French, 3rd 
Vice-President of AVIS, is actively working to complete a town trail system, which 
will include trails on AVIS reservations. 

AVIS reservations have been receiving increasing usage for sports consistent 
with their primary objective of conservation, both by individuals and Scout groups. 
The two most notable events of the year were canoe races and a Boy Scout Camporee. 
The canoe races were staged on the Shawsheen River on May 1, 1971, from Ballardvale, 
along AVIS Vale and Shawsheen River Reservations to the Central Street exit of the 
latter reservation. It was a gala occasion, fortunately graced by perfect weather. 
Over forty canoes were entered, and about 400 persons, participants and onlookers, 
enjoyed the event. It is hoped to make this an annual feature. The Camporee was 
held the weekend of October 8-10, 1971, and included all the Boy Scout troops in 
the Shawsheen District of the North Essex Council, which numbered about 350, includ- 
ing boys and leaders. Through the kindness of Mr. L. John Davidson, permission was 
given to use a field of his on High Plain Road, adjacent to AVIS Harold R. Rafton 
Reservation. This 213 acre reservation furnished opportunities for the Scout ac- 
tivities in trail construction and hiking programs. 

In our previous report, we referred to the importance of the Shawsheen River 
as one of the most valuable natural assets of Andover. We are pleased to record 
the formation of a new organization, the "Shawsheen River Watershed Association" 
(S.R.W.A.), of which AVIS has become a member „ It embraces all the communities 
along the river, and has undertaken the specific task of cleaning up the river and 
reducing its pollution. It is also investigating the very important matter of the 
withdrawal of large quantities of water from the river to supply a new 550 million 
gallon capacity reservoir in the town of Burlington, which is being constructed to 
increase the water supply of that town. The S.R.W.A. wants to be assured that the 
ecology of the river below Burlington will not be adversely affected. This is, of 
course, a matter of vital interest to all the downstream communities, including 
Andover. 

25 



Conservation Commission 



Moving ahead with its open space acquisition program, the Conservation Commis- 
sion completed two purchases of land in 1971: 

1. Approximately ten acres of land with about 1360' frontage bordering 
the Merrimack River behind the Vocational School, formerly the 
Strazzulla property. 

2. Approximately thirty-five acres of land on the north side of Wood 
Hill, part of the so-called "Haggetts Hill" subdivision, off 
Haggetts Pond Road. This brings a total town-owned acreage in the 
control of the Conservation Commission to approximately 370 „ 

The Department of Natural Resources made an award of $7,500 from the state 
Self-Help Fund, for fifty percent of the cost of the Strazzula property. 

The Annual Town Meeting voted to make two transfers to the Conservation Fund: 
1. $18,700.00, the amount of the Self-Help reimbursement for the Garabedian pur- 
chase of land along Fish Brook and 2. $35,000.00, the amount of the Self-Help 
reimbursement for the Shlakis purchase between Brundrett Avenue, Fish Brook and the 
Merrimack River. 

Under investigation, consideration or negotiation for purchase at year's end 
were a number of additional parcels of land: along the Merrimack River, along Fish 
Brook, in the vicinity of Haggetts Pond and Wood Hill, in the vicinity of the Ando- 
ver Country Club, and in the Skug River drainage area in the eastern part of town. 

Annual Town Meeting voted to construct the third dike at Pomps Pond, between 
the Girl Scout property and Fosters' Island, so-called, the other two dikes having 
been completed in the late summer of 1970. The plan to use the wells in the vicin- 
ity to maintain the water level at Pomps during the summer drought had to be sus- 
pended in 1971 because of the shortage of town water, and water quality for bathing 
declined this year in consequence. Vandalism of the control structure on the two 
dikes so far completed has been a problem, as has the access afforded to Fosters' 
Island for recreational vehicles by the dikes. The control structures are now 
effectively sealed, and the access to Fosters' Island blocked at the Shawsheen River 
dike. 

The Pomps Pond Park plan was completed this year by the Recreation and Open 
Space Advisory Committee under the Chairmanship of Mrs„ James Keck. Two parcels of 
land under the control of the Conservation Commission lie within the framework of 
this plan: half of the former Essex Company gravel pit which will include a parking 
area, a track for recreational vehicles and a multi-purpose grass area, and Fosters' 
Island, which will remain essentially as it now is and be used as a hiking and wild- 
life observation area and for limited camping. No vehicles will be allowed access to 
this area. 

Members of the Commission completed clearing and marking trails on Fosters' 
Island o Local Girl Scouts helped in this work and also planted cedar trees along 
the border of the wildlife marsh, near Pomps Pond, and wild blueberry bushes on the 
dike near the pond. Under the direction of Mr. Busby, the Park Department loamed, 
seeded and mulched with wood chips this dike near the pond and its approaches. 

Much hard thought was given to the problems posed by use of conservation land 
by recreational and other vehicles „ Permission to use two conservation areas for 
snowmobiling issued in the fall of 1970 was rescinded in the fall of 1971, in re- 
sponse to the growing number of complaints. At present, none of the areas under 
Conservation Commission control is open to any vehicular use. Certain areas are 
now being patrolled by a state officer of the Division of Marine-Recreational 
Vehicles, who is empowered to enforce the state statute controlling such vehicles. 

26 



Permission to hunt on certain of the areas under Conservation Commission juris- 
diction was sought by a group of local hunters, another management matter which oc- 
cupied much time and attention in 1971 . Hunting use had to be denied on all areas 
except one (near Haggetts Pond) because of the terms of the local hunting by-laws 

which stringently restrict areas which may be hunted. 

Under its new chairman, Alan French, the Trails Subcommittee was very active 
in 1971 with several new members: Ginna Riddiford, William Stevens, John Bennett 
and Richard Sullivan. With the generous and public-spirited permission of Mr. Fred 
Doyle, a two mile loop of hiking trail between Lowell Street and High Plain Road 
was opened to the public in December, the first new trail to be cleared and marked 
by the Committee, and an important link between the open areas of the central part 
of town and those of West Andover. 

In May 1971, the Conservation Commission received the annual award for conser- 
vation-oriented community service given by the Essex Conservation District. This 
award, a golden chain tree, was planted in the Andover Park in front of the East 
Junior High School by the Tree Department. 

Mrs. Waters Kellogg of the Conservation Commission serves as an Andover dele- 
gate to the newly formed Shawsheen River Watershed Association, with representatives 
from all communities through which the river passes; concerned with achieving and 
maintaining a stream free of pollution. Mrs. Kellogg has been elected a Director 
of the Association. 

Firm opposition by the Conservation Commission and others to the plan to make 
use of a portion of Carmel Woods, now under the management of the Conservation Com- 
mission, for new housing for the elderly, caused the Housing Authority to look 
elsewhere for a more suitable site. 

In November, the Andover Conservation Commission was host to the third meeting 
of the annual school for Conservation Commissions, co niucted by the Northeast Re- 
gional Extension District under the direction of Mr. Ralph Goodno, for the informa- 
tion, help and guidance of Conservation Commissions in this area. The subject of 
the panel discussion, held at the Library, was "Strategy for Conservation Commis- 
sions". 

Various members of the Conservation Commission participated in meetings and 
conferences called by the Town Manager to deal with specific problems: for example, 
the use and abuse of town-owned lands, the planning of the so-called Lawrence Con- 
nector road crossing the West Andover Industrial Park from downtown Lawrence to 
Route 93, the evaluation of alternate dump sites, and hunting on town-owned land. 

In December, three members of the Commission attended a briefing session held 
in Bedford jointly by the State Department of Natural Resources and the Massachu- 
setts Association of Conservation Commissions, to inform Conservation Commissions 
of their new duties under Chapter 1021 of the Acts of 1971. This amendment trans- 
fers responsibility for the holding of hearings under the so-called Hatch Act 
(designed to limit filling and dredging of wetlands) and subsequent local recommen- 
dations to the Department of Natural Resources from the local Board of Selectmen to 
the local Conservation Commission. 

In April, the Commission accepted with regret the resignation of Frederic A. 
Stott, who had served as a member of the Commission since 1964. In October, the 
Town Manager appointed Warren Oldaker to succeed Mr. Stott. 

Development and Industrial Commission 

During 1971 the Development and Industrial Commission took part in meetings 
dealing tith the "Lawrence Connector." It opposes a routing which would slice 
through the West Andover residential area and favors a routing which would make use 
of the existing I-93/River Road Interchange and then run between Conservation land 
and the Regional Vocational School. 

27 



The Commission strongly urged that a Ballardvale Bypass be built to relieve 
traffic conditions on River Street and in Ballardvale Center. Planning funds were 
voted in the October Town Meeting. The Commission presented its case to the con- 
sultants in a meeting attended also by interested industrial and residential prop- 
erty owners, Town officials, and others. 

Upon the request of this Commission, the Planning Board put before the October 
Town Meeting an article requiring landscaping of industrial river front. The art- 
icle was accepted. 

The Commission continued to press for negotiations with Lawrence to enable 
Andover's consultants to design a trunk sewer which would serve the West Andover 
Industrial Zone. It is hoped that the new Lawrence City Administration will inter- 
est itself actively in this matter. 

The Commission alerted all affected Andover industrialists to a hearing, 
called by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District, in which the proposed regulations 
covering the discharge of industrial effluent into the District sewer system were 
discussed . 

In the Selectmen's hearings, the Commission recommended that the full cost of 
water, i.e., both operating and capital cost, be recovered by the water bills 
(rather than by property tax) since this will be an incentive, especially to the 
larger consumers, to conserve this natural resource. Industrial water use has in- 
creased not nearly so rapidly as industrial valuation: 

Water Consumption 

(Million Gallo ns) 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 

Total Town 
Industrial 
% Industrial 

Industrial valuation has tripled in the three years from January 1. 1968, to 
January 1, 1971, and amounts to almost 15% of the Andover total. Industrial real 
estate paid over one and a third million dollars in taxes in 1971. The following 
table illustrates this growth: 

Year Total Town Valuation Industry Valuation 



871 


774 


892 


1 


,029 


1 


,098 


1 


,143 


225 


173 


184 




185 




298 




391 


26% 


22% 


21% 




18% 




27% 




34% 



1/1/68 $163,423,300 $ 9,828,000 




6 


.00 


Growth: 12,132,700 6,024,100 








1/1/69 175,556,000 15,852,100 




9, 


.03 


Growth: 12,943,500 6,731.900 








1/1/70 188,499,500 22,584,000 




11 


.98 


Growth: 12,581,200 7,028,100 








1/1/71 201,080,700 29,612,100 




14 


.73 


Taxes paid by industry: 46/1000 x $29,612,100 = $1,362, 


,157 






Expenditures for benefit of industry: 








Bonds (Principal and Interest) 195, 


,935 






From revenue (special articles and as part of general 








budget, landfill being the biggest item) 190. 


,000 






Net Profit $ 976, 


,222 







(But for this sum, the 1971 tax rate would be five dollars higher.) 
Industrial construction in 1971 includes the following: a boiler house by New 
England Milk Producers on Haverhill Street, a warehouse by the Harry Hirschberg Co. 
in Ballardvale, and a manufacturing plant by General Service Foam in Lowell Junction. 



Fourth of July Celebration 



Once again, in 1971, the Andover Service Club took charge of the Fourth of 
July Celebration. Under the chairmanship of John D Lewis and with the cooperation 

28 



of the Board of Public Works, the Recreation Department, and various other organi- 
zations in town, the event was held on Sunday, the 4th, 

Among the activities conducted during the day were the following: art show, 
horse show, bicycle/tricycle decorating contest, pie and water melon eating con- 
tests water ball fight, truck and antique car rides, pony rides, and four other 
"fun"'rides. Ronald MacDonald appeared at 11:45 a.m., to the delight of the chil- 
dren and people were entertained by the Redmen's Band from Wakefield, Clan Mac- 
Pherson, and Music by Truth. A calliope again toured the town during the day, and 
there were the usual booths selling cotton candy, hot dogs, ice cream, and tonic. 
The climax of the celebration was one of the largest displays of fireworks seen in 
town in many years. 

The townspeople are grateful to the Andover Service Club, Andona Society, 4-H 
Club, Knights of Columbus, Council on Aging, Masons, Andover Artists' Guild, the 
Ballardvale United Church, and numerous local businesses for their help, both finan- 
cial and physical, in making the day a great success. 



Recreation 



The Andover Recreation Department provides suitable land areas and facilities 
for a broad variety of recreational activities. The Department exists to serve and 
assist townspeople in taking advantage of these facilities. 

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES : 

There are approximately 50 acres of land used specifically for recreational 
purposes in Andover. They include 5 playgrounds, 2 softball diamonds (1 lighted), 
2 picnic areas, a sliding/coasting area, and 2 court areas. This year a concrete 
multi-purpose area was completed at Recreation Park. Pomps Pond, sixteen acres in 
size, is used for Andover ' s free summer swimming program. Playground equipment was 
installed adjacent to the pond this past summer. 

There are three buildings under the Recreation Department's supervision within 
this acreage: Shawsheen Building on Iceland Road and the Ballardvale Community 
Center on Center Street, both available as meeting places for groups and organiza- 
tions, and Recreation Park Lodge, available to Andover residents without charge, 
suitable for parties, meetings, outings, camping, etc., subject to the Recreation 
Department's regulations. 

Where necessary or indicated, the Recreation Department utilizes school gyms 
and auditoriums for activities and programs and occasionally uses privately-owned 
facilities . 

STAFF : 

There is currently only one full time staff member employed by the Recreation 
Department. On December 3, Assistant Recreation Director John Milne resigned to 
join the Andover Police Department, and on December 31, Recreation Director Leslie 
Bartow completed his services. 

The Recreation Department employed over 50 people on a seasonal basis in 1971, 
primarily during the summer months. These included playground personnel, Pomps 
Pond instructors and guards, the Special Education Playground staff, maintenance 
men and sports officials. The Student Activity Center supervisors are employed on 
a part time basis throughout the year. 

The Recreation Department depends heavily on volunteers throughout the year. 
Many programs, including Special Education bowling, Special Education Scouts, ten- 
nis lessons, and the Sunday afternoon gym program are staffed entirely by volun- 
teers. 

In February and March two maintenance men from the Greater Lawrence Community 
Action Council Special Manpower Program were assigned to the Department. Under the 
direction of the Assistant Recreation Director they were able to construct much 

29 



needed picnic tables and benches, paint the interior of Recreation Park Lodge, re- 
build the Pomps Pond floats, place covers on the dikes at Foster's Island, and 
provide general maintenance. During the summer months two regular full time main- 
tenance men were employed to set up and take down playground equipment and deal 
with the increased maintenance generated by the summer programs and increased van- 
dalism. The Department of Public Works assisted the Recreation Department through- 
out the year with some maintenance problems, and major repairs were contracted to 
private firms. 

ACTIVITIES : 

The Recreation Department is involved with programs and activities in three 
ways. It initiates and runs programs, it assists with equipment, clerical work 
and publicity or provides facilities or financial support. 

ANDOVER RECREATION DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS : 

Following are the programs held during the year: 8-week summer playgound, 
summer bus service to Pomps Pond, summer band concerts, "30 & Over" basketball 
league, ice skating, Easter Egg Hunt, Special Education bowling, 8-week movie 
program, Special Education playground program, indoor Sunday gym program for pri- 
mary grades, Winter Carnival during the February school vacation, Scout Government 
days, SAC, inter-school sports tournaments during school vacations, tennis lessons, 
and Pomps Pond swimming instruction. 

ASSISTED IN CONJUNCTION WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS : 

In conjunction with other organizations the Department assisted the following: 
Special Education Scouts, Special Education Little League, Andover Softball League, 
325th Anniversary Celebration, Fourth of July Celebration, and the Church Basket- 
ball League. 

ASSISTED FINANCIALLY : 

Financial assistance was given the following: Andover Badminton League and 
The West Andover Community Center. 

COORDINATION AND PUBLIC RELATIONS : 

The Recreation Department publishes annually a directory listing all activi- 
ties and organizations in Andover, whether public or private, to aid Townspeople's 
awareness of their recreational opportunities. 

Andover is fortunate in the scope and variety of the facilities available 
through the Recreation Department and other agencies. A committee is currently 
studying how best all these resources might be utilized, independently or coopera- 
tively, by the greatest number for the greatest advantage. 



John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund 

On Hand, January 1, 1971 $2,603.59 
Received thru Interest 258. 62 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1972 $2,862.21 

Money on Deposit as follows: 

Andover Savings Bank, Andover Book #13259 $1,000.00 

Essex-Broadway Savings Bank, Lawrence Book #82865 2,000.00 

City Inst. Savings Bank, Lowell Book #69782 1,000.00 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell Book #21760 1,000.00 

Merrimack Valley Natl. Bank, Andover Checking Account 2,862.21 



30 



School Department 



In 1971, Andover was a microcosm. The economic status of our nation signifi- 
cantly affected a willingness by local citizens to support public expenditures. Al- 
though public officials feel the economic decision by the community to reduce ex- 
penditures was not a prudent course of action, it was recognized, understood, and 
accepted. 

As Superintendent of Schools, I feel 1971 was a year of significant educational 

accomplishment. Although the accomplishments could have been greater, I feel the 

Andover School System did extremely well with the resources given by the community. 
I would like to highlight some of the advances with you. 

1. NEW PROGRAMS: Andover instituted individualized programs in reading and 
mathematics. We became the first school system in the state to achieve this mile- 
stone. Teachers, administrators, parents, and students deserve considerable credit 
for their patience and understanding in implementing the program. We are very much 
aware that such programs have not been accepted by all members of the community. 
Further discussion and information is still needed to further inform the community 
on the rationale and specifics of such programs. The elective English program at 
the high school is also a successful program introduced in 1971. 

2. BUDGET SLOW DOWN: For the second consecutive year the dollar increase was 
less than the year before. Such a goal was mandated two years previously by the 
school committee. 

3. ARTICULATION: Significant progress was made in the cooperation of adminis- 
trators and teachers among the elementary, junior high, and senior high schools. 
Department heads from the various subject areas began a deliberate effort to make a 
continuous program, kindergarten to graduation. We recognize the community concern 
of "What happens when my child goes to junior high?" or 'What is the relationship be- 
tween the junior high and the senior high?" We have not achieved our goal of a con- 
tinuous program, but we are well on our way. 

4. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: The Andover School System feels an informed, in- 
volved community makes for a healthy relationship. The P.T.O. Council, representing 
all schools, is fast becoming a productive group. The School Committee established 
three advisory committees: Climate for Learning, Open Campus, and the Extended 
School Year. Representation on these committees covered a good cross section of the 
town. They will present their findings and recommendations later this year. 

5. USE OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS: Many and various types of groups began to take 
advantage of the "Open Door" policy for using the facilities. A vote of thanks and 
appreciation should be given to the custodians for their willingness and cooperation 
in making the policy successful. 

6. STUDENTS' FEELINGS: The staff has been very much concerned regarding the 
psychological attitude of the student body. Deliberate studies and ideas are being 
formulated regarding student motivation. Such activities by the staff are most 
noteworthy. Student motivation is one of the biggest problems facing education to- 
day . 

7. IN-SERVICE PROGRAM: This year over 75% of our staff participated in self- 
improvement programs. Such programs that have direct benefit for the Andover School 
System have been important contributions to our curriculum and students. 

8. VOLUNTEER HELP: We asked for volunteer help and the response from the com- 
munity was most gratifying. Many individuals gave unselfishly of their time and en- 
ergy. Such effort is greatly appreciated by the staff and students. 

9. I.G.E. (INDIVIDUALLY GUIDED EDUCATION): Two of our elementary schools, 
South and Shawsheen, were selected to participate in a national program. Such a 
program involves information sharing, individualized instruction, multi-age grouping, 

31 



and intense self evaluation. This is quite a distinction for both schools. 

10. OPENING LINES OF COMMUNICATION: We feel gains have been made, but only 
time will tell . 

In anticipation, 1972 looks like a year of significant progress and an attempt 
to get a greater community understanding of the programs and problems of educating 
our children. 

Personally, I feel every community is under terrific pressure and timetables 
to provide alternatives for our students. Both staff and parents must realize that 
student lives, desires, and values are just as different and varied as the adult 
population. If we don't provide structures to educate for such diversity, I am 
afraid the psychological and physical dropout rate will increase significantly. 
Such alternatives need the understanding and commitment by the large majority of the 
community . 



G.L.R.V.T. High School 



Vocational education has been repeatedly pointed out lately in the press by 
many educators and national public officials as a success story in education. Edu- 
cational psychologists say that in vocational education, the students are in "focus" 
— that they see their school work as relating to the real world and that is why vo- 
cational education has not been beset with major unrest. 

Well, frankly, we try to teach real world skills and attitudes because we be- 
lieve, as Thoreau once stated, "that education isn't just a preparation for life, 
it is life" and we have pride in our students and their willingness to accept real 
world responsibilities and attitudes. 

The nation at this time is at the beginning of an era of a large expansion in 
vocational education. According to a recent Department of Labor report, by 1980 
only 20% of our job openings will require college educations. Mr. Walter N. Borg, 
Chairman of the Massachusetts Commission for Occupational Education, has stated, 
"the first priority in Massachusetts is a massive expansion of occupational pro- 
grams to reach a greater number and variety of students." This same message is 
being stated in various ways throughout the nation. One of the results of this 
awakening will undoubtedly be more federal and state monetary support in the future. 

Construction on our expansion building began on June 8, 1971, and by virtue of 
a recent amendment to the state laws, applying to all public education construction, 
the state will now pay 65% of the interest on the bond costs, as well as 65% of the 
bond principal costs This change in law will be reflected in a savings to the tax- 
payers of the region. 

In line with the more progressive vocational education areas and national 
goals, our programs continue to grow, and to illustrate this point pictorially, we 
have prepared two graphs . 

Graph No. 1 - shows the growth of our day school from 1966 to the present with 
a 1972 projection covering our new expansion building. 

Graph No. 2 - shows the growth of our evening school for adults from 1966 to 
the present with a 1972 projection covering our new expansion 
building. 



32 





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33 



We feel that 1971 was a year of accomplishment and look forward to the new 
year. In summary, we feel that 1971 highlights from a local impact were: 

1. An increase of the day school enrollment from 678 to 772, the maximum 
present capacity. 

2. An increase of the evening school enrollment from 990 to 1859, near maxi- 
mum present capacity. 

3. An increase in the Industrial Entry programs designed for high school stu- 
dents from the four commununities from 116 to 217. 

4. Job placement of 100% of our graduates in spite of poor business conditions. 

5. Increase in students placed in Cooperative Education programs with 49 local 
employers from 73 to 105 students. 

6. Use of the school's facilities on 278 days/nights by various civic and com- 
munity non-profit organizations from the four communities. This is in 
keeping with the school's policy of maximum community service. 

7. Enlargement of the school's voluntary advisory committee, to include more 
members from the four communities with various special skills, to aid in 
the planned education programs to be housed in the expansion building. 

8. The start of construction of the expansion building on June 8, 1971. 

9. The enactment of Chapter 1010 to the state laws by which the state pays 
65% of interest charges. 

With the increasing demand for a realistic education for both the young and 
older members of our society, we find that unlike some municipalities, we are for- 
tunate in joining the general education school pattern in providing comprehensive 
education on a regional basis. This is essential if we face the fact that not all 
people want to go to college. Moreover, realistically it is economically more sound 
to spend our school dollars on a product (student) that is an asset, as a happy in- 
dividual and a productive citizen in a gainful occupation with an opportunity for 
periodic upgrading. 

It is in this vein that our citizenry must be congratulated for the effort and 
foresight that they have experienced in making it possible to meet the challenge of 
the times through the expansion of our school facilities. 

The expansion of our facilities serves many purposes to be sure, but chief 
among these are two: 

1. Our nation's greatest resource - a productive member of society, the stu- 
dent in fruitful endeavor. 

2. A usable product for industry - the bulwark of our tax base. 

Analysis of enrollment statistics indicated the following: 
Day School Enrollment by Grade and Community: 



Municipal 


ity 










Grade 


















9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


PG 


1 


PG 


2 


Total 


Andover 


15 


4 


9 


9 


3 


7 









1 


48 


Lawrence 




141 


99 


82 


74 


9 


24 




8 




2 


439 


Methuen 




57 


49 


53 


39 


10 


21 




4 




1 


234 


North Andover 


14 


10 


12 


9 





4 









2 


51 



227 162 156 131 22 56 12 6 772 

34 



Evening School Enrollment by community 

Municipality 

Andover 
Lawrence 
Met hue n 
North Andover 

Non-res idents 
Total 

Report on Graduates, June 1971: 



Number of Students 

246 
790 
371 
129 

323 



1,859 



Grade 


Number 
Graduated 

126 

12 

es 6 

37 


Number 
Placed 

101 

8 

6 

37 


Average 
Salary 

2.27 hr. 
3.00 hr. 
3.00 hr. 
3.00 hr. 


Armed 
Services 

11 
1 




Higher 
Education 


Grade 12 
Grade 14 
Post-Graduat 
L P N's 


14 
3 




Total 


181 




152 




12 


17 






PERSONNEL 


STATISTICS 







Administration: 

(Superintendent of District . . . 1/2 

(Director of School 1/2 

Assistant Director 1 

Vocational Coordinator 1 

Pupil Personnel Services 

Coordinator 1 

Expansion Aide 1 

Office Personnel: 

Principal Clerks 2 

Senior Clerk 1 

Junior Clerks 2 

Part-time Clerks 4 

Accountant 1 

Instructional : 

Academic Instructors 13 

Related Technology Instructors. . 12 

Shop & Laboratory Instructors . . 37 

Librarian 1 

Counselors 2 

Summer School Instructors .... 9 

Summer School Supervisor 1 

Non-instructional : 

Nurse 1 

Audio-Visual Aide 1 

Cafeteria: 

Manager 1 

Full-time Workers 

Part-time workers • . . 6 

Custodial & Bus Driving: 

Plant Superintendent 1 

Custodians 11 



Non-instructional: (cont . ) 
Transportation : 

Busses 11 

Part-time Bus Drivers 10 

Evening School: 

Supervision 2 

Instructors 59 

Industrial Entry (High School Students) 

Supervision 1 

Instructors 11 

School Lunch Participation: 

September 1966 65% 

October 1967 75% 

December 1967 91% 

December 1968 87% 

December 1969 105% 

December 1970 111% 

December 1971 106% 

Athletics: 

Sports Coaches 

Basketball 3 

Baseball 3 

Football 5 

Track 3 

Cross Country 1 

Wrestling 1 

Indoor Track 1 

Hockey 1 

Athletics Coordinator 1 

Golf 1 

^ 3fC 3JC 5fC 3fC 3)C 5fC 



35 



1971 FINANCIAL REPORT 


Transfers 




Adjusted 












Budget 


Within 




Budget 




Total 








Function 


Dollars 


Functions 




Dollars 




Expenditures 


Balance 




General Control $ 


70,470.00 : 


$ 


$ 


70,470. 


00 


$ 64,918.04 


$ 5 ; 


,551 


.96 


Expense of 




















Instruction 


986,490.00 






986,490. 


00 


968,487.86 


18. 


,002, 


.14 


Auxiliary 




















Agencies 


102,898.00 


(12,974.11) 




89,923. 


89 


85,880.29 


4, 


,043. 


.60 


Cost of Trans- 




















portation 


36,815.00 






36,815. 


00 


29,316.41 


7. 


,498. 


,59 


Operation of 




















Plant 


165,445.00 






165,445. 


00 


163,193.25 


2. 


,251. 


75 


Maintenance 




















of Plant 


52,745.00 


3,151.15 




55,896. 


15 


55,896.15 









Special Charges 


52,500.00 


5,555.13 




58,055. 


13 


58,055.13 









Miscellaneous 


8,290.00 


2,033.67 




10,323. 


67 


10,323.67 









Outlay 


42,000.00 


2,234.16 




44,234. 


16 


44,234.16 









Debt Retirement 


370,000.00 






370,000. 


00 


370,000.00 









Debt Service 


306,060.00 
J, 193,713. 00 




306,060. 
$2,193,713. 


00 
00 


306,060.00 
$2,156,364.96 









Total $2 





$37, 


348. 


04 


Unexpended Budget 


Dollars 










$37,348.04 








State Sales and Meals Tax Paid 


in 1971 for 


Productivity 


1,312.54 




















$38,660.58 












* * * * 


* 


* * 












TOTAL 1971 DISTRICT BUDGET 






$2,193,713 








Funds for 


Reduction: 


















School Building Assistance Bureav 


i 


$ 62,260 












Pupil Transportation 


Re im bursement 


35,000 












Chapter 


791, State A 


id 1970 




572,423 












Chapter 


791, State A 


id, Bal. 196E 


l 


34,676 












P.L. 90- 


■576, Balance 


1969 




57 , 600 












P.L. 90- 


■576, LPN Program 1970 




10,002 












P.L. 81- 


-874, Federal 


ly Impacted 
















Area, 


1970 






9,223 












Total Funds for Reduct 


ion 








781,184 









NET TOTAL $1,412,529 

BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 



Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 



$103,300.23 
779,160.93 
425,410.46 
104,657.38 



Veterans' Services 



The year 1971 was a particularly busy one for the Department of Veterans' 
Services in that the depressed economy has brought a demand for more social service 
work in many areas, especially in the employment field. Many persons in the engi- 
neering, technical and management sector have, for the first time, encountered a 
serious shortage of work and, having exhausted their assets, found it necessary to 
seek financial assistance and/or counselling from this office. A number of other 
individuals, in a lower income strata, have also sought our help in finding employ- 
ment. 



36 



Expenditures for the unemployed in the current year were minimal due to the 
availability of federally sponsored work programs and the efforts of this Depart- 
ment in locating jobs in the private sector for many applicants. Recent action by 
the Federal Government may ease the unemployment situation in this area in 1972. 
However, the removal of the local Welfare Office to Lawrence in the immediate future 
will tend to increase the work load of this Department. 

The greater portion of our expenditures in the current year were for income 
supplementation of our elderly, permanent recipients and payment of their ever 
mounting medical expenses. We also assisted seventy-one temporary cases due mainly 
to sickness, injury or unemployment. Fortunately, all were of short duration. Six 
of our elderly, permanent recipients died in 1971. 

Forty-five Andover veterans died in 1971: 20 World War One, 23 World War Two 
and 1 Vietnam career Naval Officer. In each case, the dependents of the veteran 
were contacted and assisted in filing for Veterans Administration benefits, includ- 
ing pension and compensation awards, which, projected over a twelve-month period, 
will bring to residents of Andover cash benefits in excess of $66,000, annually. 



Board of Health 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 



The incidence of Tuberculosis has diminished so noticeably in the past several 
years that the State Department of Public Health is now screening individuals by 
skin tests rather than chest X-rays. This has proved to be reliable, less expensive, 
and less time consuming. The Town of Andover has had only one patient hospitalized 
for Tuberculosis in the past three years. Drug treatment coupled with diligent 
follow-up work has contributed to the decline in the number of cases of this disease. 
At present there are 28 individuals receiving Tuberculostatic chemotherapy. 

An essential health program was provided in St. Augustine's School by volun- 
teer nurses and a volunteer dental hygienist under the supervision and direction of 
the Public Health Nurse. 

There has been only one case of mumps reported this year, which proves the 
value of preventive medicine by means of immunization. 

CLINICS SPONSORED 

The following clinics were sponsored by the Board of Health in 1971: 

Vision Screening Program for children under five years of age was conducted by 
volunteers from the Andona Society. Four hundred eighteen children were tested and 
this number was by far the largest group screened to date. 

Rabies Clinic, conducted by Dr. Lindsay, was held on two Saturdays in April. 
Two hundred twenty-three dogs were vaccinated. Although this is a much smaller 
number than usual, the decrease is because new vaccine now being used is adequate 
for protection for two years instead of one year. 

The following contagious diseases were reported to the Board of Health: 



1969 



1970 



1971 



Animal Bites 

Chickenpox 

Dysentery, Bacillary 

German Measles 

Gonorrhea 

Hepatitis, Infectious 

Malaria 

Meningitis 



66 


89 


95 


59 


87 


19 





3 


1 


1 








9 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 








1 





1 






37 



Contagious Diseases (cont. ) 

Measles 
Mumps 

Salmonellosis 
Scarlet Fever 
Strep Throat 
Syphilis 
Tuberculosis 
Whooping Cough 

Permits fe Licenses Issued 

Septic Tanks 

Milk 

Carrying Offal 

Day Care Services for Children 

Mfg. Frozen Desserts and/or Ice Cream Mix 

Oleo 

Camps 

Piggeries 

Massage 

Motel 

Pasteur izat ion 

Food Service Establishment 

Swimming Pool 

Disposal Works Installers 

Disposal Works Installations & Repairs 

Horse Stabling 

Burial 

Non-alcoholic Beverages 

Funeral Directors 

Gas 

Plumbing 



1969 



1970 



1971 






1 





43 


172 


1 


7 





2 


3 


17 


8 





2 


2 


2 


1 





1 


3 


1 












70 


63 


103 


70 


62 


79 


26 


26 


32 


7 


10 


6 


6 


4 


4 


29 


29 


28 


2 


2 


2 


6 


4 


4 


5 


5 


4 


1 


1 


1 


3 


2 


2 


75 


70 


64 


55 


53 


59 


25 


22 


34 


88 


93 


103 


11 


47 


65 


79 


53 


59 








1 


6 


5 


6 


213 


190 


171 


191 


205 


182 



Money Received 



$5,270 $4,360 $4,741 



Environmental Sanitation 



Complaints Investigated 

Approval of Sewage Disposal System Installations 
Rejections of Sewage Disposal System Installations 
Check Excavation & Fill for Sewage Disposal System 

Installations 
Subdivision Plans Submitted for Approval 
Restaurant Layouts Submitted for Approval 
Horse Stable Plans Submitted for Approval 
Food Handling Establishment Inspections 
Milk, Cream and Ice Cream Samples Analyzed 
Water Samples Analyzed 
Swab Tests 

Swimming Pool Inspections 
Piggery Inspections 
Recreation Camp Inspections 
Stable Inspections 
Sanitarian's Office Consultations 
Sanitarian's Consultant Conferences 

Plumbing Inspections 
Gas Inspections 



82 


87 


147 


66 


57 


74 


13 


11 


8 


32 


4 


4 


9 


14 


2 


5 


3 


5 


2 


8 


3 


136 


126 


117 


43 


56 


50 


14 


17 


9 


119 


177 


149 


11 


8 


13 


9 


13 


9 


3 


2 


2 


- 


14 


35 


91 


124 


154 


- 


60 


78 


478 


450 


440 


334 


286 


261 



Public Health Nursing 

Field Visits 
Office Visits 



170 
439 



150 
613 



262 

577 



38 



1969 



1970 



1971 



International Vaccination Certificates Authenticated 



671 



730 



726 



Biological Products Dispensed 



# of Doses 



Diptheria & Tetanus Toxoids 

Diptheria, Tetanus & Pertussis 

Measles Vaccine 

Mumps Vaccine 

Rubella Vaccine 

Schick Outfits 

Smallpox Vaccine 

Tetanus Immune Globulin (human) (units) 

Tetanus & Diptheria Toxoids (Adults) 

Tetanus Toxoids 

Tuberculin, Old 

P.P.D. 

Typhoid Vaccine 

Polio Vaccine 

Vaccination Needles 

Immune Serum Globulin 

Tine Tests 

Throat Cultures 

T. B. Cultures 

Wassermann 

Enteric 

Gonorrhea 



1230 


903 


700 


2892 


2710 


2400 


810 


770 


900 


24 


1 


200 


1813 


500 


1170 


2 


1 


1 


1969 


2476 


1930 


2250 


4250 





1360 


880 


1570 


1340 


1360 


300 


680 


1150 


480 


500 








200 


310 


270 


3840 


4120 


3100 


1500 


2450 


1930 


992 


908 


606 


1700 


1950 


2050 


720 


672 


1608 


6 


6 


6 


924 


936 


600 


12 


12 








6 






Civil Defense 



It is with regret that we report the untimely passing of our Civil Defense 
Director, Mr. Burton B. Batcheller. His efforts in behalf of our town will be 
realized for many years to come. 

It was through his planning that the Town was able to carry on during his ill- 
ness, and at no time was the town without assistance in matters pertaining to Civil 
Defense. 

The activity within the Civil Defense groups was indeed gratifying and for the 
past year, these groups were able to compile a total of 2,000 volunteer man hours 
for the benefit of the town. 

Plans for the coming year include the starting of Phase #1 Planning of the 
Emergency Operations Center at the Safety Center which will conform to the plan now 
on file with the Federal Government. It will be necessary that the town carry on 
and complete this Planning Phase, in order that we may be in a position to take ad- 
vantage of any Federal assistance that may be forthcoming for the next year. 



Weights and Measures 



A total of 17,815 items were inspected for proper labeling, weight, count and 
volume content. 11,246 items were found to be correct, while 2,066 items were 
found to be deficient in either weight or volume. 4,503 items inspected for weight 
and volume content were found to contain an amount in excess of delared quantity. 

The Department sealed 208 weighing and measuring devices, adjusted 20, attached NOT 
SEALED labels on 3 units and found it necessary to CONDEMN one unit. 

Sealing fees for 1971 amounted to $342.20. Fees collected through December 31,1971, 
amounted to $366 „ 20 which have been paid to the Town Treasurer. 



39 



Housing Authority 



The year 1971 was a busy one for the Andover Housing Authority. One new 
member, Richard A. Savrann, was appointed for a five-year term by the Commissioner 
of the Department of Community Affairs, and Thomas P. Eldred was reelected by the 
townspeople to serve another five-year term. 

The Andover Housing Tenants' Organization was formed this year by tenants of 
the Veterans' Project. The purpose of the organization is to establish better com- 
munications between tenants and management — not only to discuss complaints and 
grievances, but also to initiate positive programs for action. A representative of 
the organization attends the regular monthly meetings of the Authority. 

The Authority has applied for funds under Chapter 694, an act providing for the 
modernization and renovation of existing public housing projects, to install a new, 
non-polluting heating system and to install showers in the Veterans' Project. 

A great deal of time and effort has been expended by the Authority this year 
searching for a suitable site on which to build a third Elderly Housing Project. 
Twelve sites were inspected by the Authority and the Department of Community Affairs. 
The Curran Estate on North Main Street was selected by the Authority and approved by 
the Department of Community Affairs for the construction of under 100 units of eld- 
erly housing. 

VETERANS PROJECT 200-1 

Four new families moved into the project this year, and one tenant family moved 
within the project. There are ten eligible veteran applicants on a waiting list. 

Yearly Income Limits for the Veterans' Project were increased this year. The 
revised Admission Limits are: for families with 2 or less minor dependents, $6,500; 
for families with 3 or more minor dependents, $7,500. The revised Continued Occu- 
pancy Limits are: for families with 2 or less minor dependents, $7,500; for families 
with 3 or more minor dependents, $8,500. The average monthly rental, including util- 
ities, is $85.42. 

Development cost for this project was $626,000, financed with Housing Authority 
Bonds @ 2 1/8% interest, of which $218,000 has been retired. This project will be- 
come the property of the Town when paid for in 1992. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses for the Veterans' 
Project for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1971. 

Income 



Rents, Utility Charges and Interest 

State Aid 

Reduction from Prior Year's Surplus 

Expense 

Management Expense 

Utilities 

Repairs, Maintenance & Replacements 

Insurance 

Contribution to Pension Fund 

Payment in Lieu of Taxes 

Reserves 

Debt Service 

Surplus 

ELDERLY HOUSING PROJECT 667-C 

This is a consolidated project of 80 units, 40 units located at Chestnut Court 

40 



$61,287.42 








12,650.00 








3,000.00 


$76 : 


937 


42 


$ 8,453.12 








17,210.94 








11,140.51 








1,679.36 








851.00 








2,016.00 








4,704.00 








23,620.70 


69, 


675 


.63 




$ 7, 


,261 


.79 



(Project 667-1) and 40 units at Grandview Terrace (Project 667-2.) 

Yearly income limits for Elderly Housing were increased this year. Revised Ad- 
mission Limits are: for one person, 65 years of age or older, $3,500; for two per- 
sons, 65 years of age or older, $4,000. Revised Continued Occupancy Limits are: 
for one person, 65 years of age or older, $4,000; for two persons, 65 years of age 
or older, $4,500. The average monthly rental, including utilities, was $46.73. Un- 
der Chapter 853 of the General Laws, elderly persons residing in State-Aided public 
housing pay no more than 25% of total income for rent. 

Development costs for the projects were $1,155,000, financed by Housing Author- 
ity Notes, of which $114,000 has been retired. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses for Elderly Housing 
Project 667-C for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1971: 



Income 



Rents & Interest 
State Aid 



Expense 



Management Expense 

Utilities 

Repairs, Maintenance & Replacements 

Insurance 

Pension Fund 

Accruals 

Debt Service Requirements 



$48,575.13 
46,200,00 



$ 5,993.24 

12,827.94 

6,211.22 

1,593.00 

546.00 

7,667.00 

63,700.00 



$94,775.13 



Deficit 



98,538.40 
$ 3,763.27 



Building Inspection 



The purpose and scope of the Andover Building Code is to provide for safety, 
health, and public welfare through structural strength and stability, adequate 
egress, proper light and ventilation, and protection of life and property from fire 
hazards incident to design. 

Enforcement of the Town Building Code is the responsibility of the Building 
Inspector. He is also the enforcing officer for the Town Zoning By-Laws with his 
rulings subject to the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

All Board of Appeals applications are reviewed and processed through this of- 
fice and, in addition, copies of its definitive action on all petitions are kept 
for the convenience of the general public. 

Electrical Permits are also issued by this department with the approval of the 
Electrical Inspector. Related records, fees and reports are also maintained by this 
office for all three departments. 

Three gravel pits were carefully supervised, and detailed reports were filed 
with the Board of Selectmen. 



At the request of the Board of Selectmen, as required in the By-Laws, all es- 
tablishments for license issuance were investigated, and reports were filed with 
the Town Manager . 

An overall survey for junk car violations was carried out by this office at 
the direction of the Town Manager in the early spring with a follow-up in November 

New rules and regulations were enacted and approved for greater safety of 

41 



swimming pools. This action was done at the October Special Town Meeting. 

Numerous building and zoning violations were investigated and corrected with- 
out incident. The Building Inspector attended several courses of advanced educa- 
tion sponsored by the Commonwealth and building inspectors' organizations. 

A total of 464 Building Permits were issued during the year 1971 

Following is a tabulation of the Building Permits issued for the years 1967 
through 1971: 

TYPE ESTIMATED VALUATION PERMIT FEES 

j.967 

144 Dwellings & Garages $ 3,299,350.00 

10 Other Buildings 6,472,850.00 

273 Additions & Alterations 666,249.00 

85 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 128,055.00 

512 $10,566,504.00 $28,903.00 

1968 

148 Dwellings & Garages $ 3,748,028.00 

27 Other Buildings 5,768,530.00 
251 Additions & Alterations 802,590.00 

87 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 295,425.00 

513 $10,614,573.00 $24,372.00 
13 Soil Removals 39.00 

1969 $24,411.00 
131 Dwellings & Garages $ 3,509,700.00 

28 Other Buildings 11,833,200.00 
200 Additions & Alterations 471,655.00 
107 Others (ra e, sign, swimming 

pools, etc.) 129,159.00 

466 $15,943,714.00 $45,831.00 

1 Soil Removal 12.00 

1970 $45,843.00 

85 Dwellings & Garages $ 2,370,500.00 

6 Other Buildings 949,500.00 

224 Additions & Alterations 947,575.00 

97 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 200,175.00 

412 $ 4,467,750.00 $13,205.00 

3 Soil Removals 39.00 

1971 $13,244.00 

114 Dwellings & Garages $ 2,882,194.00 

45 Other Buildings 5,513,249.00 

229 Additions & Alterations 4,150,940.00 

76 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 166,370.00 

464 $12,712,753.00 $23,253.00 



42 



Memorial Hall Library 



Memorial Hall Library is fortunate in possessing a long and proud tradition for 
public service to both the residents of Andover and members of other communities in 
the Commonwealth. During 1971, the Library continued its progress in the areas of 
atmosphere, programming, collection building, accessibility of information, and 
adaptability, striving to merit the high regard in which public libraries have been 
held since their development in this country. Firm belief in the fact that a good 
reputation must be earned constantly lends impetus to our endeavor and, hopefully, 
results in the kind of library desired by the citizens of Andover. 

This fall, through the generosity of three Andoverites, Memorial Hall was able 
to publish and distribute an illustrated brochure explaining library services and 
goals. To the newcomer in town, the booklet serves as a valuable introduction to a 
basic town facility; to the long time resident, it is a pleasant reminder of the 
constant activity and innovating interest present in an agency overlooked in far too 
many towns . 

Happily, the innovations made at Memorial Hall during 1971 rendered "over- 
looking" impossible. While the installation of carpeting in the main circulation 
desk area cut down on noise disturbance, the homey crackle of a fire in the fire- 
place set a friendly air about the place. Attractive displays were a pleasant sur- 
prise in many parts of the building, and heavily-used areas were treated to a fresh 
coat of paint, once again rejuvenating the near-century-old structure. Use of the 
public catalog was facilitated by the addition of a new catalog table and rearrange- 
ment of the file itself, and followers of the Best Seller List were happy to find 
enlarged new book shelves just inside the main entrance. 

Weaving, carving, painting, design, and music were but a few of the arts lend- 
ing flavor and variety to special programs at Memorial Hall during 1971. The May 
Festival of the Arts brought talented members of the community to the library to 
display, and in some cases teach, their skills. Visitors in November might have 
happened upon the excitement of a fashion show one morning; and while many homes 
glowed with the products of a Christmas decoration workshop, over seventy-five pa- 
trons were entertained by a string ensemble that presented a holiday music program 
for senior citizens. 

Month-long "one-man shows" by local artists became a regular feature in the 
library through the cooperation of the Andover Artists' Guild, and, also with Guild 
cooperation, the first of many paintings by local artists were added to the circu- 
lating art collection. Sculpture was another addition to the art collection and it 
has proved to be a popular commodity. 

Surely one area in which the library can stand proudly is that of service to 
unemployed professionals. Having been the successful catalyst for the group known 
as "New Horizons," Memorial Hall continues to offer workshops and bibliographic and 
instrumental materials to those being most challenged by the current economic crisis. 

Service to special groups has become a tradition at Memorial Hall, and the year 
1971 saw a broadened variety of materials being used to supply the visually handi- 
capped, the aged, and the housebound. Large type books were expanded in both number 
and scope, and talking books, books in Braille, and Newsweek Magazine on tape were 
added to the home delivery service. A monthly film program for the aged was inau- 
gurated, and nursing homes in the Andover area continued to be supplied with book 
materials . 

"Paperback" became the byword of the book collection in 1971, with the first 
purchase of the handy volumes in Memorial Hall's history. Patrons of all ages were 
enthusiastic in their response. Technological advancements in information storage 
and retrieval led to the expansion of the audio-visual department, with the purchase 
of cassettes, 16mm films, and microfilms, as well as the addition of 8mm films and 
an 8mm projector for patron use. Sherman Pridham, a new fulltime staff member, will 
have charge of both the audio-visual equipment and young adult services. 

43 



Regional service to the twenty-five Essex County libraries for whom Memorial 
Hall is the sub-regional center continues to flourish, and with the addition of 
Miss Jan Baranowski as a full-time librarian in charge of Regional activities, fur- 
ther increase is expected. The opening of a new addition to its present structure 
will render the Boston Public Library a more valuable member of the Regional system 
as well — an improvement that will be felt in Andover with the beginning of a di- 
rect delivery service between member libraries. It is anticipated that the delivery 
should begin by spring of 1972. In effect, then, delays in receiving Interlibrary 
Loan Request materials from Boston will be narrowed to two or three days, and small 
libraries will be able to rely on the vast historical resources of Boston while con- 
centrating on current materials for their own collections. 

As a subregional center, Andover receives increased state funds each year to 
build and expand programs aimed at our larger patronage in Essex County. During 
1971, librarians from other libraries have been invited to Memorial Hall to partic- 
ipate in workshops on budgeting, audio-visual materials, developing programs, and 
reaching the disadvantaged. In addition, a circulating exhibit explaining the va- 
riety of services available on a regional basis was prepared and will be lent to 
libraries in our sub-region, thus fulfilling our responsibility to acquaint the gen- 
eral public with these services. 

The growth of the Children's Department staff to include Miss Mary Lynch as 
Children's Librarian launched the department on a new era of programs and services. 
Summer turned into a whirlwind of activities including reading clubs, music appre- 
ciation, pre-schoolers' story hours, a crafts class (conducted by Mrs. Frances 
McCormick of the Andover Artists' Guild), a festival of full-length films, a pro- 
gram of activities for rainy days, and the initiation of VIBOR, a fantastically en- 
thusiastic group of fourth, fifth, and sixth graders who became involved in the ac- 
tual selection of materials for the Children's Room. A new emphasis on public re- 
lations and display made "Come Together at Your Summer Library," "Notes on Notes," 
"The Crafts Class," "The Roly-Poly Set," "The Rainy Day Program," "The Film Festi- 
val," and "VIBOR (The Very Important Board of Review)" household words to not only 
the three hundred children participating but to anyone who wandered through the 
Children's Room as well. 

Fall saw the unusual continuance of a summer activity during the school year 
with VIBOR becoming a permanent Children's Department fixture at the demand of its 
members. The children's book selection activities have since extended to trips to 
book jobbers, and visits from publishers' representatives are planned. Also afoot 
is the extension of VIBOR to the Young-Adult area when half its members reach the 
new transferral age (seventh grade) next year. 

While VIBOR flourished, new fall programs began. Pre-schoolers seeking member- 
ship in Littlest Listeners, the oldest continuing program at the library, reached 
record numbers during 1971, with all four groups filled well in advance of the open- 
ing session. Pre-schoolers not in Littlest Listeners were treated to six "PJ Party" 
story and game periods — programs which they attended in pajamas! The "Story Cara- 
van" presented story hours and films on alternate Thursdays, with the highlight of a 
guest, Ed Emberley, during National Children's Book Week in November. Mr. Ember ley 
was awarded the 1968 Caldecott Medal for the most outstanding illustrations for a 
children's book for his Drummer Hoff , which also served as the keynote for Childrens 
Room decorations during the month. In addition, "Imagine/Enigami , " a poetry -writing/ 
art film group, met five times, resulting in the informal publication of a book of 
poems by Memorial Hall children. 

Carpeting and unique "cube chairs" added to the physical comforts of the Child- 
ren's Room during 1971, and newly-bound and subject-boxed articles from National 
Geographic , Chrystal Climbers, puzzles, games, and talking books enhanced the col- 
lection . An aquarium and a bird feeder are soon to be purchased. 

The difficult problem of cooperation with the schools, hampered by time and 
difference of interests, has been somewhat alleviated; and nursery schools from the 
area have had individual story hours and tours of the library. To the traditional 
help with Scout badgework was added a popular Christmas Tree decoration contest, and 
several students of children's literature at local colleges complimented the 

44 



Children's Room by frequently using it as a model in their projects. 



In retrospect, 1971 was a successful year for Memorial Hall Library, tarnished 
only by the growing fear that needs for additional staff, stack space, and equipment 
could be neglected until advances in society have progressed too far beyond our cap- 
acities for the library to maintain its current position of respected excellence. 
The celerity of technological improvements resulting in a greater number of more 
complicated demands for information, the medical strides being taken to supply us 
with a longer lifespan with more leisure time for self-improvement, the interest in 
and varieties of artistic endeavor that flood volumes of literature and multiple 
media — all find a rightful place in the libraries that are vital in our exciting 
lives and times. It is the library that is willing to plan for the future in terms 
of expense and development that will have a role in planning that future, and it is 
the community willing to support such imagination that will most richly benefit. 
Hopefully, that library is Memorial Hall; certainly, that community will be Andover. 



71 


,996 


24 


,000 


5 


,794 


1 ; 


,600 




938 




450 


36 


,090 


86 . 


,550 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 

Adult 
1970 1971 

REGISTRATION OF BORROWERS (1) 3,191 2,711 

BOOK STOCK AND USE 

Vols, at end of reporting year 75,000 

Vols, added 10,450 

Vols, withdrawn 1,587 

Vols, circulated 193,323 

(incl. periodicals & pamphlets) 

PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS 

Subscriptions 

Gifts 
AUDIO-VISUAL 



Framed Reproductions 

Records 

Slides, filmstrips 

Microfilm (reels) 

Films (reels) 
GRAND TOTAL CIRCULATION: 296,215 (2) 
INTERLIBRARY LOAN 

Books borrowed from other libraries 

Books loaned to other libraries 

ACTIVITY GROUPS 

Adult Programs 
Story Hours 



Juvenile 
1971 1970 



Total 
1971 1970 



4,000 



794 7,191 



3,505 



21,435 99,000 93,431 

881 12,050 6,675 

543 2,037 1,481 

74,491 279,873 210,581 



415 




299 


29 




15 


444 314 


54 




42 


— 




— 


54 42 


Owned at end 


of 




Added 




Circulated 


reporting year 




during 


year 


during year 


228 






74 






668 


3,600 






1,155 






14,158 


310 






6 






430 


2,887 






307 









118 






103 






1,086 



1971 

216 

2,633 

1971 

25 
15 



1970 

293 

1,480 

1970 

24 



45 



ACTIVITY GROUPS (cont . ) 

Pre-school Programs 

School Class Visits 

Other Juvenile Programs (Art, Music, 
Poetry, Crafts, etc.) 



1971 
86 
16 

75 



1970 
63 
14 



PERSONNEL 1971 

Total Budget 

Personal Services 

Personnel as percent of 
Total Budget 

Full-time Personnel 

Part-time Personnel 

Total Personnel 

PER CAPITA (based on 1970 census, 23,695 population) 



1970 



$266,767 


$246,000 


185,187 


160,000 


67% 


65% 


20 


16 


42 


34 


62 


50 



BOOK STOCK 



CIRCULATION OF BOOKS 



1971 



4.1 



12.33 



1970 



4.5 



10.24 



(1) Active Registered Borrowers total 15,041. This registration figure represents 
a true registered borrowers' figure since our re-registration of cards issued 
for a three-year period has been completed as of June, 1971. 

(2) Statistics for the library's Ballardvale Branch are included in the general 
figures. The branch is open 10 hours per week, has an estimated total book 
stock of 5,000. In 1971 the total circulation of 8,162 included 3,856 Adult 
and 4,306 Juvenile. 



Animal Inspection 

Number of Cattle Inspected: 

Registered. . . . „ . . . 

Grade. . . . „ . . . 90 

Number of Sheep Inspected . .... 1 

Number of Horses Inspected. 103 

Number of Ponies Inspected.... 26 

Number of Goats Inspected 3 

Number of Swine Inspected. ...... 1 ,740 

Number of Barns (Dairy) 

Inspected 3 

Number of Dogs Quarantined. 80 

Number of Dogs with Rabies......... 



46 



Parks 



The Park Division during the early Spring made repairs and painted all the 
backstops on all the baseball diamonds both on regular and little League Fields. 
Eight Little League and three regular fields were raked, rolled and marked for 
each game for the schools and Little teams. This division prepares the tracks 
for all meets. Fertilizer was applied in Spring and Fall on both the Park and 
playstead areas and all playfields were seeded. 

This Division added duties involving the care of maintenance of some 26 grass 
plot areas within the town. 

The Park Division removes rubbish at least three times each week from all the 
containers in the street around the town, the Town Hall, Safety Center, Recreation 
Park, Shawsheen Square, Town Yard, Burnham Road, and the playgrounds throughout 
the summer . 

The Park men return to the Highway Division for the winter months. 



Forestry 



A diversified tree planting program was continued during the past year with 
170 young trees being set out and maintained. Several species of shade and orna- 
mental trees were planted including several varieties of maples, lindens, syca- 
mores, disease resistant elms, pines, flowering crabapples , cherries and plums. 
All newly planted trees were fertilized, mulched and watered during the growing 
season. 

The shade tree spray program designed to protect trees from insects and 
diseases was carried out using State and Federal approved pesticides and applica- 
tion methods. Spraying was done to control infestations of elm bark beetles, elm 
leaf beetles, willow leaf beetles, aphids, oak skeletonizers and webworms . The 
damage by oak skeletonizers which had caused severe defoliation for the past three 
years was less in 1971 due to natural controls and use of new pesticides. 

Dutch Elm disease was found to have infected 30 trees this year. These in- 
fected trees were cut down and disposed of at the landfill site. Joint effort of 
the Massachusetts Electric Company, the New England Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany and the Andover Forestry Department effected the removal of approximately 
20 dangerous trees over utility wires. Massachusetts Department of Natural Re- 
sources personnel assisted in locating sampling and removing a number of diseased 
trees. 

Routine tree maintenance work included low limb removal, dangerous tree re- 
moval, bark tracing damaged trunk areas, cabling weak trees, watering and fer- 
tilizing young trees. Supervision and inspection of wire clearing work was con- 
tinued and new underground and aerial construction gone over in detail with util- 
ity engineers and arborists. Yearly control of poison ivy and roadside brush by 
herbicide spraying was done along roads and at recreation areas. Roadside mowing 
of grass and weeds was performed by contract work during the summer. This project 
includes all town roads and public areas which require high grass cutting by a 
tractor mounted mower . 

During 1971 a total of 43 trees were topped by contract work. Continued air 
and ground pollution is causing the decline and death of large numbers of roadside 
trees. Approximately 70 sugar maples died and were removed during the year. 
Several factors which have damaging effects on plant and tree growth include in- 
sects and diseases, lack of moisture, hottop close to tree trunks, root cutting, 
gas leaks, and atmosphere pollution. 

Forestry Department personnel worked during snowstorms operating trucks and 
sidewalk plows. 



47 



Engineering 



Construction plans and specifications were prepared, bids were taken and the 
field layout and on site imspection were provided for the following list of pro- 
jects. 
SANITARY SEWERS: 

The installation of approximately 1800 feet of 10 inch sanitary sewer in 
Central Street and Lupine Road was completed. 
STORM DRAINS: 

1. The following storm drainage is under contract. 
840 lineal feet of 18" drain in Chandler Road 
120 lineal feet of 12" drain in Foster Circle 
340 lineal feet of 12" drain in Russett Lane 
575 lineal feet of 12" drain in Moraine 

680 lineal feet of 12" , 15" and 18" drain Holt Road 

480 lineal feet of 12" drain in Cross Street 

370 lineal feet of 12" drain in Greenwood Road installed by the Highway 

Division. 

2. Storm drainage from Shawsheen Heights to Hussey's Brook across the land of 
Grieco was bid in October. (2100 lineal feet of 12", 15", 18" and 24") 

It became necessary to reject all bids received and the work will be rebid 

in the Spring. 
SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION: 

1440 lineal feet on Ballardvale Road 

600 lineal feet on Chandler Road 

The paving of 1500 lineal feet on North Main Street on a base constructed 

under a State Contract. 

The completion of 700 lineal feet on Holt Road started in 1970. 
RECREATION: 

The construction of a concrete slab for a multi-purpose play area at 
Recreation Park 80 feet by 175 feet was completed. 
PARKING AREAS: 

1. A paved parking area at the West Andover Community Center. 

2. The parking area at the rear of the Town Hall was paved and lines were 
laid out. 

PLANNING BOARD: 

Definitive plans for 3 new subdivisions of land totaling 133 lots were re- 
viewed for the Planning Board to determine conformance with its rules and regula- 
tions and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. New roadway con- 
struction this past year was limited to three subdivisions which reduced the amount 
of inspection time. 
MISCELLANEOUS: 

1. Easement and betterment plans were prepared where applicable for the con- 
struction projects outlined above. 

2. The Town was represented in all engineering matters with the County and 
State governments, principally concerning the reconstruction of Andover 
Street and the coming widening of the bridge over the Merrimack 
(Route 93). 

3. Many plans, drawings and sketches were prepared for the Selectmen, Town 
Manager and the various Town Departments and Boards. 

4. Many Town citizens were assisted in obtaining information about existing 
Town utilities, street layouts and other general information. 

5. This Division assisted in providing Street opening permits for under- 
ground utilities. 

6. The engineering records of the Town were maintained and other Town depart- 
ments were aided in obtaining such information. 

The Engineering Division consists of two full-time employees with two 
students employed during the summer months. 



48 



Highways 



RESURFACING: 

During the year 1971, some 20 miles of roads were treated with MC3-Asphalt 
and sand as well as being honed. The following streets were resurfaced by the 
above method: Cuba Street, Appletree Lane, Beech Circle, Brundrette Lane, Cornell 
Road, Jenkins Road, High Plain Rd. (upper end), Lockway Road, Mary Lou Lane, 
Pleasant Street, River Street, Sherbourne Street, Upland Road, West Knoll Road, 
Hall Avenue, Arthur Road, Chestnut Court, Gray Road, Henderson Avenue, Johnson 
Road, Marilyn Road, Osgood Street, School Street, Shipman Road, Stratford Road, 
Vine Street, Westwind Road, Andover Street, Boutwell Road, Brown Street, Corbett 
Street, Dartmouth Road, Highland Road, Laurel Lane, Marion Avenue, Phillips St., 
Spring Grove, Stevens Circle, Theodore Avenue, Virginia Road, Arcadia Road, 
Buxton Court, Carlisle Street, Center Street, Dumbarton Street, Dwight Street, 
Foster Circle, Iceland Road, Lucerne Drive, Lupine Road, Maple Avenue, Marland 
Street, Pleasant Street, River Street, Stirling Street, Sutherland Street, High 
Plain Road (Turner Circle to Greenwood) Summer Street, Holt Road, William Street, 
Pine Street, Carmel Road, Prospect Hill Road (Water tank extension) Lincoln Circle, 
Shirley Road, Greenwood Road. A total of 70,000 gallons was used in 1971. 

The following streets were resurfaced with a layer of Type I Bituminous Con- 
crete: Lowell Street from Rutgers Road to Haggetts Pond Road, a distance of 
4,700 feet, the entire length of Railroad Avenue and Maple Avenue. A Parking Area 
was built in the rear of the Town Hall. 
CLEAN UP: 

During the Spring and Summer two sweepers are kept busy cleaning the streets 
after the winter sanding. This past fall we had two leaf pickers removing leaves 
from the town streets. Sweepings from the streets were taken to the Landfill for 
use as cover material and the leaves were taken to the Essex Gravel Pit for com- 
posting. 
INSPECTION: 

The Highway Division works with the Engineering Division on its inspection 
of the conditions of streets before they are accepted as public ways by the Board 
of Selectmen. The Highway Division also provides men and equipment for all other 
divisions when needed. 
BRIDGES: 

Bridges under control of the Highway Division e.g. Stevens Street, Andover 
Street and Central Street were inspected during the year. Minor repairs were made 
to the Central Street Bridge and to the Stevens Street Bridge, this past year. 
SIDEWALKS: 

Sidewalks were constructed of type D-13 Bituminous Concrete; about 500 feet of 
sidewalk was built on the upper end of Summer Street, also a section was built on 
Morton Street. A cement sidewalk was constructed at the intersection of Lowell 
and Poor Street in Shawsheen Village. 
STORM DRAINS: 

A storm drain (370 lineal feet of 12" cement pipe) and four new catch basins 
were built. This was installed in Greenwood Road. 

Existing catch basins and storm drains were cleaned and repaired. 
SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 

This Division was in charge of snow removal and sanding. The snowfall for 
the years of 1970-1971 was as follows : 

November 10.90 inches 
December 16.75 " 



January 
February 
March 
April 



Total 1971 



12.25 
8.50 
1.50 
7.00 " 

56 . 90 inches 



49 



Water Department 



MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS: 

1„ New pumps and motors were installed at the Bancroft Booster Pumping 

Station. 
2. Construction began on the new Water Treatment Plant at Haggetts Pond 

in May. 

WATER CONSUMPTION: 

1971 was another year for record consumption. The total water pumped to the 
system was 1,142,750,000 gallons. The average daily pumping was 3.13 million 
gallons and the maximum day was 5.44 million gallons on July 9. 
ADDITIONS TO THE WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM: 

8-inch pipe - 3,045 lineal feet 

6-inch pipe 320 lineal feet 

8-inch gaite valves - 7 

6-inch gate valves - 8 

Hydrants - 7 

WATER SERVICES: 

New Main Connections - 5 
Connections for Water Services - 87 

WATER METERS: 

New meters installed with outside readers 41 

New meters installed without outside readers 240 

Total New Meters Installed 281 

New Meters replaced due to defects 29 

Old Meters removed, repaired & reinstalled 65 

Old meters repaired on site 197 

Field meters serviced (Spring & Fall) 20 

MAINTENANCE: 

1 . Repaired water main breaks 24 
Repaired service line breaks 47 
Service lines renewed to property line 37 
Replaced Hydrants 15 
Repaired Hydrants 39 
Service calls 1,314 

2. Completely flushed the west high service distribution system to alleviate 
rusty or dirty water. 

3. Maintained general maintenance program of painting and marking of 
hydrants, testing of gate valves, resetting gate boxes for road resur- 
facing programs, maintained building, grounds and equipment and collected 
water samples for testing by the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health. 

(A financial report of the water system is found on Page 138.) 



Spring Grove Cemetery 



Spring Grove Cemetery is located in the southwesterly part of the town, with 
the principal entrance at the junction of Abbot Street and Spring Grove Road. 

The cemetery contains about 60 acres of land, of which 14 acres are undevel- 
oped. It has been planned and developed to keep its natural beauty. Lots are 
available to meet all requirements. 

Routine work consists of cutting grass, trimming around the monuments, raking 
and cleaning up of the grounds, cutting of brush, pruning of trees and shrubs, 
preparing of new gravesites, filling in sunken graves, grading and seeding of 
winter graves, applying lime and fertilizers, keeping roads cleared of snow, 
pouring of cement for foundations and interments. 

The cemetery is open year round. Cemetery Division personnel work during 
all snow storms operating trucks and plows for the Highway Division. 

50 



During the year 37 new Lots were sold and we had 99 interments. From the 
perpetual care payments on these lot sales and from a payment by one lot holder 
placing his older lot under perpetual care a total of $4500.00 was added to the 
Perpetual Care Fund. This fund now totals $190,642.27. 

A total of $8432.70 was received from the sales of new lots, interments, 
vaults sales, foundation charges, lots under annual care, and for the sale of 
flower rings. These general receipts and the income from Perpetual Care Fund 
was turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Major improvements at the Cemetery were as follows: 

1. A fertilizer and lime program 

2. Herbicide program to remove weeds from the roads and curbing 

3. Maintenance of trees and shrubs, assisted by the Tree Division 

4. Irrigation program 

5. Clearing of Brush 

Major purchases for the cemetery were as follows: 

1 . 1971 \ ton Pick-up truck 

2. Tractor w/front end scoop, 12 foot backhoe and a fully enclosed cab. 



Sewers 



Major improvements to the sanitary sewer system: 

1800 lineal feet of sewer in Central Street and Lupine Road 

MAINTENANCE : 

Sewer Main Blocks cleared - 87 

Sewer house service blocks cleared - 104 

General operating program maintained daily at the Ballardvale Treatment 
Plant and the Riverina Road Pumping Station along with a preventitive sewer 
main rodding program. Sewer manholes were raised for all road resurfacing pro- 
grams and the highway division was assisted in cleaning of storm drains. 



Landfill 



The 1971 budget was $65,036 of which $26,036 was for personnel services and 
$20,000 was for cover material. In addition to the budget items, the following 
special articles were approved at the March Town Meeting: 

1. $34,000 for additional operational funds ($27,000 of which h a s been used to 
purchase daily cover material) . 

2. $40,000 in funds to reduce the pollution problems at our present landfill 
site. 

3. $45,000 in funds for the evaluation of new landfill sites and to provide 
engineering and geological data. 

4. $3,000 as the Town's share in becoming a member of the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Solid Waste Disposal Planning Board. 

The Town is well aware of the problems in operating the present landfill 
site and is making plans for obtaining a new site. The funds allocated for daily 
cover material have increased as follows : 

1970 - $19,936 

1971 - $47,000 

These figures indicate that we have increased our appropriation for daily 
cover material in 1971 by over 100 per cent and are proposing an increase of 
over 260 per cent for 1972. 



51 



The present 25 acre site has been used for the disposal of solid waste 
since shortly after World War II. The seriousness of the present pollution 
problem was not fully comprehended until the latter part of 1970 when all 
disposal of chemicals ceased. 

The following projects have been completed or started during 1971: 

1. An attempt to remove the existing buried chemicals was made in order to 
reduce further pollution to the ground and surface water. 

2. A topographic survey was completed at our present site. 

3. Field surveys to determine property lines and for the design of an under- 
ground collection system to lower the ground water at the present site was 
completed. 

4. Test pit excavations to determine soil conditions, water table and the 
elevation of ledge was completed. Pipes have been installed in some of the 
above test pits and the monitoring of the water table is continuing. 

5. Final work on the design and detailed construction drawings and specifications 
have been started for a sub-drain system in order to eliminate the pollution 
problems at our present site. We plan to receive construction bids by March 
of 1972 and begin the construction as soon as weather conditions permit. 

6. A survey of the volume of industrial and commercial waste was completed and 
the survey indicates that we received approximately 600 cu.yds. of solid 
waste from these sources daily. 

7. A draft of new Town regulations has been started. 

8. In order to consolidate our disposal area and provide better control of 
compacting and covering our waste, a new oil and gravel road was constructed 
during 1971 at a cost of $2,600. 

9. In order to provide additional cover material in 1971, we hauled extra cover 
material from other town owned land by town forces. This is in addition to 
the cover material purchased for $47,000. 

10. We have met with personnel from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health 
from time to time during 1971 to review our progress and our future plans. 

11. We have had several meetings with the local industries in order to determine 
what can be done to reduce the volume of solid waste that is generated within 
the Town. As a result of these meetings, one of the largest industrial firms 
in the town has completed its own study by a private sanitary engineering 
consultant. 

12. In January of 1971, a local committee completed a year of study of new sites 
for a sanitary landfill in Andover. During the Spring of 1971, another pos- 
sible site was brought to our attention and we have reviewed this site along 
with the one recommended by the Study Committee with other Town Boards and 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 

13. In August of 1971, we entered into a contract with Metcalf & Eddy, Consulting 
Engineers, at a cost of $17,500. for their evaluation of the two proposed 
sites and the preparation of final plans for approval of the final site selec- 
ted. To date, the engineers have submitted to the Town a draft of its site 
evaluation. We have requested further data from the engineers and expect to 
receive the final report soon. 

14. We are entering into a contract with a firm to provide us with a topographic 
plan of the two proposed sites. 

15. We have met with many firms in the solid waste field in order to evaluate 
other methods of solid waste disposal (pulverizing, compaction, baling, 
capsulation, incineration and recycling). 

16. The Regional Solid Waste Disposal Planning Board has met with the Massachu- 
setts Department of Public Works throughout the year and it appears that they 
have finally convinced the Department to complete a detailed regional study. 
The Department of Public Works has had to wait until December of 1971 to re- 
ceive the preliminary draft of a state-wide study. We feel that Andover can- 
not finalize its plans until we obtain detailed knowledge and costs of possi- 
ble regional solutions to our solid waste problem. 

17. We entered into a contract with a large log chipping firm in order to elimi- 
nate the need for adding these logs to our landfill. After an expenditure of 
over $3,000., it became apparent that this method of operation was uneconom- 
ical. 



52 



18. Brush removed along town roads is being taken to an abandoned gravel pit 
and converted to wood chips by town forces to save needed space at our pre- 
sent site. Other large private contributors of brush have been notified 
that such material will not be accepted at our landfill. 

19. Private citizens of the town have set up and are operating, successfully, 
paper and glass collections and recycling programs. 

We feel that the above indicates that we are very well informed as to our 
present problems and have made progress in solving these problems. Also, our 
immediate plans are adequate to eliminate these problems. 



G. L. R. R. D. P. B. 



At the March Town Meeting the townspeople voted to become an official member 
of the Greater Lawrence Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board. Three members 
were appointed by the Moderator. We have been meeting at least once monthly with 
the Towns of North Andover and Methuen and the City of Lawrence. Other munici- 
palities have been invited to attend all of our meetings in an attempt to esta- 
blish as large a region as possible. 

The Board has met with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works, (Divi- 
sion of Solid Waste) , throughout the year and it appears that we have finally 
convinced the Department to find a detailed regional solid waste study for our 
area. This Department has had to wait until they received a preliminary draft of 
a state-wide study being done for them by private consultants. 

The Refuse Planning Board feels that it will be able to make specific re- 
commendations to the member communities on the possibility of a regional solid 
waste disposal facility once the detailed study has been completed. 



G. L. S. D. C. 



The District has been meeting at least monthly during the year and reviewing 
the progress of the detailed construction plans and specifications for the Waste- 
water Treatment Facilities for the Greater Lawrence Area (Andover, North Andover, 
Methuen and Lawrence). 

The construction of this project will be divided into the following: 
Contract No. 1 - Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Contract No. 2 - Pumping Station 
Contract No. 3 - Intercepting Sewers 
Contract No. 4 - Intercepting Sewers 
Contract No. 5 - Wastewater Meter Stations 
Progress on these various projects are as follows: 

1. Included under Contract No. 1 are the Administration Building, Plant Water 
Pumping Station, Activated Sludge Pumping Station, Main Electrical Distribution 
Building, Flotation Building and the Process and Maintenance Building. All 
parts of this contract are now in the final review stage by the Consulting 
Engineers. 

2. Final review and corrections are in progress for the Pumping Stations. 

3. Design, cross checking and coordination of designs and plans is continuing for 
the Intercepting Sewers. (Contracts No. 3 & 4) 

4. The plans and specifications for the Wastewater Meter Stations are substantial- 
ly complete except for instrumentation and electrical sections. 

5. All field surveys have been completed. 

6. Boring reports and logs in connection with the subsurface explorations are 
being evaluated by the soil consultants. 

7. Easement drawings are being prepared. 

Meetings have been held throughout the year with the Corps of Engineers, 
Bureau of Air Use Management. Massachusetts Division of Water Pollution Control 
and the Environmental Protection Agency to insure that the final plans and speci- 
fications meet all the State and Federal requirements. 

53 



The plans and specifications will be completed and submitted to the Massa- 
chusetts Division of Water Pollution Control for final approval by March 15, 1972. 

The updated cost estimates for the facilities now under final design are con- 
siderably higher than costs which were foreseen when the district facilities were 
proposed in 1965. The total estimated cost for these facilities is now $67,000,000 
of which the State and Federal Aid will amount to $53,000,000 with the remainder 
to be the District's costs ($14,000,000). The Town's share of this will be approx- 
imately $1,120,000 that can be financed over a 30 year period if desired. The 
above costs can only be compared to the Town's cost of building its own facility 
which is estimated to be $7,900,000. 

The estimated first full year operating and maintenance cost of the regional 
facility is $1,043,000 of which it is estimated that the Town's share will be 
$94,000. The estimated first year operating and maintenance cost for a plant for 
Andover alone is $172,000. 

A color slide presentation is available that explains the history of the 
Sanitary District, the proposed Wastewater Treatment Facilities and costs for any 
interested groups. 

Merrimack Valley Planning Commission 

In recognition of the fact that its membership had grown to include most of the 
communities in the Merrimack Valley, not just the central four Greater Lawrence com- 
munities, the Commission began its second decade of existence by changing its name 
from Central Merrimack Valley Regional Planning District Commission to Merrimack 
Valley Planning Commission. The agency is a voluntary association of cities and 
towns in northern Essex County organized under Chapter 40B of the General Statutes. 
It is officially recognized by the State and Federal governments as the regional 
planning agency for the cities of Haverhill, Lawrence, and Newburyport , and the 
towns of Amesbury , Andover, Boxford, Georgetown, Groveland, Merrimac, Methuen, New- 
bury, North Andover, Rowley, Salisbury, and West Newbury. The Commission is charged 
by State Law and Federal Regulations with guiding development activities within the 
region and coordinating the expenditure of State and Federal grant monies for social 
and physical improvement programs. 

The Commission met eleven times during the year with an average total attend- 
ance of 66%. Individual community representation varied from a low of 27% for 
Amesbury and Methuen to 100% for Groveland, North Andover, and Salisbury. 

The Commission was fortunate to be able to retain its staff of four full-time 
employees for the year, unlike many of the other regions in the state. The staff 
gives the region a total of 36 years of planning experience gained from serving 
different communities. 

In addition to providing advice and technical information, the staff acts as 
the eyes and ears of the Commission and the member communities. In this capacity 
the staff attended a total of 195 meetings during the year. This is the equivalent 
of 2,925 appearances by local officials. 

Activities in 1971 

The Commission was active in nine separately identifiable fields during the 
year. Most of these activities were continuations of past programs, but four were 
new commitments . 

New Programs 

1. Census Data - The Commission was able to set in motion a program to acquire cen- 
sus data from the 1970 Census of Population and Housing. This activity has already 
produced the most complete and comprehensive census reference file in the region. 
To date, over 500,000 pieces of census data are on file in the regional office. 
Much of this information has already been given to the City of Lawrence, and the 
staff is available to assist in making the data available to other communities. 

54 



2. Technical Assistance - 1971 saw the initiation of a program aimed at providing 
local planning boards with technical assistance, The staff contacted each planning 
agency and reviewed with them their local planning activities. As a result of these 
contacts, the Commission had under consideration at the close of the year the estab- 
lishment of a recommended guide for determining the adequacy of local planning pro- 
grams . 

3. Council of Citizen Organizations - During the year, the Commission was instru- 
ment aT - IrTTormTnirirYel^ of Citizen Organizations to provide a forum 
and channel for communication between the individual citizen and regionwide activi- 
ties. The Council elected as its first President Mr. James L. Campbell, Director of 
the Haverhill Council on Aging. 

4. Solid Waste - The final new program begun by the Commission in 1971 was to be- 
come involved in the Solid Waste issue. This was a direct result of a series of 
seminars held late in 1970. Initial inquiries revealed that meaningful regionwide 
activities would have to await the completion of a statewide study being conducted 
by the Massachusetts Department of Public Works. 

Continuing Programs 

1. State and Federal Aid Project Review - As the state and federally designated 
Regional Clearinghouse for project review, the Commission has processed 24 local or 
state applications for State or Federal assistance totaling over 40 million dollars. 
Eight communities have been involved, although 62% of the projects involving 81% of 
the funds have been in the three cities. 

2. H ousing Program - During 1971, the Commission staff completed four elements of 
the Regional Housing Program. As a result of these studies, the Commission has 
adopted and recommended the uniform use of the following definitions when referring 
to Low-Moderate Housing and Standard Dwelling Unit: 

Low-Moderate Income Housing is a housing unit or units available or to be made 
available to an average family of four at a cost not exceeding $18,225 or a rent 
not exceeding $152 per month. 

Standard Dwelling Unit is one which is sound and provides a private entrance, 
hot and cold running water , private indoor bathroom facilities including wash basin, 
toilet, and bathtub or shower, properly installed heating facilities and is situated 
in a block free from severe environmental deficiencies, such as incompatible mixed 
uses, poor street and sidewalk conditions, traffic congestion, inadequate parking 
and loading facilities, abandoned buildings and/or excessive land coverage. 

As a result of the second study concerning housing starts in the region, it has 
been found that there is a very real possibility that the normal housing production 
system may not be able to supply the housing needs of the region. The 1970 Housing 
Inventory compiled from census data provides the basic facts on the regional housing 
situation. Preliminary analysis included in the study shows that at least 3,217 
units should be demolished, 1,717 units need to be rehabilitated, and 2,914 new 
units should be built, all just to provide adequate housing for the 1970 population. 

The fourth element of the housing program produced a set of criteria for eval- 
uating the suitability of a site for housing purposes. 

3. Civil Defense - At the request of the State and Federal Civil Defense agencies 
the Commission has employed a consultant to assist in the preparation of a Civil De- 
fense Shelter information package. The ultimate aim of this work is to place in 
each household specific instructions on how and where to find adequate shelter from 
nuclear fallout or in the event of a natural disaster. 

Thus far, it has been found that there are adequate shelter spaces available 
for everyone in the region but that residents of the towns of Merrimac, Groveland, 
Georgetown, and Boxford will have to find their shelter in Haverhill, Lawrence, and 
Andover . 

55 



4. Transportation Planning - In previous years the Commission has developed its 
transportation plans in association with the Merrimack Valley Transportation Coord- 
inating Committee. Since this committee has not been active during the year, the 
commission has decided to accept the Governor's request to work with the planning 
arm of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works. Thus, a contract was negotiated 
with the DPW which would enable the Commission to participate with the State plan- 
ning functions. It is still hoped that an adequate method of obtaining direct local 
participation in transportation planning can be found. 

5. Water and Sewer Planning - The Commission had planned to hire a consultant to 
assist it in preparing a regionwide water and sewer plan and program. This plan and 
program are required to ensure the availability of the maximum State and Federal aid 
for the water and sewer projects in any community. Although the Town Meetings ap- 
proved the Commission's request for special funds for this study in the spring, city 
approvals were not obtained until the fall. This hampered the Commission's attempts 
to obtain State or Federal assistance when the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development was unable to provide adequate matching funds. 

As of this writing the study is still required; the local funds have been 

placed in reserve, and a means of obtaining additional funds from the Environmental 
Protection Agency seems imminent. 

Commission Finances 

The Commission obtains its financial support from three sources: Member Cities 
and Towns, State Aid, and Federal Grants and Contracts. During the year the Com- 
mission expended $85,761.46 of the $88,826.34 it received and ended the year with a 
surplus of $2,315.14 which was used to reduce its levy on its members for 1972. 
The cost of the Commission's activities to the member communities for the year 1971 
was 10 cents per capita plus the special water and sewer study charge of l\ cents 
per capita . 



Margaret G. Towle Fund 



Under the terms of her will, the late Mrs. Margaret G. Towle, long-time resi- 
dent of Andover, bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be 
held and administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the 
Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from 
this fund "be devoted to the assistance or the procurement of assistance for worthy 
persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort or 
support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town 
Manager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income 
from the Fund in accordance with the specific wishes and instructions set down in 
the will. Because the size of the Fund has not permitted the employment of a full- 
time administrator or social worker, no such person has been appointed. The entire 
case load has come through referrals from the Town of Andover Welfare Department, 
other private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and, sometimes, 
through interested individuals. Consequently, the Trustees feel that, quite likely, 
many worthy situations have not yet been uncovered. 

During 1971, the Trustees of the Towle Fund have met on a regular monthly 
schedule and also at other unscheduled times, according to the urgency of the cir- 
cumstances. Several cases have been examined and discussed of which 17 were 
approved for assistance. 38 vouchers were issued calling for the payment of 
$8,150.65 by the Town Treasurer who has sole authority for the disbursement of 
funds. Total income for the year amounted to $17,765.48. The balance of the Fund 
on December 31, 1971, is $48,255.13. 



56 



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57 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
JURY LIST - JUNE 1971 



Ainscow, George W. 
Aitel, Moe Lawrence 
Alden, Richard L. 
Allen, Charles F. 
Allen, Roger V. 
Anderson, Carl N. 
Anderson, Charles W. Jr. 
Axelrod, Harry 
Awley, Arthur Jr. 
Auchterlonie, Robert L. 
Barous, Constance M. 
Barraclough, Norman 
Barton, Joseph F. 
Batcheller, Harold B. Jr , 
Baxter, James G. 
Bayliss, Frank B. 
Beanland, John E. 
Bodge, Bernice D. 
Bolduc, Joseph R. 
Bradshaw, Robert H. 
Brennan, John C. 
Bronson, Hugh J. 
Burwell, Grant H. 
Campagna, Michael J. 
Campbell, Daisy G. 
Carmichael, James G. 
Caswell, Helen E. 
Caswell, Walter C. 
Caughey, Martin T. Jr. 
Chadwick, Harry 
Clendaniel, W. Richard 
Clotworthy, Frances D. 
Colpitts, Gertrude W. 
Cookson, Harold T. 
Crane, Virginia R. 
Cratty, Jeannine F. 
Cushing, Richard H. 
Daniels, Richard W, 
Dargie, Philip A. 
Dargoonian, Rosanna M. 
Davis, Geoffrey S. 
Dearborn, Lauren R. 
Denoncourt, William R. 
DesRoches, Robert F. 
Douglass, Bruce E. 
Dowe, Richard J. 
Drazy, Elbert J. 
Driscoll, Joseph G. 
Dye, Thomas J. 
Earnshaw, Clarence 
Earnshaw, Donald G. 
Eastman, Weston D. 
Eisenhaur, Donald N. 
Elder, Robert W. 
Erickson, Edward I. 
Evans, James B. Jr. 
Fernandes, Anthony D. 
Dengler, Erdmuth 



Section Chief 

Engineer 

Loan Officer 

Marketing Consultant 

Insurance Salesman 

Technical Writer 

Real Estate Appraiser 

Pres. and Treas. 

Asst. Manager 

Machinist 

Bookkeeper 

Staff Assistant 

Operator 

Salesman 

Laundry Attendant 

Electrical Engineer 

Tax Examiner 

Homemaker 

Postal Clerk 

Quality Control 

Salesman 

Sales Manager 

Electrical Engineer 

Paper Salesman 

Housewife 

Manager 

Thrift Shop Manager 

Retired 

Builder 

Retired 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Electronic Distributor 

At Home 

Housewife 

Maintenance Electrician 

Electrical Engineer 

Technical Manager 

Housewife 

Purchasing Manager 

Inspector 

Department Chief 

Vice Pres. & Asst. Treas. 

Construction Supt. 

Manager 

Electrical Engineer 

Pressman 

Sales-Shoe Last Mfr. 

Admin. Assistant 

Supervisor 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Foreman 

Manager 

Retired 

Supervisor 

Department Head 

Library Assistant 



59 Love joy Road 
276 Andover Street 

33 Porter Road 

13 Geneva Road 

14 Lupine Road 

14 Fleming Avenue 
19 Beech Circle 

27 Alden Road 
16 Avon Street 
21 Hall Avenue 

98 Central Street 
16 Arcadia Road 

34 Florence Street 
11 Lincoln Street 
43 Lowell Street 

35 Washington Avenue 
120 North Main St. 

4 Henderson Avenue 

14 Brechin Terrace 
211 Beacon Street 
30 Fox Hill Road 

15 Gleason Street 
15 Pine Street 

28 Theodore Avenue 

98 Cheever Circle 
59 Whittier Street 

5 Dumbarton Street 
5 Dumbarton Street 

102 Cross Street 
160 Lowell Street 
5 Lockway Road 
159 Holt Road 

7 Oak Street 
197 River Road 

7 Argyle Street 
139 Chestnut Street 

10 Dufton Road 

4 Mitton Circle 

5 Patricia Circle 

23 Blanchard Street 

8 Dumbarton Street 
109 Elm Street 

11 Marion Avenue 

103 Reservation Road 
19 Pasho Street 

39 High Street 

6 Amherst Road 

24 Juliette Street 

25 Smithshire Estate 
287 North Main Street 

99 Lowell Street 
18 Argyle Street 
11 Pine Tree Lane 
68 Love joy Road 
28 Foster Circle 
10 Ivy Lane 

5 Glen Meadow Road 
5 Lincoln Circle 



58 



Ferrier, Robert L. 
Ferris, Virginia C. 
Fiedler, Wallace C. 
Fitzgerald, Frederick P. 
Fleming, David A., Jr. 
Forma, Bette E. 
Fox, Pauline B. 
Fraser, Ellen F. 
Fredrickson, Robert A. 
Fredrickson, Bertha E. 
Garrison, Jedediah L. 
Gerraughty, James V. 
Goddard, Harold C. Jr. 
Gordon, Katherine M. 
Gordon, Walter N. 
Gray, Arthur G. Jr. 
Green, Gerard K. 
Guillet, Arthur 0. 
Guilmette, Richard P. J. 
Gulezian, Vahey S. 
Hall, Albertine E. 
Hall, Russell E. 
Haller, Harold 
Hammond, Virginia H. 
Hannon, Jo hi J. 
Hansen, Edwin B. Jr. 
Harig, Karl G. Jr. 
Hart, William J. 
Hayes, Charles E. 
Hayes, Ruth 
Healy, Sarah L. 
Hensel, Waldo G. 
Higgins, John G. 
Hoffman, Joseph W. 
Homsey, Emily W. 
Hood, Thomas M. 
Howe, Charles P. 
Hoyer, Mary 
Hoyt, Robert S. Jr. 
Hudson, William T. 
Inman, Glenn W. 
Innes, Robert B. 
Jameson, Chester W. 
Johnson, Charles M. 
Johnson, Mitchell Jr. 
Jones, Nancy J. 
Kaczynski, Charles S. 
Keaney, Sylvester A. Jr. 
Kempton, Albert E. 
Kenney, Allan R. 
Kibbee, Arthur S. 
Kimball, Margaret G. 
King, Harold T. 
King, Ruth A. 
Klie, Robert H. 
Krikorian, Michael H. 
Lefebvre, Robert J. 
LeGendre, Alice R. 
Lewis, Warren A. 
Lindholm, Edward M. 
Locke, Benjamin W. 
Look, Robert E. 
Loomer , Barbara A . 
Low, Thomas W. 
Lynch, Raymond 



Electrician 

Telephone Operator 

Supervisor 

Salesman 

Program-Mfg. Coordinator 

Homemaker 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Asst. Art Director 

Clerk 

Electrical Engineer 

President & Treasurer 

Cost Analyst 

Purch. Dept. Clerk 

Retired 

Layout Operator 

Reg. Representative 

Technician 

Technician 

Electrical Engineer 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Office Service Manager 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Sales Manager 

Automobile Salesman 

Merchandise Packer 

Sales Manager 

At Home 

Housewife 

Retired 

Investment Broker 

Plumbing & Heating Bus. 

Head Desk Clerk 

Asst. Secretary 

Salesman 

Homemaker 

Designer 

Manager-Qual . Assurance 

Facilities Director 

Senior Engineer 

Engineering Supervisor 

Foreman 

Mfg. Manager 

Housewife 

Toolmaker 

Retired 

Mechanical Engineer 

Civil Engineer 

Shipper 

Housewife 

Development Engineer 

Telephone Engineer 

Department Head 

Superintendent 

Asst. Store Manager 

Housewife 

Investment Banker 

Super. General Engineer 

Toolmaker 

President 

Exec. Director 

Foreman 

Shipper 



249 Andover Street 
62 Maple Avenue 

36 Chandler Circle 
95 Central Street 

14 Elysian Drive 

12 Barrington Drive 
10 Appletree Lane 
29 Boutwell Road 

16 Arundel Street 
1 Arrowood Lane 

15 Arcadia Road 

43 High Street 

69 Shawsheen Road 

37 Maple Avenue 
37 Maple Avenue 
90 Bellevue Road 
12 Avon Street 

1 Walnut Avenue 
Off Beacon Street 

10 Arthur Road 
148 Argilla Road 

7 Hall Avenue 

2 Kenilworth Street 
Chapel Avenue 

5 Apollo Circle 
12 Vine Street 

3 Patricia Circle 

6 Henderson Avenue 
90 Cheever Circle 
28 Phillips Street 
93 Main Street 

11 Arcadia Road 
Timothy Drive 
57 Marilyn Road 

27 High Plain Road 

6 Juniper Road 
142 Hidden Road 
66 Wildwood Road 
53 Carmel Road 
151 Osgood Street 
5 Stinson Road 

57 Juniper Road 
61 Greenwood Road 
82 Woburn Street 
71 Central Street 
157 Hidden Road 
79 Lowell Jet. Road 

4 Carisbrooke Street 
55 Summer Street 

8 Chatham Road 
78 Maple Avenue 

1 Meadowbrook Drive 
50 Ballardvale Road 
50 Ballardvale Road 

17 Rolling Ridge Road 
22 Gleason Street 

20 Clark Road 

4 Burton Farm Drive 

7 Kirkland Drive 

44 Chestnut Street 
189 Highland Road 
19 Kirkland Drive 

18 Osgood Street 
60 Maple Avenue 

16 Cuba Street 



59 



MacKenzie, William 
MacLeish, Russell C. 
MacMillan, Chester A. 
Marotta, George J. 
Marshall, Karl L. 
Mason, Robert F. 
Maxwell, Allen R. 
McAllister, John B. 
McCabe, Edwin C. 
McCarthy, Irene H. 
McCarthy, John W. Jr. 
McGrath, Harold E. 
McKeon, John J. 
McKit trick, Thomas A. 
McLean, John 
Meinelt, Theodore E. Jr. 
Meyers, Bernice M. 
Miller, Alwyne C. 
Miller, Frances S. 
Miller, Norman L. 
Milligan, Charles E. 
Mitchener, Paul E. 
Mooney, Arthur G. 
Moriarty, Wilfred D. 
Mowat, Elsie 
Nadeau, Aime G. 
Neisser, Wilson R. 
Neumark, Arthur I. 
Neunzer, Eric H. 
Newman, Winthrop R. 
Nichols, Robert M. 
Nowell, Frederick N. Jr. 
Orlando, Frank J. 
Orth, William R. , Jr. 
O'Toole, Austin P. 
Parker, David B. 
Parson, Esther M. 
Partridge, Walter H. 
Patterson, Helen S. 
Pendleton, Andrew S. Jr. 
Perry, Allen T. 
Perry, Virginia M. 
Piazza, Augustine 
Poland, Frank S. 
Potter, Jean W. 
Poulin, Donald J. 
Poynter, Elizabeth V. 
Poynter, Horace M. Jr. 
Price, Thomas D. 
Rairigh, Mildred W. 
Ratyna, Edward 
Reed, Theodore W. 
Reidy, John J. 
Roberts, Margaret C. 
Rice, Norman W. Jr. 
Robinson, David D. 
Robinton, Charles T. 
Rollins, Philip E. 
Ruhl, Malcolm J. 
Ryder, Eleanor M. 
Saba, Stanley 
Sabbagh, Linda H. 
Sagaser, Donald D. 
Sawaya, Mitchell 
Seikunas, Ruth E. 



Lay-out Man 

Exec. Sales Representative 

Retired 

Supervisor 

Working Foreman 

Electronic Technician 

Personnel Director 

Unemployed 

Retired 

Social Worker 

Motor Truck Distributor 

Cost Accountant 

Millwright 

Retired 

Inspector 

Bldg. Maint. Mechanic 

Registered Nurse 

Layout & Utility Man 

Housewife 

Vice-Pres. Bank 

Machinist Foreman 

Sales Manager 

Box Maker 

Clerk 

At Home 

Retired 

Retired 

Sales Manager 

Press Feeder 

Clerk 

Sr. Layout Designer 

Insurance Broker 

Land Surveyor 

Administration Director 

Draftsman 

Research Chemist 

Housewife 

Chief Mechanical Engr. 

Housewife 

Unemployed 

N. E. Tel. Co. 

Housewife 

Job Analyst 

Welder 

Library Co-Director 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Mechanical Engineer 

Staff Engineer 

Housewife 

Commercial Artist 

Sales Supervisor 

Store Manager 

Tax Examiner 

Working Foreman 

Architectural Draftsman 

Test Supervisor 

Chief-Pumping Station Oper. 

Self-employed 

Welcome Wagon Hostess 

Acct. Executive 

Secretary (Part-time) 

Electrical Engineer 

Sr. Engr. Administrator 

Executive Secretary 



215 Lowell Street 
10 Thresher Road 
28 River Street 
91 Argilla Road 
119 Chestnut Street 
50 Brookfield Road 
16 Upland Road 

53 Whittier Street 

16 Robandy Road 
74 Morton Street 

7 Marion Avenue 
Off Greenwood Road 

9 Hartigan Court 

14 Walnut Avenue 

8 Cuba Street 
173 Elm Street 

32 Marland Street 
B2 Colonial Drive 

17 Lowell Street 
17 Lowell Street 

21 Tewksbury Street 

2 Oriole Drive 
26 Burnham Road 

55 Elm Street 

10 Crescent Drive 
156 High Street 
58 Prospect Road 
90 Elm Street 

54 Stevens Street 
121 Elm Street 

69 Gould Road 
23 Cheever Circle 
65 Stevens Street 
63 Memorial Circle 
7 Carlisle Street 

33 Ballardvale Road 
104 Hidden Road 

47 Bartlet Street 
17 High Plain Road 

11 Osgood Street 

95 Ballardvale Road 

218 Holt Road 

519 So. Main Street 

9 Wildwood Road 
26 Bancroft Road 

15 Beech Circle 
68 Elm Street 
68 Elm Street 

38 Mary Lou Lane 

3 Old South Lane 
21 Brechin Terrace 
11 Cabot Road 

17 Flint Circle 
52 Pine Street 
81 Bellevue Road 
11 Wild Rose Drive 
15 Lincoln Circle 
397 Lowell Street 
42 Walnut Avenue 
186 Chestnut Street 
144 Lovejoy Road 
63 Lucerne Drive 

56 Chestnut Street 

5 Twin Brooks Circle 
21 Gould Road 



60 



Shaw, Patricia C. 
Shea, Cornelius D. 
Sheehy, Kathleen C. 
Shepherd, Frank 
Sherman, Frank J. 3rd 
Sherman, Robert E. 
Shorten, Frederick V. 
Simpson, Edward F. 
Skinner, Malcolm E. 
Smeltzer, Allan J. 
Smith, Dorothy E. 
Smith, George W. 
Snyder, Edith J. 
Smith, Edmund 
Smyth, Charles W. 
Sparks, James K. Sr. 
Spinney, Donald A. 
Sproul, Norman D. 
Stanley, Charles A. 
Starkweather, David C. 
Stevenson, Frank B. 
Stewart, Aubery A. 
Storlazzi, Ernest 0. 
Strong, Eldon H. 
Tallini, Lucille 
Tallmadge, Gilbert F. 
Temple, James A. 
Thompson, Lester M. 
Thomson, Alexander 
Thoms'on, Alexander Jr. 
Thorn, John H . 
Tibbetts, Lawrence A. 
Trenholm, James T. 
Urquhart, William M. 
Valentine, William R. 
VanDerZee, Robert 
Vannett, William B. 
Walsh, Edward B. 
Walsh, William R. 
Webb, Alfred E. 
Webster, Walter N. 
West, Howard A. 
Westfall, Leslie D. 
Wetterberg. Glennie P. 
Whitworth, Harold L. 
Wilkinson, Marcia A. 
Wilson, Ethel M. 
Wilson, Walter C. Jr. 
Wilton, Robert B. 
Winter, Harold 
Winters, Claire J. 
Wojtkun, Janina B. 
Woodworth, Webster I. 
Wormwood, Helen G. 
Wright, Jason C. 
Wrigley, Henry W. 
Zaremba, Stanley A. 
Zink, Alvin J. Jr. 



Homemaker 

Chief Draftsman 

Housewife 

Electronics Lab. Super. 

System Planning Engr. 

Electrical Engineer 

Gas Dispatcher 

Laborer 

Shipper 

Stat. Steam Engineer 

Cafeteria Manager (School) 

Control Operator 

Housewife 

Retired 

Claims Supervisor 

Design Analyst 

Insurance Adjuster 

Asst. Treas. & Mgr. 

Loan Specialist 

Senior Engineer 

Mech. Engineer 

Bank Manager 

Cutting Foreman 

Electrical Engineer 

Wireman 

Co-ordinator 

Unemployed 

Retired 

Clerk 

Steamfitter 

Controller 

Salesman 

Plant Superintendent 

Elec. Design Engineer 

Senior Electronic Engr. 

Manufacturer 

Receiving Clerk 

Senior Engineer 

Aircraft Maint. Instructor 

Auto Body Mechanic 

Semi-Retired 

Control Room Engineer 

Roll Builder 

Invoice Analyst 

Self-employed 

At Home 

Housewife 

Chief Exec. Officer 

Insurance Broker 

Retired 

Part-time Secretary 

Homemaker 

Automobile Dealer 

Housewife 

Community Relations 

Car Salesman 

Expediter 

Staff Engineer 



14 Strawberry Hill Rd, 
11 Arundel Street 
241 Lowell Street 
74 Princeton Avenue 
3 Midland Circle 
6 College Circle 

50 Dufton Road 

II Amherst Road 
67 Walnut Avenue 

57 Tewksbury Street 
145 River Road 
25 Brechin Terrace 
63 Maple Avenue 

10 Maple Avenue 
117 Lowell Street 
18 River Street 

18 Pasho Street 
38 Holt Road 

23 Pasho Street 

14 Charlotte Drive 

31 Chandler Circle 

6 Shepley Street 

7 Canterbury Street 
41 Linwood Street 

19 Marland Street 
19 Johnson Road 

32 Bellevue Road 
19 Chandler Circle 

3 Walnut Avenue 
29 Stevens Street 

III North Main Street 

4 Glen Meadow Road 

15 Westwind Road 
3 Gray Road 

56 Woburn Street 
1 Napier Road 

6 Brechin Terrace 

33 Rock Ridge Road 
37 Pasho Street 

86 Ballardvale Road 

7 Carriage Hill Road 
152 Haggetts Pond Rd. 

41 Summer Street 

51 Summer Street 

5 Cedar Road 
Foster Pond 

88 Lowell Street 
28 William Street 
Foster Pond Road 
32 Foster Circle 

42 Enmore Street 
19 Moraine Street 
310 North Main Street 

11 Lowell Junction Rd. 
13 Carisbrooke Street 
1 Lowell Junction Rd. 
421 South Main Street 
21 Chester Street 



61 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 1, 1971 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, January 20, 1971, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and 
assembled at the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five 
and Six, viz: The William A. Doherty School, Bartlet Street, in Precinct One; the 
Lower Hall, Andover Baptist Church, in Precinct Two; the Sacred Heart School, Bal- 
moral Street, in Precinct Three; the West Elementary School, Beacon Street, in Pre- 
cinct Four; the South Elementary School, Woburn Street, Ballardvale, in Precinct 
Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in Precinct Six, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE FIRST DAY OF MARCH, 1971 

at 8:00 o'clock A. M. , to act upon the following articles: 

ESSEX, SS. March 1, 1971 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the 
time and places and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published 
seven days. 

Thomas P. Eldred, Constable 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

ARTICLE 1. 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at eight o'clock A. M. 
and closed at eight o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 5,630, viz: 

Precinct 1 - 1203 Precinct 2 - 580 Precinct 3 - 805 

Precinct 4 - 1372 Precinct 5 - 480 Precinct 6 - 1190 







PRECINCTS 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


MODERATOR - FOR ONE 


YEAR 


834 


420 


558 


893 


325 


647 


Arthur Williams 




295 


109 


203 


435 


140 


518 


Richard J. Bowen 




74 


51 


44 


44 


15 


25 


Blanks 

SELECTMEN - TWO FOR 


THREE YEARS 


583 


243 


351 


468 


181 


607 


Roger W. Collins 




223 


143 


110 


163 


87 


136 


Benjamin C. Brown 




335 


150 


262 


571 


167 


307 


Francis J. Byrne 




422 


150 


273 


585 


188 


707 


Milton Greenberg 




313 


120 


244 


457 


149 


256 


Michael W. Morris 




255 


165 


178 


217 


92 


164 


William W. Stewart 




275 


189 


192 


283 


96 


203 


Blanks 





3677 

1700 

253 



2433 
862 
1792 
2325 
1539 
1071 
1238 



62 







PRECINCTS 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


462 


214 


364 


491 


197 


690 


656 


284 


403 


671 


245 


786 


876 


417 


559 


1100 


365 


649 


412 


245 


284 


482 


153 


255 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

Virginia H. Cole 2418 

William F. King 3045 

Francis E. Griggs Jr. 3966 

Blanks 1831 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY - 
ONE FOR FIVE YEARS 



660 


380 


405 


583 


259 


483 


Thomas P. 


Eldred 


147 


61 


135 


280 


80 


214 


Walter J. 


Corcoran 


335 


102 


201 


407 


106 


430 


Donald J. 


Mulvey 


61 


37 


64 


102 


35 


63 


Blanks 
QUESTION 


NO. 1 


723 


381 


499 


860 


323 


752 


YES 




357 


130 


239 


431 


134 


353 


NO 




123 


69 


67 


81 


23 


85 


Blanks 
QUESTION 


NO. 2 


685 


375 


451 


742 


291 


696 


YES 




392 


138 


268 


512 


161 


396 


NO 




126 


67 


86 


118 


28 


98 


Blanks 





2770 
917 

1581 
362 



3538 

1644 

448 



3240 

1867 

523 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted for on one ballot and the 
check lists were used. 

REPORT OF WARDEN- PRECINCT 1 March 1, 1971 

Number of votomatic ballots received 2000. Number of spoiled ballots 6. Number 
of unused ballots 800. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 806. Number of ballots 
voted 1194. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 1194. Number of defective ballots 3. Number of ballots counted by computer 
1191. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of defective ballots hand-counted 3. 
Number of absentee ballots 9. Grand total for precinct 1203. Forrest H. Noyes,Jr. 
Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty, Richard Caldwell. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 2 March 1, 1971 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1000. Number of spoiled ballots 4. Number 
of unused ballots 419. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 423. Number of ballots 
voted 577. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 577. Number of defective ballots 2. Number of ballots counted by computer 
575. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of defective ballots hand-counted 2. 
Number of absentee ballots 3. Grand total for precinct 580. Augustine P. Sulli- 
van, Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty, John F. Bernhardt. 

REPORT OF WARDEN- PRECINCT 3 March 1, 1971 



Number of votomatic ballots received 2000. Number of spoiled ballots 4. Number 
of unused ballots 1192. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1196. Number of 
ballots voted 804. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for 
computer count 804. Number of defective ballots 4. Number of ballots counted by 
computer 797. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of defective ballots hand- 
counted 4. Number of absentee ballots 4. Grand total for Precinct 805. A. Norman 
Warhurst, Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty, Jacob Jacobson. 



63 



REPORT OF WARDEN- PRECINCT 4 March 1, 1971 

Number of votomatic ballots received 3000. Number of spoiled ballots 10. Number 
of unused ballots 121. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1631. Number of ballots 
voted 1369. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 1369. Number of defective ballots 4. Number of ballots counted by computer 
1365. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of defective ballots hand-counted 4. 
Number of absentee ballots 3. Grand total for Precinct 1372. James D. Doherty, 
Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty, Frederick Welch. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 5 March 1, 1971 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1000. Number of spoiled ballots 0. Number of 
unused ballots 523. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 523. Number of ballots 
voted 477. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 477. Number of defective ballots 1. Number of ballots counted by computer 
476. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of defective ballots hand-counted 1. 
Number of absentee ballots 3. Grand total for Precinct 480. Irving 0. Piper, 
Precinct Warden. Police officers on duty, Richard W. Enos and George E. Miller. 

REPORT OF WARDEN- PRECINCT 6 March 1, 1971 



Number of votomatic ballots received 3000. Number of spoiled ballots 3. Number of 
unused ballots 1817. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1820. Number of ballots 
voted 1180. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 1180. Number of defective ballots 3. Number of ballots counted by computer 
1176. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of defective ballots hand-counted 3. 
Number of absentee ballots 11. Grand total for Precinct 1190. Chester A. MacMil- 
lan, Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty, Richard 0. Aumais. 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by virtue of 
Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Monday, March 8, 1971, at 7:30 o'clock 
P. M. at the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 8, 1971 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 1090 persons admitted to the 
meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:35 P. M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rabbi Harry A. Roth of Temple Emanuel, Lawrence, 
Rabbi Roth is an Andover resident. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman George E. Heseltine. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit twenty-eight non-voters, one of whom wished 
to address the meeting. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the Auditorium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to dispense with the reading of 
the Warrant and the return of service of the constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator refer to the 
articles by number and by subject matter. 



64 



ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, two 
members of the School Committee for three years, one member of the Andover Housing 
Authority for five years and any other town officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot, also to vote on the following questions: 

QUESTION NO. 1 "Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year 1949 
entitled, 'An Act Relative to the Granting of Vacations 
for members of the Regular or Permanent Police and Fire 
Forces in Certain Cities and Towns, ' be accepted?" 

QUESTION NO. 2 "Shall the Town vote that all employees of the municipal 

cemetery, except the superintendent, be placed within the 
classified Civil Service?" 

All the above candidates and questions to be voted for on one ballot. The polls 
will be open from 8:00 o'clock A. M. to 8:00 o'clock P. M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of the election and questions on March 1, 
1971 and declared Arthur Williams elected as Moderator and that he had previously 
been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that office. 

The Town Clerk also declared the other successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices and that they had been sworn to the faithful performance of the 
duties of their offices. 

Roger W. Collins, Selectman for Three Years 

Milton Greenberg, Selectman for Three Years 

William F. King, School Committee for Three Years 

Francis E. Griggs, Jr. , School Committee for Three Years 

Thomas P. Eldred, Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

QUESTION NO. 1 — The Vote YES 3538 NO 1644 

QUESTION NO. 2 — The Vote YES 3240 NO 1867 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by 
ballot . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Charles F. Dalton be elected Trus- 
tee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of elected TOWN OFFICERS for the ensuing 
year. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the salaries of the elected TOWN 
OFFICERS be established as follows for the ensuing year: (each item being voted on 
separately) : 

Moderator $ 25.00 for each town meeting 

Selectmen 

Chairman $1,000.00 per year 

Members $ 800.00 per year 



65 



ARTICLE 4. To determine what 
Town Budget as submitted by the 
in its report. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it 
sums of money : 

Town Moderator 

Board of Selectmen 



Town Manager 

Elections and Registrations 

Finance Committee 
Town Accountant 

Town Treasurer 

Town Collector 

Board of Assessors 

Town Counsel 
Town Clerk 
Planning Board 
Municipal Buildings 

Conservation Commission 

Industrial Development 
Commission 

Central Services 
Board of Appeals 
Council on Aging 
Police Department 



sums of money shall be appropriated for the 1971 
Town Manager and reviewed by the Finance Committee 



was VOTED to raise and appropriate the following 



Personal Services 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $300 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $700 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $150 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $200 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $800 

for out-of-state travel) 



75.00 



4 


,800 


.00 


2 


,850 


.00 


36 


,193 


.00 


5 


,025 


.00 


13 


,420 


.00 


11 


,300 


.00 


2 


500 


.00 


32 


,744 


.00 


17 


,325 


.00 


23 


,631 


.00 


3 


500 


00 


23 


975 


00 


3 


365 


00 


35 


078 


00 


11 


225 


00 


6 


000 


00 


7 


050 


00 


15 


960. 


00 


2 


440. 


00 


7 


270. 


00 


13, 


810. 


00 


12 


286. 


00 


21, 


600. 


00 


3, 


125 


00 


2, 


950. 


00 


6, 


290. 


00 


17, 


200. 


00 


1, 


920. 


00 




700. 


00 


1, 


752. 


00 


4, 


100. 


00 


472, 


799. 


00 


67, 


500. 


00 



66 



Fire Department 

Civil Defense 

Animal Control 
Electrical Inspection 
Weights and Measures 
Building Inspection 

Highways (General Maintenance) 

Parks 

Forestry 

Vehicle Maintenance 

Street Lighting 
Engineering 

Sewers 

Landfill Operation 

Garbage Contract 
Board of Health 

Animal Inspection 
Veterans' Services 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $500 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $100 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $100 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $50 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
Assistance 



576 


,047 


.00 


46 


,000 


.00 


1 


,000 


00 


2 


,550 


00 


7 


,475 


00 


3 


,750 


00 


4 


,470 


.00 




825 


00 


2 


400 


00 




688 


00 


18 


,294 


00 


3 


,140 


00 


183 


224 


00 


212 


100 


00 


50 


439 


00 


13 


000 


00 


51 


510 


00 


31 


875 


00 


26 


272 


00 


83 


600 


00 


70 


000 


00 


32 


352 


00 


1 


720 


00 


24 


890 


00 


17 


050 


00 


24 


969 


00 


39 


000. 


00 


50 


000 


00 


30 


407 


00 


3 


420. 


00 




600 


00 


15 


757. 


00 




975 


00 


49. 


251. 


00 



After a lengthy discussion on Items 84 and 85 (Personal Services and Other Expen- 
ses - School Department) of Budget Article 4, action was inconclusive. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted at 11:15 P. M. to adjourn the 
meeting until Monday, March 15, 1971 at 7:30 P. M. in the Memorial Auditorium on 
Bartlet Street. 



67 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 15, 1971 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 1409 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:30 P. M. , 
having been adjourned from Monday, March 8, 1971 at 11:15 P. M. 

The Moderator declared that discussion on Items 84 and 85 of Budget Article 4 
(School Department Budget) be resumed. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit fifty non-voters, three of whom wished to 
address the meeting. 

ARTICLE 4-cont. 



Andover School Department Personal Services $5,173,660.00 

Other Expenses (Incl. $9,500 1,250,944.00 
for out-of-state travel) 

Regional Vocational School 103,300.00 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was voted to ad- 
journ the regular Town Meeting and proceed to act on the Special Town Meeting called 
for March 15, 1971. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 15, 1971 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to abandon or discontinue the project for 
the construction, original equipping and furnishing of a town hall for which the sum 
of $550,000 was appropriated and borrowed pursuant to the vote adopted under Article 
11 at the 1965 Annual Town Meeting and further, to see if the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $35,000 or any other sum, for the cost of plans and 
specifications for constructing and equipping an addition to the present town hall 
and remodelling of the present town hall and determine whether such appropriations 
shall be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds, or by transfer of the 
unexpended balance of funds appropriated by vote on Article 9 of the Warrant of the 
Annual Town Meeting of 1970, and, further, to see if the Town will vote to petition 
the General Court for the passage of any special law necessary to authorize and 
validate any action taken or vote adopted pursuant to this Article and to grant to 
the Town the power to appropriate the unexpended balance of the aforesaid $550,000 
loan for other purposes, or take any other action relative to the foregoing matters. 

Article 1 was not considered. This article was disapproved by the Finance Commit- 
tee. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn the Special Town Meet- 
ing at 10:55 P. M. until Saturday, March 20, 1971 at 10:00 A. M. in the Memorial 
Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was voted that the 
regular Town Meeting also stand adjourned until Saturday, March 20, 1971 at 10:00 
A. M. in the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 



68 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 20, 1971 

The meeting was called to order at 10:05 A. M. by Arthur Williams, Moderator, 
having been adjourned from March 15, 1971 at 10:55 P. M. 

The Moderator announced that there would be a recess until a quorum was present. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit twelve non-voters (students) to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking or eating in the Audito- 
rium. 

The Moderator opened the meeting at 10:35 A. M. when the required quorum was 
reached. 

The check lists used at entrance showed 440 persons admitted to the meeting. 

The Moderator allowed Chairman Robert A. Watters of the Board of Selectmen to 
address the meeting regarding Article 1 of the Special Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$18,000 to remodel and to reconstruct the Stowe School which is to be used for ad- 
ministration purposes. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 2 as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $18,000 by taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman. The 
Finance Committee approved this article unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to rezone the following lots — 4, 4a, 5, 
6, 7, 8, 9, 9a, 10, as shown on the Town Assessors' Map 126, Lots 9, 10, 11 as 
shown on the Town Assessors' Map 143, from Industrial A to Single Residence C. 

Inserted at request of John J. Clarke, Jr. and others. 

Article 3 was withdrawn because of a legality. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was VOTED at 
10:45 A. M. to revert to the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 



MARCH 20, 1971 



ARTICLE 4-cont. 



Library 



Recreation Department 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl $550 for 

out-of-state travel, less 

dog license reimbursements 

($2,302) and Grant-in-Aid ($4,283) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



176,080.00 
90,687.00 



55,845.00 
18,955.00 



69 



Water 

Spring Grove Cemetery 

Insurance 

Employee Benefits 

Patriotic and Civic Celebra- 
tions 

Veterans' Headquarters and 
Rental 

Retirement 

Non-Contributory Pensions 

Damages to Persons and Property 

Interest Expense 

Bond Issue Expense 

Bond Issue Redemptions 

Compensation Plan 

Reserve Fund 

Total BUDGET to be raised by taxation 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses (incl. $1,000 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
(less investment income 
$11,480=$22,831) 
Other Expenses 



$ 152,749.00 
124,100.00 



34,311.00 

19,680.00 

106,500.00 

41,000.00 

5,435.00 

2,760.00 

188,528.00 

23,206.00 

3,000.00 

629,701.00 

5,000.00 

1,170,000.00 

110,000.00 

50,000.00 

$12,094,769.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM TAXATION) 

ARTICLE 6 Chapter 90 Highway Construction $ 80,000.00 

ARTICLE 8 Gr. Lawrence Sanitary District 500.00 

ARTICLE 9 MBTA Contract 2,500.00 

ARTICLE 12 Additional Costs-Question No. 1 on ballot ) 5,721.00 
$3,381 for Fire Dept. $2,340 for Police Dept. ) 

ARTICLE 23 Regional Refuse Disposal Board 3,000.00 

ARTICLE 24 Improving drainage at Landfill Operation 40,000.00 

ARTICLE 25 Sanitary Landfill Operations 34,000.00 

ARTICLE 26 Eng'g. Studies-additional Sanitary Landfill Sites 45,000.00 

ARTICLE 33 Central Merr. Valley Regional Planning District Commission 1,687.80 

ARTICLE 40 Sewer Mains-Lupine Road and Central Street 33,145.00 

ARTICLE 46 Install Road Drains 50,000.00 

ARTICLE 47 Drainage-William Street and So. portions of Yale, ) 25,000.00 

George and Dartmouth Roads ) 



70 



ARTICLE 49 Study-Connector Road, Route 93 and Lawrence $ 9,500.00 

ARTICLE 52 Aerial Photographs of the Town 6,500.00 

ARTICLE 54 Drop-in Center — Leasing and Operating 4,900.00 

ARTICLE 55 Parking Area — West Andover Community Center 2,200.00 

ARTICLE 56 Parking Area rear Town Hall 4,000.00 

ARTICLE 60 Recreation Park Multi-purpose Area 20,000.00 

ARTICLE 61 Construct Dike No. 3 at Pomps Pond 5,000.00 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ARTICLE 2 Remodel and reconstruct Stowe School 18,000.00 

Total SPECIAL ARTICLES to be raised by taxation $390,653.80 

SPECIAL ARTICLE (TO BE BONDED) 

ARTICLE 36 Additional Sum for Water Treatment Plant $ 1,000,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS) 

ARTICLE 15 G. L. Chap. 44, Sect. 53C, Police Department $ 5,000.00 

Payment for off-duty work 

ARTICLE 29 Repair parking meters and paint parking lines 3,000.00 

in public parking lot (transfer from Parking 
Meter Fund) 

ARTICLE 38 Conservation Fund 18,700.00 

(transfer from amount received from State 
Self-Help Fund--re Garabedian property 

ARTICLE 39 Conservation Fund 35,000.00 

(transfer from amount received from State 
Self-Help Fund — re Shlakis property 

ARTICLE 40 Sewer Mains-Lupine Road and Central Street 

(from Article 41, Annual Town Meeting (1970) and 15,000.00 

from Article 16, Annual Town Meeting (1968) 16,855.00 

Total SPECIAL ARTICLES from available funds $ 93,555.00 

Grand Total Budget and Special Articles $13,578,977.80 

ARTICLE 7 Overlay Reserve to Reserve Fund $ 10,000.00 

ARTICLE 73 Free Cash to reduce 1971 tax rate $ 800,000.00 



71 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Town Manager and the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation 
of the revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 1971 and January 1, 1972, 
in accordance with provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, section 4, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or take any other ac- 
tion relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 5 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. 

At this time-12:25 P. M. , the Moderator declared a recess for lunch. 

After recess, the meeting was resumed at 1:15 P. M. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $80,000 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, the Town to be reimbursed 50% 
by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County; and to authorize the Town to acquire 
necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of emin- 
ent domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 6 and raise by taxa- 
tion the sum of $80,000 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, the Town to be reim- 
bursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County; and to authorize the Town to 
acquire necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain. 

The Vote-YES 356, NO 15 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $50,000 from Overlay Reserve 
to the Reserve Fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to transfer $10,000 from Overlay Reserve 
to the Reserve Fund. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $500 to meet the Town's share of the cost of the Greater Lawrence Sanitary 
District for the year 1971 as determined by Chapter 750 of the 1968 Acts of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 8 as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $500 from taxation. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $2,500 and to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a one year contract 
with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and to use said sum or any part 
thereof to defray deficits of the railroad resulting from providing commuter service 
from Andover to Boston. 

Action on Article 9 was deferred and would be considered before Article 75 in the 
warrant. 

A RTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the by-laws of the Town, by in- 
serting the following as the fourth paragraph of Article V, Section 1: The Town 
Manager, with the approval of a majority of the Selectmen, may sell personal proper- 
ty of the Town, at public or private sale, at such prices as may be deemed proper by 
the Manager and a majority of the Selectmen. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the By-Laws of the Town of Andover 
be amended by inserting the following as the fourth paragraph of Article V, Section 
1: — The Town Manager, with the approval of a majority of the Selectmen, may sell 
personal property of the Town at public sale at such prices as may be deemed proper 
by the Manager and a majority of the Selectmen. Items having, in the opinion of 
the Manager, a value of less than $100 may be sold by the Manager at private sale 
and that an account of each transaction made during the year shall be printed in the 

72 



Annual Town Report. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will amend the Town by-laws, Article X, to adopt 
the 1970 edition of the National Fire Prevention Code in place of the 1960 code 
presently in force under that article. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to amend the Town by-laws, Article X, to 
adopt the 1970 edition of the National Fire Prevention Code in place of the 1960 
code presently in force under that article. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation $5,721 and appro- 
priate $3,381 for the Fire Department and $2,340 for the Police Department to defray 
the additional costs required by the vote on Question 1 of the Ballot. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 12 be approved as printed in 
the warrant in the amount of $3,381 for the Fire Department and $2,340 for the Po- 
lice Department from taxation. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote that members of the Police Department 
shall receive the following compensation on an annual basis: 

Minimum 1 yr. 2 yr. 3rd yr . 
1st step 2nd step maximum 

Patrolman $8,250.00 $8,850.00 $9,500.00 $10,250.00 

Sergeant 11,244.00 12,292.00 

1 yr . maximum 

on petition of Lloyd W. Belbin and others. 

Article 13 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote that members of the police department 
shall receive no less than one hundred twenty-one (121) regular days off yearly, 
characteristic of the four-and-two work week, and no less than two consecutive days 
off weekly, on petition of Lloyd W. Belbin and others. 

Article 14 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 53C, as inserted by Acts of 1970, Chapter 344, under which all 
moneys received by the Town in payment for off-duty work details of members of the 
Police Department, would be deposited in the treasury, kept as a special fund by the 
Treasurer, and expended without further appropriation, at the direction of the Chief 
of Police, to pay Police Officers for such off-duty work details and, further, to 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 to initiate the special fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 15 be approved as printed in 
the warrant in the amount of $5,000 from available funds. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Chaise Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled, "Carriage Chase", North Essex Registry Plan 
#5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., Surveyed by Brooks, Jordan and Graves, 
Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the necessary deeds on 
file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Charles G. Hatch and others. 

Article 16 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Han- 
som Road as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled, "Carriage Chase", North Essex Registry Plan 
#5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., Surveyed by Brooks, Jordan and Graves, 
Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the necessary deeds on 

73 



file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Charles G. Hatch and others. 

Article 17 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Lan- 
dau Lane as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled, "Carriage Chase", North Essex Registry Plan 
#5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., Surveyed by Brooks, Jordan and Graves, 
Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the necessary deeds on 
file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Charles G. Hatch and others. 

Article 18 was not approved. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Phaeton Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled, "Carriage Chase", North Essex Registry 
Plan #5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., surveyed by Brooks, Jordan and 
Graves, Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the necessary 
deeds on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Charles G. Hatch and others. 

Article 19 was not approved. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Hackney Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled, "Carriage Chase", North Essex Registry 
Plan #5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., surveyed by Brooks, Jordan and 
Graves, Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the necessary 
deeds on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Charles G. Hatch and others. 

Article 20 was not approved. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name a 
portion of Bridle Path Road as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Carriage Chase," North Essex 
Registry Plan #5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., surveyed by Brooks, Jor- 
dan and Graves, Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the 
necessary deeds on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Charles G. Hatch and 
others. 

Article 21 was not approved. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of General Laws 
Chapter 40, Section 44A, under which the Moderator would appoint an unpaid committee 
to be known as The Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 22 be approved as printed in 
the warrant. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$3,000.00 to meet the expenses of a Regional Refuse Disposal Board, such money to 
be expended by such board under the provisions of General Laws c. 40 s. 44B, when 
and if such board is organized. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$3,000.00 to meet the expenses of a Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board, such 
money to be expended by such board under the provisions of General Laws c. 40 S.44B, 
when and if such board is organized. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or by a combination of the foregoing and appropriate 
$40,000 for the purpose of improving the drainage at the Landfill Operation off 
Chandler Road and authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by 
purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain. The persons whose 
lands would be affected are supposed to be: 



74 



Assessors' Map 147 Lot 6-Park, Robert A. & Catharine T. 

Assessors' Map 130 Lot 23-Belanger, George H. Jr. & Ida M. 

(Railroad bed east of Greenwood Road) 

Assessors' Map 148 Lot 13-Boston & Maine Corporation 

(Railroad bed west of Greenwood Road) 

Assessors' Map 148 Lot 8-Andover Village Improvement Society 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town raise by taxation and appro- 
priate $40,000 for the purpose of improving the drainage at the Landfill Operation, 
off Chandler Road and authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by 
purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain. The persons whose lands 
would be affected are supposed to be: 

Assessors' Map 147 Lot 6-Park, Robert A. & Catharine T. 

Assessors' Map 130 Lot 23-Belanger, George H. Jr. & Ida M. 

(Railroad bed east of Greenwood Road) 

Assessors' Map 148 Lot 13-Boston & Maine Corporation 

(Railroad bed west of Greenwood Road) 

Assessors' Map 148 Lot 8-Andover Village Improvement Society 

Further, that the use of the power of eminent domain on property supposed to be 
owned by Robert A. and Catharine T. Park be limited to improvement of the bed of 
the existing brook and discharge into that brook. 

The Vote — YES 347, No 22 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A report of the 
Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$34,000 for sanitary land fill operations. This is in addition to the sums appro- 
priated under the operating budget, Article 4 of this warrant. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 25 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $34,000 from taxation. A voluntary report of the Ando- 
ver Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$45,000 for surveys and engineering studies of additional Sanitary Land Fill sites, 
and authorize the Selectmen to use any part of said sum to acquire the necessary 
temporary easements, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 26 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $45,000 from taxation. The Vote YES 266, NO 71 — voted 
by more than 2/3 as required. 

A voluntary report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote that the form of Town Meeting in Andover 
be changed to a representative form. 

The total number of Representatives to number 240. This number to be divided by 
the population of each voting Precinct based on each five year count. 

A preliminary meeting would be held in each precinct, one week prior to the town 
meeting. 

Town Meeting would remain open for all, but only Town Meeting members could vote. 

Election to the Town Meeting would be by Precinct and the term would be for three 

75 



years. In order for this to be a continuing body, the candidates receiving the lar- 
gest number of votes (1/3) would serve three years, the next (1/3) two years and the 
remaining number, one year. 

On petition of Gerald H. Silverman and others. 

Article 27 was withdrawn. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was vote to adjourn 
the meeting at 4:30 P. M. until Thursday evening, March 25, 1971 at the Memorial 
Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 25, 1971 

The meeting was called to order at 7:35 P. M. by Arthur Williams, Moderator, 
having been adjourned from March 20, 1971 at 4:30 P. M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit seven non-voters, one of whom wished to ad- 
dress the meeting. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 627 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the by-laws of the Town, Arti- 
cle II, Section 7, relating to appropriation proposals, so that Section 7 will read 
as follows: 

"Any article in the warrant for a special Town Meeting which proposes the 
appropriation of funds, shall be considered and voted upon by such special 
Town Meeting only if the article is approved by the Finance Committee. 
This restriction shall not apply to the Town Meeting in October, established 
under the Town by-laws, Article II, Section 1A." 

Inserted at the request of the School Committee. 

Article 28 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $3,000 from the Parking 
Meter Fund for the repair of parking meters and the painting of parking lines with- 
in the public parking lot. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 29 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $3,000 from the Parking Meter Fund. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will accept Section 99 of Chapter 32 of the Gener- 
al Laws, relative to Advance Payments of Retirement Allowances to Employees of 
Cities, Towns or Counties, Authorized. 

Inserted at the request of the Board of Retirement. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 30 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to abandon or discontinue the project 
for the construction, original equipping and furnishing of a town hall for which the 
sum of $550,000 was appropriated and borrowed pursuant to the vote adopted under 
Article 11 at the 1965 Annual Town Meeting and, further, to see if the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $200,000, or any other sum, to construct, 
originally equip and furnish an addition to the present Town Hall and determine 



76 



whether such appropriations shall be raised by taxation, by transfer, by borrowing 
or otherwise, and, further, to see if the Town will vote to petition the General 
Court for the passage of any special law necessary to authorize and validate any 
action taken or vote adopted pursuant to this Article, or take any other action 
relative to the foregoing matters. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the Town abandon and dis- 
continue the project for the construction, original equipping, and furnishing of a 
Town Hall for which the sum of $550,000 was appropriated and borrowed pursuant to 
the vote adopted under Article 11 at the 1965 Annual Town Meeting. It was further 
moved that the Town petition the General Court for the passage of a special law to 
authorize the Town to appropriate the unexpended balance of the proceeds of the 
$550,000 loan issued for a new Town Hall project, pursuant to Section 3 of the vote 
adopted under Article 11 of the 1965 Annual Town Meeting, for any purpose for which 
a loan may be incurred for an equal or longer period of time. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman. A 
quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $100,000 or any other sum 
to remodel, reconstruct or make extra-ordinary repairs to the present Town Hall and 
determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by taxation, by transfer of 
available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or take any other action relative to the 
foregoing matters. 

Article 32 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$1,687.80 for the Central Merrimack Valley Regional Planning District Commission, to 
be used to defray the cost of regional water and sewerage planning studies. This 
sum is in addition to the sum appropriated in the budget for the Planning Board. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 33 as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $1,687.80 by taxation. 

A voluntary report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman, 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to amend its Zoning Bylaws by 
adding thereto the following: 

Section IIIA (2) — Add a new district designated as "NB-Neighborhood Business". 

By adding a new designation under Section IV B "Table of Use Regulations" a fourth 
category under business labeled "NB" . 

BUSINESS 
Item NB 

11. "Establishment for personal or consumer services" Y 

12. "Establishment for the retail sale of merchandise, or for the sale 

of such merchandise other than at retail if incidental to the 
operation of a retail establishment, including processing and/or 
assembly of merchandise when clearly accessory to the sale of 
such merchandise on the premises". Y 

16. "Self-service laundry or dry cleaning operation" SP 

17. "Restaurant or other establishment for the sale and consumption of 

food on the premises but excluding a curb service operation" SP 

20. "Business, professional or administrative office" SP 

24. "Gasoline service station, provided that no major automobile 

77 



repairs involving body work are made on the premises" SP 

32. "Public transportation station or terminal excluding airports" SP 

34B. Soil removal incidental to development and construction or 

miscellaneous removal of soil incidental to improvements, sub- 
ject to the provisions of Section VI. E. Pars. 1.2 and 1.3 Y 

36. Any accessory use, other than those hereinafter specifically 

mentioned, customarily incidental to a permitted principal use, 

provided that such accessory use in a residence district shall 

not be detrimental to the neighborhood in which it is located, 

by reason of noise, odor, dust, or other nuisance, traffic 

generation or hazard Y 

38. Use of a room or rooms in a dwelling or accessory building by 
permanent residents for the practice of a customary home occu- 
pation, provided that such practice does not involve; (a) sale 
of articles not produced on the premises; (b) exterior storage 
or display; (c) alteration of the residential character of the 
premises; (d) noise, heat, vibration or other objectional ef- 
fects discernible at the property line; or (e) the employment 
of more than one person not a member of the resident family. 
The following are some of the occupations excluded from this 
definition: beautician, barber, real estate salesman, dancing 
or musical instructor to more than one person at a time. Y 

41. Roadside stand for the sale of the produce primarily from land 
of the owner, provided that such stand shall be set back at 
least thirty feet from the way SP 

43. Uses clearly accessory and incidental to the permitted commer- 
cial, manufacturing, or industrial uses, including but not 
limited to customer and employer parking, retail trade or 
service operations, athletic and restaurant facilities for em- 
ployees, garage for storage or repair of company-owned motor 
vehicles, showrooms; also, heliports, provided a special permit 

from the Board of Appeals has been obtained therefor SP 

44. Advertising signs or devices subject to the requirements of Sec. 

VI. B. of this bylaw Y 

45. The parking or keeping of a truck or commercial type vehicle on 
property used for residential purposes provided the same (a) 
does not exceed 3/4 ton capacity, manuf acturer ' s rating, (b) is 
used as a means of transport to and from the resident's place 
of business; (c) is parked or kept in a closed garage and (d) 

is not loaded with flammable, noxious or dangerous material. Y 

46. With dwellings in all districts, the parking or keeping of 
commercial type vehicles or equipment other than those allowed 
in Item 45, provided that such parking will not, under the cir- 
cumstances be detrimental to the neighborhood; and provided 
further that such use may be permitted subject to conditions 
deemed necessary to safeguard the neighborhood, including 
limitations of time, number of vehicles, weight or capacity of 
vehicles or equipment. SP 

47. The parking or keeping of equipment or vehicles, or the main- 
tenance of temporary buildings on construction sites for a 
period not to exceed one year, provided a permit has been issued 

by the Building Inspector. Y 

In all other categories N 



78 



SECTION V. DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS 
A. Table of Dimensional Requirements 
Add a new category "Neighborhood Business" 



District 



Neighborhood 
Business 



(#1) 

Minimum Lot 

Area 
Squ. Ft. 



(#2 & #3) 



Dimensions 
Frontage 

Ft. 



1 acre 
(max. 2 acres) 

(#4) 

Max. Height-Ft. & 
number of Stories 



180 



Minimum 

Front 

Ft. 

40 



Yard 
Side 
Ft. 

50 



Depth 

Rear 

Ft. 

50 



Max. coverage, inc. 
Accessory Buildings 

% 

25% 



30' - 2 stories 

Add Paragraph to Section V B (10) as follows: 

10. No more than ten retail establishments shall be located in any 
NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS district and no single establishment shall have a 
floor area of more than 2,500 square feet, excluding any basement or 
cellar area in connection therewith, said basement or cellar area shall 
not be used to conduct a retail business but shall be used only for stor- 
age and the like. 

Add Paragraphs to Section VI A (7) as follows: 

7. Neighborhood Business District 

(a) For retail or consumer service establishments, one space for each 
200 square feet of usable floor area. 

(b) For office or professional establishments, one space for each 
400 square feet of usable area. 

(c) For gasoline service stations, one space for each employee on 
the principal work shift plus two spaces for each service bay or 
300 square feet of interior service space. 

Add Paragraph to Section VI B (3f) as follows: 

3. Permitted Signs 

f. Neighborhood Business District 

(1) As permitted in a residential area. 

(2) Signs flush with the wall of the building advertising the name 
of the firm or the goods or services available on the premises; 
said sign not to exceed a total of 18 square feet. 

(3) One free standing sign not to exceed 12 feet in height listing 
the names of the establishments located in the district, each 
face of said sign not to exceed 25 square feet. 

Add Paragraph to Section VI C (3) as follows: 

3. In all neighborhood shopping districts the buildings and parking 
areas shall be screened from the abutting residential districts by fir or 



79 



pine trees which will be installed by the owner and shall be to a height of 
at least ten feet, said trees to be kept in good order and bad or diseased 
trees to be replaced when required by the Building Inspector of the Town of 
Andover on the advice of the Andover Tree Department; a perimeter grassed 
or garden area shall be kept and maintained to a depth of at least twenty 
feet on the premises so zoned along the residential boundary lines. 

On petition of James G. Newall and others. 

Article 34 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to rezone from Single Residence A Zone 
to Apartment District Zone a parcel of land bounded and described as follows: 

Being lots 128, 104, 104E and 89 all as shown on Assessors' Map Number 19, 
presently on file with the Board of Assessors of the Town of Andover, Massachusetts, 
more specifically bounded as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the westerly side of High Street at the southeasterly 
corner of land now or formerly of Williams; thence proceeding southerly 1,110 feet 
to lot 127 as shown on said plan; thence proceeding westerly 320 feet to lot 104D 
as shown on said plan; thence proceeding northerly by lots 104D, 104C, 104B and 
104A, 525 feet more or less to lot 104 as shown on said plan; thence proceeding 
northerly 50 feet more or less to a point at the northeasterly corner of said lot 
88; thence proceeding westerly 90 feet more or less by the northerly line of lot 88 
to lot 93 as shown on said plan; thence proceeding further northerly 245 feet more 
or less to lot 90 as shown on said plan; thence proceeding easterly 100 feet more or 
less to lot 104E as shown on said plan; thence proceeding northerly 300 feet by lots 
90 and 91 as shown on said plan to the southerly line of Haverhill Street; thence 
turning and running easterly 40 feet by the southerly line of Haverhill Street to 
lot 137 as shown on said plan; thence turning and running southerly 200 feet by the 
westerly line of lot 137 to lot 104 as shown on said plan; thence turning and run- 
ning easterly 424 feet by lots 137 and 132 inclusive to a point; thence turning and 
running northerly 220 feet by the easterly line of lot 132 to Haverhill Street; 
thence proceeding northeasterly by the southerly line of Haverhill Street 40 feet 
to lot 131 as shown on said plan; thence proceeding southerly 220 feet by the west- 
erly line of lot 131 to a point; thence proceeding easterly 250 feet by lot 129 to 
the westerly line of High Street and the point of beginning, on petition of Arthur 
A. Collins and others. 

Article 35 was defeated. The Vote — YES 225, NO 299, less than the 2/3 required. 
A favorable report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Sheehy. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,000,000 or any other sum, to construct a water treatment plant with all neces- 
sary appurtenances, including original equipment therefor, at Haggetts Pond, such 
appropriation to be in addition to the amount appropriated for the same purpose 
under Article 26 at the 1970 Annual Town Meeting, and to determine whether such sum 
shall be raised by taxation, by borrowing, by transfer, including transfer of the 
unexpended balance of the proceeds of a loan authorized and issued pursuant to the 
vote adopted under Article 11 at the 1965 Annual Town Meeting, or otherwise and 
further, to see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court for the passage 
of any special law required to authorize and validate any action taken or vote 
adopted pursuant to this Article, or take any other action relative to the foregoing 
matters. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of one 
million dollars to construct a water treatment plant with all necessary appurten- 
ances, including original equipment therefor, at Haggetts Pond, such appropriation 
to be in addition to the amount appropriated for the same purpose under Article 26 
at the 1970 Annual Town Meeting; that to meet such appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, be hereby authorized to issue and sell bonds 
or notes of the Town, at one time, or from time to time, not exceeding in principal 



80 



amount, the sum of one million dollars, pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8 (4) of the 
General Laws as amended, and supplemented, each issue of such bonds or notes to be 
payable in not more than twenty years from its date. 

It was further moved that the Town petition the General Court for the passage of 

any law which will allow the Town to use for this purpose, the balance of funds 

held by the Town from the borrowing authorized by vote adopted under Article 11 of 
the 1965 Annual Town Meeting. 

It was further moved that if such authorization is received prior to September 1, 
1971, those funds be applied to reduce the aggregate amount of funds borrowed under 
this article. 

The Vote — YES 511, NO 8 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A quorum was present. 
A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to thank Mr. Frank J. Catalano for his 
second generous gift of land to the Town of approximately 6 acres of land off Car- 
dinal Lane to be held and used by the Town for conservation purposes. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 37 as printed in the 
warrant . 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $18,700 to the Conservation Fund, this being the amount received from the State 
Self-Help Fund in reimbursement of a portion of the purchase price of the Garabedian 
property, none of such amount so transferred to be spent without the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town transfer from available 
funds the sum of $18,700 to the Conservation Fund, this being the amount received 
from the State Self-Help Fund in reimbursement of a portion of the purchase price of 
the Garabedian property, none of such amount so transferred to be spent without the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen and a vote of Town Meeting. 

The Vote — YES 251, NO 213. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $35,000 to the Conservation Fund, this being the amount received from the State 
Self-Help Fund in reimbursement of a portion of the purchase price of the Shlakis 
property, none of such amount so transferred to be spent without the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town transfer from available 
funds the sum of $35,000 to the Conservation Fund, this being the amount received 
from the State Self-Help Fund in reimbursement of a portion of the purchase price of 
the Shlakis property, none of such amount so transferred to be spent without the ap- 
proval of the Board of Selectmen and a vote of Town Meeting. 

The Vote — YES 247, NO 216. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will appropriate $65,000 for the construction of 
sewer mains in Lupine Road and Central Street and to determine whether such sum will 
be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by a com- 
bination thereof. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the town appropriate $65,000 for the 
construction of sewer lines in Lupine Road and Central Street and to meet that appro- 
priation the sum of $15,000 be transferred from funds appropriated under Article 41 



of the Warrant of the annual Town Meeting of 1970 and the sum of $16,855 be trans- 
ferred from funds appropriated under Article 16 of the Warrant of the annual Town 
Meeting of 1968 and the balance of $33,145 be raised by taxation and it was further 
moved that betterments be assessed. 

The Vote — YES 335, NO 60. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by 
Harold King, Chairman. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $80,000 or any other 
sum, for the construction of a Sanitary Sewer connecting the Ballardvale Sewerage 
Treatment Plant to the town sewerage system and to determine whether such appropri- 
ation shall be raised by taxation, by transfer of available funds, by borrowing or 
by a combination of the foregoing, and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the 
necessary easements by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 
The persons whose lands would be affected are supposed to be: 

Assessors' Map 138, Lot 23C - C. Lincoln Giles 
Assessors' Map 138, Lot 24A - Shawsheen Rubber Company 
Assessors' Map 138, Lot 24 - Shawsheen Rubber Company 

on petition of Harold R. Rafton and others. 

Article 41 was withdrawn. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was VOTED at 
10:50 P. M. to adjourn the meeting until Monday, March 29, 1971 at 7:30 P. M. in 
the Memorial Auditorium. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 29, 1971 

The meeting was called to order at 7:30 P. M. by Arthur Williams, Moderator, 
having been adjourned from March 25, 1971 at 10:50 P. M. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 708 persons admitted to the 
meeting. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit twenty non-voters, two of whom wished to 
address the meeting. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a Public Way 
"Glenwood Road" as approved by the Planning Board as shown on a plan entitled 
"Subdivision and Acceptance Plan" "Morningside", Subdivider "Magee Construction Co., 
Inc." Engineer "Fred A. Joyce" Dated, Feb. 10, 1964; Scale, 1"=40' recorded in Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds "Land Court, Book 38, Page 153". Copies of said 
plan and description of said road being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of 
John E. Magee and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept as a Public Way "Glenwood Road" 
from County Road to Morningside Drive as approved by the Planning Board as shown on 
a plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan" "Morningside", Subdivider "Magee 
Construction Co., Inc." Engineer "Fred A. Joyce" Dated, Feb. 10, 1964; Scale, 
1"=40' recorded in Essex North District Registry of Deeds "Land Court, Book 38, 
Page 153". Copies of said plan and description of said road being on file with the 
Town Clerk. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 



82 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a Public Way 
Sleepy Hollow Lane as approved by the Planning Board as shown on a plan entitled 
"Subdivision and Acceptance Plan" "Morningside" Subdivider "Magee Construction Co. , 
Inc." Engineer "Fred A. Joyce" Dated, Feb. 10, 1964; Scale 1"=40' recorded in Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds "Land Court Book 38, Page 153". Copies of said 
plan and description of said road being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of 
John E. Magee and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 43 as printed in the 
warrant . 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a Public Way 
Morningside Drive as approved by the Planning Board as shown on a plan entitled 
"Subdivision and Acceptance Plan "Morningside" Subdivider "Magee Construction Co. , 
Inc." Engineer "Fred A. Joyce" Dated, Feb. 10, 1964; Scale 1"=40' recorded in Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds "Land Court Book 38, Page 153". Copies of said 
plan and description of said road being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of 
John E. Magee and others. 

Article 44 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept as a Public Way 
Clover Circle as approved by the Planning Board as shown on a plan entitled "Sub- 
division and Acceptance Plan" "Morningside" Subdivider "Magee Construction Co., Inc." 
Engineer "Fred A. Joyce" Dated, Feb. 10, 1964; Scale 1"=40' recorded in Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds "Land Court Book 38, Page 153". Copies of said plan and 
description of said road being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of John E. 
Magee and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 45 as printed in the 
Warrant . 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by William E. Haskell. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds, or by borrowing, or by any combination of the fore- 
going, the sum of $50,000 for the purpose of installing road drains and authorize 
the Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by purchase, by gift or by seizure 
by right of eminent domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 46 as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $50,000 from taxation. 

The Vote — YES 427, NO 5 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Sheehy. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($25,000.00) for drainage improvements in the 
area of William Street and the southerly portions of Yale, George and Dartmouth Roads 
in Shawsheen Heights and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by necessary 
easements therefore, by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain, 
over portions of William Street, on petition of Nicholas Grieco and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise by taxation the sum of Twenty- 
five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) for drainage improvements in the area of William 
Street and the southerly portions of Yale, George and Dartmouth Roads in Shawsheen 
Heights and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by necessary easements 
therefore, by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain, over por- 
tions of William Street. Construction of this project shall not commence until an 
agreement is reached with Nicholas Grieco to the effect that Mr. Grieco will, at his 
expense, extend the drain to be constructed under this article to Hussey's Brook and 
provide the Town with the necessary temporary and permanent easements without charge 
to the Town. 

83 



The Vote — YES 495, NO 35 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Sheehy. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from general funds, taxa- 
tion or any other source, the sum of $10,000 to the Greater Lawrence Community Drug 
Council for the implementation of an expanded approach to meet the community drug 
problem, on petition of J. Everett Bodge and others. 

Article 48 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$9,500.00 for planning studies of a connector road between Route 93 and Lawrence, 
and access roads in the Andover Industrial Areas. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 49 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $9,500 from taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to convey to 
C. Lincoln Giles and Janice Giles or their nominee, the fee in approximately 18,000 
square feet of land westerly of Olde Andover Village in return for a waiver of a 
claim for damages against the Town resulting from the taking by the Town by right of 
eminent domain of a gravel pit of C. Lincoln Giles on or about October 27, 1970, on 
petition of Romeo C. King and others. 

Article 50 was defeated. The Vote — YES 15, NO 469. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to open certain lands owned by it and 
held in the hands of the Conservation Commission or otherwise during the hunting 
season in the fall of each year to residents of the town only, who are duly licensed 
to hunt as may be certified to by the Town Clerk for Hunting under the State Law in 
season, as established by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts through the Department 
of Natural Resources Division of Fisheries and Game, and subject to any town of 
Andover Bylaws presently in force and effect in regard to Hunting and the discharge 
of firearms, on petition of Thomas W. Sutton and others. 

Article 51 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$6,500 for a set of aerial photographs of the Town. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 52 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $6,500 from taxation. 

A voluntary report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chair- 
man. 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to change from a Single Residence B 
District to a General Business District the following parcel of land: 

Beginning at a point on the Northerly side of Haverhill Street at the Southwester- 
ly corner of land now or formerly of the Augustinian College of the Merrimack Valley; 
thence running along said northerly line of Haverhill Street 804 feet, more or less, 
to a stone bound at land now or formerly of Angelo R. Cataldo; thence turning and 
running northeasterly by said land of Cataldo 546 feet, more or less, to a point at 
the town line of North Andover, said point being 629.1 feet, more or less, distant 
easterly from the easterly line of High Street; thence turning and running South- 
easterly 740 feet, more or less, to a point at said land now or formerly of the 
Augustinian College of the Merrimack Valley; thence turning and running southeaster- 
ly 125 feet, more or less by said land of the Augustinian College of the Merri- 
mack Valley to said Haverhill Street at the point of beginning. 

Containing 6 acres, more or less. On petition of Michael A. Gravallese, Jr. and 
others. 

84 



Article 53 was defeated. The Vote — YES 313, NO 296 — less than the 2/3 vote re- 
quired. 

A favorable report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman. 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$4,900 for leasing and operating a drop-in center. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 54 be approved in the amount 
of $4,900 from taxation for leasing and operating a drop-in center, no funds to be 
spent for rehabilitation of the building and all funds to be expended through the 
Recreation Department. 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $2,200 for the purpose of constructing a parking area at the West Andover 
Community Center on North Street. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 55 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $2,200 from taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman. 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $4,000.00 to lay out and construct the parking area from the rear of the Town 
Hall to Bartlet Street including bituminous concrete paving, berms and lines. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 56 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $4,000 from taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Sheehy. 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote taken under Article 
37 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 8, 1970, by adding to the parcels of land 
authorized for acquisition for conservation purposes under G. L., Chapter 40, Sec- 
tion 8c, the following parcel of land: 

4. Lot 10 of Assessors' Map 126 supposed to be owned by Joseph S. Cyr 
and Julius J. Sasso of the Joseph S. Cyr Trust and lying along the 
Merrimack River and the Lawrence-Andover city and town line, con- 
taining 32 acres, more or less. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town amend the vote taken under 
Article 37 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 8, 1970 by adding to the parcels of 
land authorized for acquisition for conservation purposes under G. L., Chapter 40, 
Section 8c, the following parcel of land: 

4. All or part of Lot 10 Assessors' Map 126 formerly owned by Joseph S. 
Cyr and Julius J. Sasso of the Joseph S. Cyr Trust and now supposed 
to be owned by Roland G. Langlois, lying along the Merrimack River 
and the Lawrence-Andover city and town line, containing 32 acres, 
more or less. 

The Vote — YES 360, NO 27 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Margaret R. Keck, Secretary. 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commission 
to acquire for conservation purposes under G. L., Chap. 40, Sec. 8C, as amended or 
as hereafter further amended, by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain, an easement to coincide with the water easement for the Fish Brook water 
line, from River Road upstream to the boundary of the Boloian property (Lot 4 of 
Assessors' Map 170) and the A. V. I. S. property, comprising portions of the follow- 
ing parcels of land: 

85 



1. Lot 2 of Assessors' Map 189, supposed to be owned by Walter A. 
and Alice Disbrow: 

2. Lot 3 of Assessors' Map 189, supposed to be owned by Ernest and 
Bette Henderson; 

3. Lot 5 of Assessors' Map 189, supposed to be owned by Walter A. 
and Alice Disbrow; 

4. Lot 2 of Assessors' Map 146, supposed to be owned by John Boloian; 

5. Lot 4 of Assessors' Map 170, supposed to be owned by John Boloian; 

said easement to be for the benefit of the Town and its inhabitants to pass and re- 
pass on foot, or horseback or by snowmobiles or unmotorized bicycles, said acquisi- 
tion to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Article 58 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to acquire by seizure by right of emin- 
ent domain for Conservation purposes under G. L. Chapter 40, Section 8C, as amended, 
or as hereafter further amended, all or part of Lot 3 of Assessors' Map 121 sup- 
posed to be owned by John L. Cyr and Grace L. Cyr, off Woburn Street and to expend 
therefor a sum not exceeding $40,320 out of the $100,000 appropriated under Article 
37 of the Annual Town Meeting of March, 1970 or out of the Conservation Fund or out 
of both. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Article 59 was defeated. The Vote — YES 120, NO 248 — less than 2/3 vote as re- 
quired. 

A favorable report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Margaret Keck, Sec- 
retary. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Fredric S. O'Brien and duly seconded, it was 
VOTED at 11:20 P. M. to adjourn the meeting until Monday, April 5, 1971 at 7:30 P.M. 
in the Memorial Auditorium. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 5, 1971 

The meeting was called to order at 7:30 P. M. by Arthur Williams, Moderator, 
having been adjourned from March 29, 1971 at 11:20 P. M. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 1039 persons admitted to the 
meeting. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit thirty-two non-voters, one of whom wished 
to address the meeting. 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$20,000 for the construction of a multi-purpose area in the Recreation Park. 

Inserted at the request of the Recreation Advisory Committee. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 60 be approved as printed 
in the warrant in the amount of $20,000 from taxation. 

86 



A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Margaret Keck. 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$5,000 for the construction of Dike #3 at Pomps Pond as shown on a plan prepared 
for the Conservation Commission by the Essex Conservation District in September, 
1969, on petition of Robert M. Henderson and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 61 as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $5,000 by taxation. The Vote — YES 397, NO 236. A report 
of the Andover Planning Board was read by Margaret Keck. 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town of 
Andover by adding thereto the following: 

ARTICLE 13. 



Section 1. In order to protect the health and welfare of the residents of 
the Town of Andover and to inhibit the accumulation of waste materials in 
the Andover dump and the steady degradation of the natural environment of 
the Town of Andover, the sale of certain non-returnable or disposable bever- 
age containers as herein defined is hereby prohibited within the corporate 
limits of the Town of Andover. 

Section 2. Definitions 

For the purposes of this by-law, the following terms, phrases, words and 
their derivations shall have the meaning given herein: 

a. Beverage (s) shall mean: 

1. Non-alcoholic beverages - any mineral waters, soda waters, or any 
other carbonated or uncarbonated beverage not containing alcohol that is 
commonly known as a soft drink. 

2. Alcoholic beverage - any beer, ale or other malt beverage bottled 
in the continental United States containing one-half of one per centum or 
more of alcohol by volume. 

b. Town shall mean the corporate limits of the Town of Andover 

c. Town Manager shall mean the Town Manager of the Town of Andover, or 
his designee. 

d. Container shall mean any device made of glass or metal material used 
for the purpose of holding or containing either soft drinks or beer. 

e. Non-returnable or disposable beverage container shall mean any device 
made of glass or metal material used for the purpose of holding or 
containing either soft drinks or beer and the title to which the seller 
intends to pass with the sale of the contents. 

f. Sale shall mean a commercial transaction by any person, firm, individu- 
al, corporation, partnership or vendor whereby beverages are exchanged 
for a monetary consideration. 

Section 3. Enforcement 

Upon receipt by the Town Manager of a complaint alleging violation of the 
provisions of this by-law, the Town Manager shall investigate such com- 
plaint and if a violation of this by-law is found, he shall institute on 
behalf of the Town appropriate legal action for the enforcement of this 
by-law. 

Section 4. Violations 

Any firm, individual, corporation, partnership or vendor selling beverages 

87 



within the Town, found guilty of violating any provision of this by-law, 
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine, not 
exceeding one hundred dollars ($100.00). Each day's violation of the 
provisions of this by-law shall constitute a separate offense. 

Section 5. Severability 

The provisions of this by-law are hereby declared to be severable and if 
any provision, sentence, clause, section or part thereof is held illegal, 
invalid, unconstitutional or inapplicable to any person or circumstance, 
such illegality, invalidity, unconstitutionality or inapplicability 
shall not affect or impair any of the remaining provisions, sentences, 
clauses, sections or parts of this by-law or their application to persons 
and circumstances. 

Section 6. Effective Date 

This by-law shall take effect at the expiration of sixty (60) calendar 
days following its passage. Provisions of this act shall apply to all 
sales of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages as defined herein, made 
after April 1, 1972. 

On petition of Elaine Katz and others. 

Article 62 was defeated. The Vote — YES 441-NO 538. 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, 
Donald Circle, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled, "Chandler Acres, Subdivision and 
Acceptance Plan" owned by Walter D. Belisle and Robert O. Rabenius, dated June 23, 
1966, Engineer, Dana F. Perkins & Sons, Inc., 270 Main Street, Reading, Mass., and 
shown as Plan No. 5540, North Essex District Registry of Deeds, plan and description 
along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements on file with the Town Clerk, on 
petition of George K. Chongris and others. 

Article 63 was not acted upon. 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, a 
portion of Launching Road, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled, "River Ridge Estates, 
sect. 2", owned by J. C. Ryan Construction Inc., dated February 23, 1967, Engineer, 
Pembroke Land Survey and Realty Company, P. 0. Box 205, Salem, New Hampshire, and 
shown as Plan No. 5722, North Essex District Registry of Deeds, plan and description 
along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements on file with the Town Clerk, 
on petition of George K. Chongris and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 64 as printed in the 
warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by William Haskell. 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name Mill Stone Circle as 
approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen as 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, dated May 5, 1970, Dana A. Per- 
kins and Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers and Surveyors and shown as Plan No. 6289, 
North Essex District Registry of Deeds; plan and description along with necessary 
deeds on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Neal L. Mitton and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 65 as printed in the 
Warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by William Haskell. 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name En- 
field Drive only so far as has been approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, 
Mass. dated May 5, 1970, Dana A. Perkins and Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers and Sur- 
veyors and shown as Plan No. 6289 North Essex District Registry of Deeds; plan and 
description along with necessary deeds on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of 
Neal L. Mitton and others. 

88 



On motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 66 as printed in the war- 
rant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by William Haskell. 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways and name Ivy 
Lane and College Circle as approved by the Planning Board, as shown on a plan en- 
titled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, Ivy Lane, College Circle, Wildwood, Section 
II, Winchester Development Corp.", dated September, 1964, 2 sheets, recorded in the 
Essex North District Registry of Deeds as plan #5210, said plan and description for 
recording purposes being on file with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 67 as printed in the 
Warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by William Haskell. 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Joseph Street, as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled "North Center Acres", owned by Joseph S. & 
Marie D. Pappalardo; approved May, 1964, Eng. Charles E. Cyr, said plan being record- 
ed in the North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #5120. Plan and description, along 
with all necessary papers for recording purposes being on file with the Town Clerk, 
on the petition of Joseph S. Pappalardo and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 68 as printed in the 
Warrant. A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by William Haskell. 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept and name as a pub- 
lic way, Matthew Street, as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled "North Center Acres", owned by Joseph S. 
& Marie D. Pappalardo; approved May, 1964, Eng. Charles E. Cyr, said plan being 
recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #5120. Plan and description, 
along with all necessary papers for recording purposes being on file with the Town 
Clerk, on the petition of Joseph S. Pappalardo and others. 

Article 69 was not acted upon. 

ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $1,900,500 or any other 
sum for the construction, original equipping and furnishing of an addition to the 
Doherty School and for the remodeling, reconstruction or making of extraordinary re- 
pairs to said Doherty School and to determine whether such appropriation shall be 
raised by taxation, by transfer of available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, and 
to authorize the Selectmen to acquire by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain such temporary construction and permanent easements as may be neces- 
sary for drainage purposes over lands supposed to belong to - 

Charles F. and Jeanie S. Dalton 
Willard H. and Mary L. Currier 
Joseph A. and Sheila LaMontagne 
Harriet W. Cowdery 
John Avery , Jr . 

or take any other action relative to the foregoing matters. 

No action was taken. 

ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate $70,000 for the purpose of retaining the services of 
an architect to prepare preliminary plans, working drawings, and bid specifications 
for the construction of an addition to the Andover High School. 

Inserted at the request of the School Committee. 

Article 71 was defeated. The Vote — YES 431, NO 484. 

A favorable report on this article was read by Margaret Keck of the Andover Plan- 
ning Board. 



89 



ARTICLE 


19, 


1965 


ARTICLE 


8, 


1967 


ARTICLE 


7A, 


1968 


ARTICLE 


33, 


1968 


ARTICLE 


IB, 


1969 


ARTICLE 


17, 


1969 


ARTICLE 


22, 


1969 


ARTICLE 


16, 


1970 


ARTICLE 


18, 


1970 


ARTICLE 


73. 


To 



ARTICLE 72. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the treasury. 

On motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the following balances be lapsed and 
returned to Surplus Revenue : 

Water Storage Haggetts $ 1,000.00 

North St. Reconstruction 7.54 

Drainage Osgood Street 80.49 

Damages — Burtt Road 6.00 

Overtime Fire Dept. 2,160.90 

M B T A Contract 282.34 

Aerial Fire Truck 199.00 

Shawsheen School Renovations 22.10 

High School Windows 315.00 

To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use 
in Free Cash to reduce the 1971 tax rate and to offset appropriations voted at the 
1971 Town Meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to permit the Assessors to use $800,000 
in Free Cash to reduce the 1971 tax rate and to offset appropriations voted at the 
1971 Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 74. To act upon the report of the TOWN OFFICERS. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the annual report of the Town Offi- 
cers as printed in the annual town report be accepted and placed on file. 

At this time, Article 9 was reconsidered. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $2,500 and to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a one year contract 
with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and to use said sum or any part 
thereof to defray deficits of the railroad resulting from providing commuter service 
from Andover to Boston. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $2,500 from taxation. 

ARTICLE 75. To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

Upon motion made by Gerald Silverman and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the 
Moderator appoint a Committee to study Representative Town Meeting and report back 
to the Special Town Meeting in October. The Vote — YES 473, NO 332. 

Upon motion made by Karl Haartz and duly seconded, it was VOTED that this Town 
Meeting extend its thanks and good wishes to retired Selectman William Stewart for 
his good and faithful service during the past ten years to the Town and further: 
that this Town Meeting afford to Selectman Stewart a place of honor at all official 
functions to be observed at the coming 325th Anniversary Celebration of Andover ' s 
Founding. 

Mr. Richard J. Bowen personally thanked Town Counsel Fredric S. Brien for his 
untiring efforts in behalf of the Town for many years. A standing ovation was given 
Mr. O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED at 10:20 P. M. that the regular 
meeting be adjourned and act on the warrant for the Special Town Meeting. 



90 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 5, 1971 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to dispense with the reading of 
the warrant and the return of service of the Constable. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $2,390,000 or any other 
sum for the construction, original equipping and furnishing of an addition to the 
Doherty School and for the remodeling, reconstruction or making of extra-ordinary 
repairs to said Doherty School and to determine whether such appropriation shall 
be raised by taxation, by transfer of available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, 
and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire by purchase, by gift or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain such temporary construction and permanent easements as may 
be necessary for drainage purposes over lands supposed to belong to: 

Charles F. and Jeanie S. Dalton 
Willard H. and Mary L. Currier 
Joseph A. and Sheila LaMontagne 
Harriet W. Cowdery 
John Avery, Jr. 

or take any other action relative to the foregoing matters. 

Article 1 was defeated — The VOTE — YES 484, NO 347 — less than the 2/3 vote re- 
quired. 

A minority report of the Finance Committee was read by Mr. Francis J. Byrne. 

A favorable report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chair- 
man. 

ARTICLE 2. To transact any other business that may legally come before the meet- 
ing. 

At this time, Chairman Watters of the Board of Selectmen extended his thanks and 
the thanks of the Town to the Building Committee for the time and effort spent in 
behalf of the addition to the Doherty School. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 12:15 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



Elden R. Salter 
Town Clerk 



91 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 4, 1971 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, August 30, 1971, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs met and assembled in the 
Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street on Monday, the fourth day of October, 1971 at 
7:30 P. M. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:40 P. M. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 708 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

Opening prayer was offered by Father Joseph F. Gill of Saint Augustine's Church. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman George Heseltine. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit forty students from Phillips Academy and 
seventeen other non-voters, five of whom wished to address the meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the reading of the warrant 
and the return of service of the Constable be dispensed with, and that the Moderator 
refer to the articles by number. 

ESSEX, SS. October 4, 1971 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court for the pas- 
sage of any special law necessary to place the employees of the Town working at 
Spring Grove Cemetery, except the superintendent, under Civil Service. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 1 as printed in the war- 
rant. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VII (Building Code) Sec- 
tion 10 by adding the following new paragraph: 

No permit for the erection of a swimming pool, either excavated or above 
ground, shall be issued until a wiring permit to a licensed electrician has 
first been obtained to assure the proper grounding of the pool in accordance 
with the National Electrical Code, Massachusetts Electrical Code and the 
rules and regulations of the Andover Electrical Inspector. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to amend Article VII (Building Code) Sec- 
tion 10 by adding the following new paragraph: 

No permit for the erection of a swimming pool, either excavated or above 
ground, shall be issued until a wiring permit to a licensed electrician has 
first been obtained to assure the proper grounding of the pool in accordance 
with the National Electrical Code, Massachusetts Electrical Code and the 

92 



rules and regulations of the Andover Electrical Inspector. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mrs. James Keck. A quorum was 
present. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VII (Building Code) by 
adding a new section numbered 50A as follows: 

Section 50A : 



Swimming pool permits are required for all swimming and wading pools whether 
excavated or above ground, with the exception of portable pools of less than 
eight feet in greatest horizontal dimension, and with the capability of re- 
taining a depth of no more than one foot of water. The latter pools need no 
permit. 

A five foot fence with safety gate is required. Above ground pools with 
five foot walls or fences equipped with removable ladders need not be fenced, 

An electrical permit and permit from the Board of Health shall be secured 
before a swimming pool permit is issued. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to amend Article VII (Building Code) by 
adding a new section numbered 50A as follows: 

Section 50A: 



Swimming pool permits are required for all swimming and wading pools whether 
excavated or above ground, with the exception of portable pools of less than 
eight feet in greatest horizontal dimension, and with the capability of re- 
taining a depth of no more than one foot of water. The latter pools need no 
permit. 

A five foot fence or wall with safety gate is required. Above ground pools 
with five foot walls or fences equipped with removable ladders need not be 
fenced. 

An electrical permit and permit from the Board of Health shall be secured 
before a swimming pool permit is issued. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mrs. James Keck. A quorum was 
present . 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, 
by adding a new Paragraph 22 to Section II, Definitions, as follows: 

22. Swimming Pools 

All swimming and wading pools whether excavated or above ground, with 
the exception of portable pools of less than 8 feet in diameter, or 
in greatest horizontal dimension, and with the capability of retain- 
ing a depth of no more than one foot of water, are required to have 
permits. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it. was VOTED to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, 
by adding a new Paragraph 22 to Section II, Definitions, as follows: 

22. Swimming Pools 

All swimming and wading pools whether excavated or above ground, with 
the exception of portable pools of less than 8 feet in diameter, or 
in greatest horizontal dimension, and with the capability of retain- 
ing a depth of no more than one foot of water, are required to have 
permits. 

93 



The Vote-YES 438, NO 28 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A report of the Ando- 
ver Planning Board was read by Mrs. James Keck. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw (Article VIII), 
Section IV. B. (Use Regulations) Paragraph 40 by deleting the word "permanent". 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to amend the Zoning Bylaw (Article VIII), 
Section IV. B. (Use Regulations) Paragraph 40 by deleting the word "permanent" and 
by adding a new sentence at the end of Paragraph 40 to read as follows: "See Arti- 
cle VII (Bldg. Code) Sec. 50A for exception". 

The Vote-YES 464, NO 16 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A report of the Ando- 
ver Planning Board was read by Mrs. James Keck. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$150,000, or any other sum, to construct a water treatment plant with all necessary 
appurtenances, including original equipment therefor, at Haggetts Pond, such appro- 
priation to be in addition to the amounts appropriated for the same purpose under 
Article 36 at the 1971 Annual Town Meeting and under Article 26 at the 1970 Annual 
Town Meeting, and to determine whether such sum shall be raised by taxation, by 
borrowing, by transfer from available funds or take any other action relative to 
the foregoing matters. 

Upon motion made by Chairman Watters of the Board of Selectmen and duly seconded, 
it was VOTED unanimously that the sum of $150,000 be hereby appropriated to con- 
struct a water treatment plant with all necessary appurtenances, including original 
equipment therefor, at Haggetts Pond, such appropriation to be in addition to the 
amount appropriated for the same purpose under Article 36 at the 1971 Annual Town 
Meeting and under Article 26 at the 1970 Annual Town Meeting, and to meet said ap- 
propriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is hereby authorized 
to issue and sell bonds or notes of the Town not exceeding in principal amount the 
sum of $150,000 pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8(4), of the General Laws as amended 
and supplemented, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more than 
twenty (20) years from its date. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. The Andover Fi- 
nance Committee unanimously approved this article. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commission 
to expend from the Conservation fund the sum of $5,100 to acquire for conservation 
purposes under G. L. , c 40, s. 8C, as it now reads or may be hereafter amended, the 
fee of the following described land: 

Lot 5 of Assessors' Map 189, supposed to be owned by Walter and Alice Disbrow. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 7 be approved as printed in 
the warrant . 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II, Section 3, of its 
By-Laws to establish a quorum for Town Meetings at 5% of the registered voters so 
that said Section 3 will read as follows: 

Section 3. Quorum : Except as to such parts of the Annual Town Meeting as 
are devoted exclusively to the election of town officers, 5% of 
the registered voters of the Town as of January 1 of the year 
in which the Town Meeting is held shall be necessary to consti- 
tute a quorum for the transaction of business at any Annual or 
Special Town Meeting; but less than a quorum may vote to adjourn 
indefinitely or to adjourn from time to time, and any business 

94 



which might have been transacted at the meeting originally 
called may be transacted at an adjourned meeting. 

Article 8 was defeated. 

At this point, Town Counsel O'Brien requested the moderator to return to Article 
6 for the vote. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, 
Section VI. C. 2 (c) (Landscaping) by adding the words "and rivers" so as to read: 
(c) abutting limited access highways and rivers, in addition, etc. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 
Article VIII, Section VI. C. 2 (c) (Landscaping) by adding the words "and rivers" so 
as to read: (c) abutting limited access highways and rivers, in addition, etc. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. A quorum was 
present. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate by transfer 
from available funds the sum of $13,500 to engage consultants to make a comparative 
study of means of access to the Lowell Junction Industrial area and to make recom- 
mendations based upon the relative merits and estimated costs of the various alter- 
natives. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 10 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant and it was further moved that no funds be expended until the Town Mana- 
ger, Selectmen, and Planning Board investigate, to determine if any Federal or State 
Funds may be available for this project; and if such funds are available, they be 
used before the funds appropriated under this article. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King. The Andover 
Finance Committee approved this article. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw as follows: 

AMEND the Bylaw by adding the following new definitions to Section II; 

22. Cluster Condominium Development : A development of town house dwellings 
in a Cluster Condominium District, owned in condominium and subject to 
the limitations of Sections V. B. 11 and VI. H. of this Bylaw. 

23. Condominium Dwelling, Condominium Unit : As defined by Chapter 183A of 
the General Laws. 

24. Town Houses: A type of multiple dwelling, containing dwelling units, in 
which both side walls of each dwelling unit, except for the end dwelling 
units, are party walls, in which each dwelling unit has its own direct 
entrance from the outside, and in which each dwelling unit has at least 
two outside walls. 

AMEND Section III. A. 1, Classes of Districts, by adding the following new 
classification: 

CC - CLUSTER CONDOMINIUM 

AMEND Section IV. B. , Use Regulations, by adding a new reference entitled CC 
(Cluster Condominium) and its application to the number paragraphs as 
follows: 



95 



Paragraph 1 . 

Paragraph 2. 

Paragraph 3. 

Paragraph 4. 

Paragraph 4. A (add new Par.) Town House in 
a Cluster Condominium Development, subject 
to the limitations in Sections V.B.10 and VI. H. 

Paragraph 5. 

Paragraph 6. 

Paragraph 7 . 

Paragraph 8. 

Paragraph 9 . 

Paragraph 10. 



reference 



Y(Yes) 
N(No) 

N(No) 
N(No) 



N(No) 
Y(Yes) 

N(No) 

N(No) 

N(No) 

SP 
(Special Permit) 



Paragraph 10 s and add the following words at end of Paragraph "provided that the 
area involved in this use is not part of the 'open space' area in a Cluster Condo- 
minium Development . " 



Paragraphs 11, through 30. " 

Paragraphs 31, through 34A. " 

Paragraph 34B. " 

Paragraph 35. " 

Paragraph 36. " 

Paragraph 37. " 

Paragraph 37. Add the same words at end of Par. 37 as contained 
in Par. 10 above. 

Paragraph 38. " 

Paragraph 39. " 

Paragraph 40. " 

Paragraph 41. " 

Paragraph 41. Add the same words at end of Par. 41 as contained 
in Par. 10 above. 

Paragraph 42. " 

Paragraph 43. " 

Paragraph 44. " 

Paragraph 45. " 



N(No) 

SP 
(Special Permit) 

Y(Yes) 

N(No) 

Y(Yes) 

SP 
(Special Permit) 



N(No) 

N(No) 

Y(Yes) 

SP 
(Special Permit) 



N(No) 
N(No) 
Y(Yes) 

N(No) 



96 



Paragraph 46. reference SP 

(Special Permit) 
Paragraph 47. Y(Yes) 

AMEND Section V. A., Table of Dimensional Requirements, by inserting the following 
new District: 



CC 
Cluster Condominium 



Minimum Lot 
Area 



Dimensions 
Frontage 



Minimum Yard Depth 
Front Side Rear 



See V. B. 
Par. 10 

Max . Hgt . 
# Stories 

35' 
2g Stories 



180" 



See V. B. 
Par. 10b. 



Coverage 



20% 



AMEND Section V. B. , Exceptions and Special Requirements by adding a new Paragraph 
#10 as follows: 

10. a. The minimum gross area of a Cluster Condominium Development shall be 
at least 25 contiguous acres. 

b. All buildings, structures and pavement other than access ways shall 
be set back not less than 60' from any lot line or way bounding the 
development . 

AMEND Section VI. A., Other Requirements, Parking, by adding a new Paragraph 7 as 
follows: 

7. Cluster Condominium Development. There shall be at least two parking 
spaces per dwelling unit. 

AMEND Section VI. C, Other Requirements, Landscaping, by adding a new Paragraph 3 
as follows: 

3. In cluster condominium, landscaping shall be provided in the open area 
between any intensively developed area (such as building, parking lots, 
recreational areas, etc.) and a public way bounding the development. 
Similarly where the development borders on individual single residence 
lots, landscaping shall be provided. Except in the case of features 
such as parking facilities, which are in the opinion of the Planning 
Board, visually objectionable, the landscaping is not required to pro- 
vide complete screening, but should be sufficient to break up the lines 
of buildings and otherwise improve the esthetics of the view. The 
amount of landscaping should be inversely proportional to the distance 
of an intensively developed area to the development border. The land- 
scaping plans shall be submitted to the Planning Board for approval and 
shall become a part of the building permit application for the develop- 
ment. 

AMEND Section VI, Other Requirements, by adding a new Paragraph H, outlined as fol- 
lows: 

H. Cluster Condominium Development 

1. Planning Board Review 

The Planning Board shall review the plans for a Cluster Condominium 
Development under Subdivision Control procedures authorized under 
Sections 81K through 81GG of Chapter 41 of the General Laws. These 
developments shall be subject to the following requirements: 



97 



a. Maximum number of dwelling units - - 5 per gross acre. 

b. Open Space shall be defined as land not occupied by build- 
ings, roadways, driveways, parking facilities or developed 
patios. 

c. Open Space Requirements: Sixty-five percent of the gross 
area shall be reserved as open space. 

Open space shall be either (1) held in common by all co- 
owners of the condominium; (2) held by a private conserva- 
tion trust or by the Conservation Commission of the Town 
of Andover; (3) included in the master deed for the con- 
dominium as being owned by the unit owner, such as yards, 
lawns and gardens. 

d. No structure shall be built within thirty (30) feet of any 
way within the development used for the general circulation 
of vehicles. 

e. No buildings shall be built closer to each other at their 
closest point than fifty feet. 

On petition of Georgina Lane and others. 

Article 11 was defeated. An unfavorable report of the Andover Planning Board was 
read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will amend the Zoning District Boundaries so that 
the parcels of land belonging to Arthur J. Poisson, James D. Doherty, Edward J. Nan- 
toski and Joseph P. Doherty and illustrated on the Assessors' Map 110, Lot 1, be 
included in the Cluster Condominium, the same being a certain tract or parcel of 
land in said Andover, bounded and described as follows: — 

Beginning at a point on the Northerly side of Lowell Street in said Andover, with- 
in said County of Essex, at the southeasterly corner of land now or formerly of 
Barberian which point is 29.0 feet Easterly from an Essex County stone bound in the 
northerly line of Lowell Street; thence NORTHEASTERLY along the Northerly line of 
said Lowell Street 150.73 feet to an Essex County stone bound; thence NORTHEASTERLY 
again along Northerly line of said Lowell Street 188.57 feet to another Essex County 
stone bound; thence NORTHEASTERLY again along the Northerly line of Lowell Street 
55.43 feet to a drill hole in the Southwesterly corner of land now or formerly of 
Di Salvo; thence NORTHWESTERLY 350 feet more or less to a point; thence NORTHERLY 
272.00 feet to a point; thence NORTHERLY again 662.68 feet to an iron pin in a 
stone wall at land now or formerly of LEWIS et al ; thence WESTERLY along the afore- 
said stone wall in various courses 712.89 feet to a drill hole; thence NORTHERLY 
along said stone wall 369.84 feet to a drill hole; thence NORTHWESTERLY in various 
courses along said stone wall 886.94 feet to an iron pin; thence NORTHWESTERLY 
again but a little more northerly 357.00 feet more or less to a point on the SOUTH- 
EASTERLY corner of Lot "B" as shown on North Essex Registry of Deeds Plan No. 6369; 
thence NORTHWESTERLY again 320.81 feet by Lot " B M and Lot "A" as shown on said 
Plan No. 6369; thence SOUTHERLY 162.25 feet by Lot No. 7 to a point as shown on a 
certain plan numbered 5226 filed with North District Essex Registry of Deeds; thence 
SOUTHERLY again 691.75 feet by Lots numbered 8 to 14 inclusive to a point as shown 
on a certain plan numbered 5241 filed with said Registry of Deeds; thence SOUTHERLY 
again 150.00 feet by lot No. 43 to a point as shown on a certain plan numbered 6051 
filed with said Registry of Deeds; thence SOUTH ERLY 235 feet more or less to a 
point at land now or formerly of one Ficks as shown on aforesaid Plan No. 6051; 
thence EASTERLY 515 feet more or less to an iron pin in the line of a brook as shown 
on Plan No. 33419A Sheet 2 recorded in Book 1029 Page 319 of said Registry of Deeds; 
thence in a general SOUTHERLY and SOUTHEASTERLY direction along the brook 1030.00 
feet more or less to an iron pin; thence SOUTHWESTERLY along said brook 266.90 feet 
to an iron pin; thence SOUTHEASTERLY 344.29 feet to land now or formerly of Barber- 
ian; thence EASTERLY along said Barberian land 627.44 feet to a drill hole; thence 
SOUTHERLY 168.46 feet along said Barberian land to the point of beginning. 

98 



On petition of Georgina Lane and others. 

Article 12 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to change the zoning classification 
from Single Residence B and Single Residence C to Apartment District the following 
described parcel of land situated on the Southerly side of Dascomb Road. 

A certain parcel of land situated in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, 
bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHERLY by Dascomb Road, 60 feet; 

EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Hall, Lampariello and Langdell by five 

courses, 262.87 feet; 98.31 feet; 148.46 feet; 47.81 feet; and 170.03 feet; 
NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Leno and Andrew, 587 feet; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Rollins, 1152.89 feet; 
SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of Hall by seven courses 208.30 feet; 42.49 

feet; 80.88 feet; 118.30 feet; 115.50 feet; 240.43 feet and 150.22 feet; 
WESTERLY by land now or formerly of Reed by eight courses 61.05 feet; 82.68 

feet; 86.52 feet; 301.33 feet; 77.13 feet; 36.32 feet; 241.88 feet and 

447.19 feet; 
NORTHWESTERLY by land now or formerly of Wyncrest Development Corporation, 300 

feet; more or less; 
EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Cail, 80 feet; 
NORTHERLY by land of Cail, Poor and Grover by two courses, 176.35 feet and 

275 feet; 
WESTERLY by land now or formerly of said Grover, 262.35 feet; 
NORTHERLY by said Dascomb Road, 127.24 feet; 
EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Moss, 250.59 feet; 
NORTHERLY by land of said Moss, 125 feet; 
WESTERLY by said Moss, 253.10 feet; 
NORTHERLY by said Dascomb Road, 80 feet; 
EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Senior by two courses, 31.42 feet and 

229.54 feet; 
NORTHERLY by land now or formerly of Senior, Viets and Cheyne by three courses, 

144.99 feet; 250 feet and 269.44 feet; and 
WESTERLY by said Cheyne, 248.62 feet. 

Said premises are shown on "Plan of Land in Andover, Mass., Owner: Maiden Savings 
Bank, April 17, 1963," which plan is recorded with North District of Essex Registry 
of Deeds as Plan No. 4973. 

On petition of Charles G. Hatch and others. 

Article 13 was defeated. 

An unfavorable report was read by John Sheehy of the Andover Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence B to 
Apartment District the following parcel of real estate: 

A certain parcel of land, with the buildings thereon, situated in said Andover, 
on the westerly side of North Main Street, bounded and described as follows in 
accordance with a plan drawn by Horace Hale Smith, C. E. , dated January 12, 
1914, recorded with North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 164: 

EASTERLY 471.8 feet by North Main Street; 

SOUTHERLY 910 feet by land of John Joyce; 

WESTERLY 560 feet by land of Ellen Ayer Wood; and 

NORTHERLY 765 feet by land of Ellen Ayer Wood. 

Containing 415,000 square feet or 9.53 acres. 

On petition of Thomas W. Tavenner and others. 



99 



Article 14 was defeated. 

An unfavorable report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Sheehy. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will appropriate from available funds the sum of 
$2,230.00 for the purchase of telephone monitoring equipment for the Police Depart- 
ment . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 15 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $2,230.00 from available funds. 

The Finance Committee unanimously approved this article. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the 
sum of $5,000.00 to purchase Self-Contained Breathing Equipment for the Fire Depart- 
ment . 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 16 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $5,000.00 from available funds. 

The Finance Committee unanimously approved this article. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the 
following sums to pay the following bills: 

(a) W. R. Hill, Inc., $31.51 for supplies purchased for the Landfill Operation. 

(b) Andover Stationers, $28.39 for office supplies purchased by the Town 
Collector. 

(c) J. A. Leone & Sons, Inc., $101.72 for fuel for the Fire Department. 

(d) Shawsheen Radiology Associates, $17.00 for X-Rays of Fireman who was 
injured while on duty. 

(e) J. A. Leone & Sons, Inc., $42.87 for fuel for the Cemetery Department. 

(f) Sanford T. Freedman, M. D. , $250.00 for services rendered to Police 
Officer injured while on duty. 

(g) Bon Secours Hospital, $997.35 for hospitalization of Police Officer 
injured while on duty. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that Article 17 be approved as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $1,468.84 from available funds. 

The Finance Committee unanimously approved this article. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name Tessier Drive as ap- 
proved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen as shown 
on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of land in Andover, dated May 15,1952, D. J. 
McCracken, Engineer and shown as Plan No. 20567B in Registration Book 26, page 205 
North Essex District Registry of Deeds; plan and description along with necessary 
deeds on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Lillian Strauss and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 18 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 



100 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Matthew Street, as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled "North Center Acres," owned by 
Joseph S. & Marie D. Pappalardo; Approved May, 1964, Eng. Charles E. Cyr , said plan 
being recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #5120. Plan and descrip- 
tion, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes being on file with the 
Town Clerk. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 19 as printed in the 
Warrant . 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Bridle Path Road, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Carriage Chase", North Essex Regis- 
try of Deeds Plan #5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., surveyed by Brooks, 
Jordan and Graves, Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the 
necessary deeds on file with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept as a public way and name Bridle 
Path Road (from Love joy Road to Landau Lane) as approved by the Andover Planning 
Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Carriage 
Chase", North Essex Registry of Deeds Plan #5590, owned by Wyncrest Development 
Corp., surveyed by Brooks, Jordan and Graves, Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and 
description, along with the necessary deeds on file with the Town Clerk. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

A RTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Hack- 
ney Circle as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled, "Carriage Chase", North Essex Registry of 
Deeds Plan #5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., surveyed by Brooks, Jordan 
and Graves, Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the neces- 
sary deeds on file with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 21 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Lan- 
dau Lane as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Carriage Chase", North Essex Registry Plan 
#5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., Surveyed by Brooks, Jordan and Graves, 
Registered Land Surveyors. 

Plan and description, along with the necessary deeds on file with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept as a public way and name Landau 
Lane (from Bridle Path Road to Hackney Circle) as approved by the Andover Planning 
Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Carriage 
Chase", North Essex Registry Plan #5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., Sur- 
veyed by Brooks, Jordan and Graves, Registered Land Surveyors. 

Plan and description, along with the necessary deeds on file with the Town Clerk. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name Phae- 
ton Circle as approved by the ANDOVER Planning Board and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Carriage Chase", North Essex Registry of 
Deeds Plan #5590, owned by Wyncrest Development Corp., surveyed by Brooks, Jordan 
and Graves, Registered Land Surveyors. Plan and description, along with the neces- 

101 



sary deeds on file with the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 23 as printed in the 
warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to rescind its action on Articles 42, 
43~ and 45 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of March, 1971, under which the 
Town voted to accept Glenwood Road, Sleepy Hollow Lane, and Clover Circle. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 24 as printed in the 
Warrant . 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mrs. James Keck. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to acquire easements by purchase, by 
gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain from Frank DeRosa and other interest- 
ed parties for drainage at High Plain Road and to appropriate the sum of $1.00 by 
transfer from available funds. 

Article 25 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 26. To see whether the Town will approve the construction of a new hous- 
ing project by the Andover Housing Authority, namely, a housing project for elderly 
persons pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 667 of Massachusetts Acts of 1954, 
and Acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, to be known as State-Aided 
Housing Project 667-3. 

Inserted at the request of the Andover Housing Authority. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town approve construction of a 
new housing project, namely, a project for the housing of elderly persons, consist- 
ing of less than 100 dwelling units pursuant to Chapter 667 of Massachusetts Acts of 
1954, and Acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, to be known as State- 
Aided Housing Project 667-3: the Selectmen and Planning Board will be kept periodi- 
cally advised of progress and plans of the Housing Authority. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John Sheehy. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will authorize the transfer from the Conservation 
Commission to the Andover Housing Authority without payment the following described 
property as a facility for Housing for the Elderly: 

Beginning at a point on the Easterly side of Carmel Road being the Northwesterly 
corner of land N/F James Buss; thence running Easterly by land of said James Buss 
165' more or less to a stone wall at land N/F Walter Tomlinson; thence running North- 
easterly along said stone wall by land of said Walter Tomlinson 210' more or less to 
a corner; thence running Southeasterly along said stone wall by land of said Tomlin- 
son and land N/F Sapienza 440' more or less to a point; thence running Northerly by 
land N/F Town of Andover 560' more or less to a point; thence running Northwesterly 
by land of said Town of Andover 590' more or less to a point; thence running South- 
westerly by land of said Town of Andover 910' more or less; Thence running North- 
easterly in two courses by land N/F of Arnold 84' more or less and 80' more or less 
to a point on the projection of the Westerly side of said Carmel Road; thence run- 
ning Southeasterly by land of said Arnold 20' more or less to a point at the end of 
said Carmel Road; thence running Northeasterly along the end of said Carmel Road 20' 
more or less to a point; thence running Northeasterly and Southeasterly in a curved 
line having a radius of 60' and a length of 168' more or less to a point; thence 
running Southeasterly along the Easterly side line of said Carmel Road 3' more or 
less to the point of beginning. 

Said parcel containing 10 acres more or less. 

Being a portion of land shown on Assessors Map 20, Parcel 34 owned by the Town of 

102 



Andover . 

And further to authorize a petition by the Town to the Legislature to validate 
this transfer if it is so voted, or see what the Town will do in regards to the 
same. 

Inserted at the request of the Andover Housing Authority. 

Article 27 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to request the Housing Authority not to 
apply its powers of eminent domain against tax revenue producing property until all 
alternatives have been exhausted. 

On petition of Joseph H. Landry and others. 

Article 28 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to receive the report of the Committee 
appointed by the Moderator at the March 8, 1971 Town Meeting concerning Representa- 
tive Town Government and to take such action thereon as may be appropriate. 

No report. Article 29 was withdrawn. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 11:25 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 



ATTEST: 



Elden R. Salter 
Town Clerk 



103 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Bureau of Accounts 

Leverett Saltonstall Building, Government Center 

100 Cambridge Street, Boston 02201 



July 19, 1971 

To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. Robert A. Watters, Chairman 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the year ending December 31, 
1970, made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, General 
Laws. This is in the form of a report made to me by Mr. Gordon A. 
McGill, Assistant Chief of Bureau. 



Very truly yours, 

(Sgd.) ARTHUR H. MacKINNON 
AHMrNEM Director of Accounts 



104 



Mr. Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and accounts of 
the town of Andover for the year ending December 31, 1970, and submit the following 
report thereon: 

The records of financial transactions of the town, as shown on the books 
of the several departments receiving or disbursing money for the town or committing 
bills for collection, were examined and verified by comparison with the books and 
records of the town accountant and the town treasurer. 

The books and accounts in the office of the town accountant were examined 
and checked in detail. The recorded receipts were compared with the treasurer's 
books and with the records in the several departments collecting money for the town, 
while the payments, as entered, were checked with the treasurer's books and with 
the treasury warrants. The appropriations, transfers, and loan authorizations were 
checked with the town clerk's records of financial votes passed by the town meeting 
and with the finance committee's authorizations of transfers from the reserve fund. 

The general and appropriation ledgers were analyzed for the period of the 
audit, a trial balance was taken off, the necessary adjustments resulting from the 
audit were made, and a balance sheet showing the financial condition of the town on 
December 31, 1970 was prepared and is appended to this report. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were examined and checked in 
detail. The receipts, as recorded, were analyzed and compared with the records in 
the several departments collecting money for the town, with other sources from 
which the town received money, and with the town accountant's books, while the 
recorded payments were checked with the warrants authorizing the disbursement of 
town funds and with the town accountant's records. 

The cash book was footed, and the cash balance on January 31, 1971 was 
verified by reconciliation of the bank balances with statements furnished by the 
banks of deposit, by inspection of the savings bank books, by verification of the 
amount invested in certificates of deposit, and by actual count of the cash in the 
office. 

The payments on account of maturing debt and interest were proved with 
the amounts falling due and checked with the cancelled securities on file. The 
outstanding coupons were listed and reconciled with the balance in the bond and 
coupon account as shown by a statement received from the bank of deposit. 

The records of payroll deductions on account of Federal and State taxes, 
purchase of savings bonds, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, group insurance, and the 
United Fund were examined. The deductions were footed, the payments to the proper 
agencies were verified, and the balances on hand were reconciled with the respective 
controls in the town accountant's ledger. 

The records of tax titles and tax possessions held by the town were exam- 
ined and checked. The taxes and assessments transferred to the tax title account 
were checked with the collector's books, the reported redemptions of tax titles 
were compared with the treasurer's recorded receipts, and the tax titles and tax 
possessions on hand were listed, reconciled with the town accountant's ledger, and 
checked with the records at the Registry of Deeds. 



105 



The savings bank books and securities representing the investments of 
the several trust, investment, and retirement funds in the custody of the town 
treasurer and the treasurers of the trustees of the John Cornell, Punchard Free 
School, and the Memorial Hall Library funds were examined and listed. The income 
was proved, the amounts transferred to the town were verified, and all transactions 
were reconciled with the books of the town treasurer, the treasurers of the trustees, 
and the town accountant, and, in the case of the retirement funds, with the records 
of the retirement board. 

The cash balances in the several trust and retirement funds on January 31, 
1971 were verified by reconciliation of the bank balances with statements furnished 
by the banks of deposit. 

The books and accounts in the tax collector's office were examined and 
checked. The taxes, excise, and assessments outstanding at the time of the previous 
audit, and all subsequent commitments, were audited and compared with the assessors' 
warrants. The cash receipts as posted in the commitment books were compared with 
the cash book record of collections, the abatements were compared with the assessors' 
records of abatements granted, the taxes and assessments transferred to the tax 
title account were checked with the treasurer's records of tax titles held by the 
town, the payments to the treasurer were verified, and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and proved with the ledger controls. 

It is again recommended that a determined effort be made to effect a 
settlement of the past due excise accounts which date back to 1960, and that efforts 
be continued to secure a prompt settlement of the delinquent tax accounts. 

The records of departmental accounts receivable were examined. The pay- 
ments to the treasurer were verified, the abatements were checked, and the outstand- 
ing accounts were listed and reconciled with the accountant's ledger. 

The books and accounts of the public works department were examined. The 
records of water charges were examined and checked. The recorded collections were 
compared with the payments to the treasurer, the abatements as recorded were veri- 
fied, and the outstanding accounts were listed and reconciled with the accountant's 
ledger . 

Verification of the outstanding tax, excise, assessment, departmental, 
and water accounts was made by mailing notices to a number of persons whose names 
appeared on the books as owing money to the town, and from the replies received 
thereto it appears that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The assessors' records of apportioned sewer and water assessments were 
examined. The payments in advance were checked with the treasurer's recorded 
receipts, the amounts added to the 1970 tax levy were compared with the tax collec- 
tor's records, and the apportionments due in future years were listed and reconciled 
with the respective ledger controls. 

The town clerk's records pertaining to dog and sporting licenses issued, 
as well as to collections for town licenses, recording fees, marriage intentions, 
etc., were examined and checked. The cash book was footed, the payments to the 
State were checked with the receipts on file, the payments to the town treasurer 
were compared with the treasurer's recorded receipts, and the cash on hand Janu- 
ary 31, 1971 was verified. 

The records of cash receipts of the sealer of weights and measures, and 
the inspectors of buildings, wires, gas and plumbing, as well as of the health, 
police, fire, school, and library departments, and of all other departments wherein 
money is collected for the town, were examined and checked. The payments to the 
treasurer were verified by comparison with the treasurer's and the town accountant's 
books, and the cash on hand in the several departments was proved by actual count. 



106 



The surety bonds of the officials required by law to furnish them were 
examined and found to be in proper form. 

There are appended to this report, in addition to the balance sheet, 
tables showing reconciliations of the treasurer's and the town clerk's cash, 
summaries of the tax, excise, assessment, tax title, tax possession, departmental, 
and water accounts, as well as schedules showing the condition and transactions of 
the trust, investment, and retirement funds. 

During the progress of the audit cooperation was received from all of- 
ficials of the town, for which, on behalf of my assistants and for myself, I wish 
to express appreciation. 



Respectfully submitted, 



(Sgd.) Gordon A. McGill 
Assistant Chief of Bureau 



GAM/NEM 



SALE OF SURPLUS PROPERTY 

During the year the following items were sold at public auction by the 
Town Manager : 

Addressograph $300.00 

Graphotype & Cabinets 153.00 

Gas Stoves 164.00 

School Desks 78.00 

$695.00 

This report submitted in accordance with Article 10 of the March, 1971, 
Town Meeting. 

107 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



JANUARY 1, 1972 



State Equalized Valuation 
Borrowing Capacity 5% 
Town Debt as of December 31, 1971 
Less Debt Outside Debt Limit : 

1956-Senior High School 

(West Jr. High) 
1957-South School 
1957-Water-Wells 
1961-Sanborn 
1963-Accelerated Sewer 
1966-New Senior High School 
1966-Fish Brook 

1967-Water Mains- (North Street) 
1967-Bancrof t Reservoir ) 
1967-Bancroft School 
1967-New Senior High School 

(Additional) 
1968-West Elementary School Addition 
1968-Water Mains- Industrial Park) 
1968-Water Mains-Bancroft Loop ) 
1970-Water Mains-Lowell Street 
•1971-Water Treatment Plant 



$200,000,000 
10,000,000, 



$15,710,000 



$ 360,000, 

240,000, 
15,000, 
275,000, 
495,000, 
2,730,000, 
560,000, 

600,000, 

1,420,000, 

700,000. 

1,915,000. 

185,000, 

150,000. 

2,950,000. 



12,595,000.* 



Town Debt Inside Debt Limit 

Borrowing Capacity as of January 1, 1972 

Less Debt Inside Debt Limit Appropriation 
Voted but not bonded or borrowed by Note : 

1962-Rogers Brook I $ 20,000. 

1967-Land Acquisition Conservation 2,500. 

1967-1969 Public Safety Center 2,000. 

1968-Bancroft Sewer 4,000. 

1968-Sewer West Andover 1,545,000. 



3,115,000.** 
$ 6,885,000. 



1,573,500, 



Uncommitted Borrowing Capacity as of January 1, 1972 

Outside Debt Limit Voted but not Bonded: 

Art. 26-1970-Water Treatment Plant $1,050,000. 
Art. 36-1971-Water Treatment Plant 1,000,000. 
Art. 6-1971-Water Treatment Plant 150,000. 

Inside Debt Limit Voted and Borrowed by Note 
instead of Bonding in 197TT 



$ 5,311,500, 



Art. 15-1970-School Land Acquisition $ 



5,000 



This sum was box-rowed in 1970 in anticipation 
of bond issue. Required to be paid in 1971. 
Amount will be included in sum to be raised 
by taxation in 1972. 



108 



Town Debt as of December 31, 1971 
DATE OF BONDS OUTSIDE* 



2/1/56 

1/15/57 

11/15/57 

10/1/61 

11/15/63 

4/1/66 

4/1/66 

12/1/67 

12/1/67 

12/1/67 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

7/15/70 

7/15/71 



Senior High School (West Jr. High) 

South School 

Water-Wells 

Sanborn School 

Accelerated Sewer 

New Senior High School 

Fish Brook 

Water Mains-North Street-Bancroft Reservoir 

Bancroft School 

New Senior High School (Additional) 

West Elementary School Addition 

Water Mains- Industrial Park and Bancroft Loop 

Water Mains-Lowell Street 

Water Treatment Plant 



360 
240 
15 
275 
495 

2,730 
560 
600 

1,420 
700 

1,915 
185 
150 

2,950 



,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000. 
,000, 
,000, 
,000, 
,000. 
,000, 
,000. 
,000. 
,000. 
,000. 
,000. 



$12,595,000, 



DATE OF BONDS 



INSIDE** 



2/1/56 

12/15/60 

12/1/62 

4/1/66 

12/1/67 

4/1/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

12/15/68 

7/15/70 

7/15/70 

7/15/71 



Senior High School (West Jr. High) 

Riverina Sewer 

Rogers Brook I 

Municipal Building Bonds 

Public Safety Center (Police, Fire, Civil Defense) 

Rogers Brook II 

Sewer- Industrial Park-Bancroft Loop 

Street Construct ion- Industrial Park 

East Junior High Remodeling 

Land Acquisition-Conservation 

Sewer-Lowell and Chestnut Street & Summer Street 

Public Safety Bonds 

School Land Acquisition 



40,000, 

60,000, 

15,000, 

795,000, 

450,000, 

60,000, 

445,000, 

180,000, 

240,000, 

195,000, 

180,000, 

95,000, 

360,000, 



$ 3,115,000 



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110 



SCHEDULE I 
REVENUE 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1971 
GROUP I 
RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 



Machinery Basis 

Veterans Benefits 

Loss of Taxes - State Properties 

Construction of School Projects 

School Lunch Program 

Regional Public Libraries 

Free Public Libraries 

Vocational Education 

Regional School District Aid 

Tuition & Transportation of Children 

Valuation Basis 

Special Education Programs 

School Aid 

Loss of Taxes -Abatements to Veterans 

Loss of Taxes -Abatements to Others 

Outside Schools Transportation 

Valuation Basis - Adjustment 

Adjustment - Other 

School Transportation 



Special Assessments 
Unapportioned Sewer 
Apportioned Sewer paid in advance 
Apportioned Sewer added to taxes : 

Current Year 

Previous Years 
Apportioned Water paid in advance 
Apportioned Water added to taxes: 

Current Year 

Previous Years 



67,390.35 

18,858.69 

18,473.82 

150,941.24 

86,993.69 

26,794.76 

4,283.50 

2,587.00 

93,462.06 

29,565.46 

127,492.69 

123,626.00 

537,000.00 

1,288.00 

860.00 

552.00 

3,872.93 

428.46 

115,213.00 



2,342.96 
9,584.28 

17,346.04 

968.09 

2,418.30 

1,343.66 
349.46 



1,409,684.15 



34,352.79 



Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise Taxes 
Current Year 
Previous Years 



Licenses 
Liquor 
Marriage 
Dog License Fees 
Miscellaneous 



648,261.63 
110,760.64 



8,130.00 
522.00 
604.15 

5,293.27 



759,022.27 



14,549.42 



Fines 



1,806.00 



111 



General Government 

Rent of Town Property 1,200.00 

Miscellaneous 7,612.66 



j 



Cemeteries : 

Care of Lots 233.00 

Foundations 1,405.45 

Tombs and Interments 4,215.00 

Miscellaneous 240.00 

Interest: 

Committed 10,101.02 

Certificates of Deposit 78,286.74 

Savings Accounts 8,479.22 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 604.19 

Taxes and Assessments 12,624.48 

Tax Titles 249.01 

Farm Animal Excise Taxes: 

Current Year 535.00 

Previous Years 20.00 



112 



8,812.66 



Protection of Persons and Property: 

Ambulance Fees 3,201.00 

Building Inspection 23,253.00 

Electrical Inspection 2,543.00 

Gas Inspection 459.00 

Septic Tank Permits 1,160.00 

Miscellaneous 3,973.40 

34,589.40 
Health and Sanitation: 

Plumbing Inspection 1,752.00 

Highways : 

Snow Removal - State 891.00 

Veterans Services : 

Reimbursements - Individual 1,525.30 

Schools: 

Summer School Tuition 13,435.50 

Other Tuition 7,198.23 

Rentals and Other 1,094.11 

21,727.84 
Libraries : 

Fines and Miscellaneous 665.08 

Public Service Enterprises: 

Water Rates 400,520.33 

Water Services 1,984.81 
Water Liens added to taxes : 

Current Year 12,545.41 

Previous Years 3,785.19 



418,835.74 



6,093.45 



110,344.66 



555.00 



Andover Housing Authority 
Lieu of Taxes 



1,876.00 



Recreation 



35.25 



2,827,118.01 



GROUP II 
RECEIPTS NOT INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 



Tax Title Redemptions 

Tax Title Costs 

Dog Funds - Care and Custody 

Insurance Claims 

Workmens Compensation Refunds 

Refunds : 

Departmental 

Petty Cash 

Miscellaneous 
Chapter 90 Aid to Highways : 

State Aid 

County Aid 
Sale of Equipment 



2,117.94 

47.24 

2,184.00 

4,350.18 

166.86 

2,975.47 

1,645.00 

23,848.34 

2,538.83 
1,226.13 
1,397.46 

42,497.45 



GROUP III 
AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Personal Property Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Real Estate Taxes: 
Current Year 
Previous Years 

Dog Licenses to County 

Off Street Parking Meters 

Sale of Dogs 

Public Welfare Federal Grants: 

M. A. Administration 

M. A. Assistance 
School Lunch Program 
Andover Athletic Association 
P. L. 874 

Cemetery Sale of Lots 
Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Interest: 

Spring Grove Cemetery Funds 

Trust and Investment Funds 

Flower Funds 



372,611.19 
5,024.78 



1,925,217.74 
235,895.98 



377,635.97 



9,161,113.72 

8,507.93 

960.00 

99.00 

1,311.27 
1,339.78 
251,965.86 
5,950.75 
41,776.00 
2,225.00 
4,832.10 

10,851.87 

2,112.76 

281.00 



113 



Municipal Debt: 

Loans in Anticipation of Bond Issue 75,000.00 

Bond Issue 3,310,000.00 

Premium on Bond Issue 377.34 

Non-Revenue Cash Investments 1,828,000.00 

Revenue Cash Investments 2,100,000.00 

Payroll Deductions: 

Blue Cross and Blue Shield 93,504.99 

Group Insurance 8,188.58 

Group Insurance - Optional 10,575.50 

U. S. Savings Bonds 20,667.50 

United Fund 4 , 474. 40 

Withholding Taxes - Federal 1,072,788.51 

Withholding Taxes - State 235,048.86 

Miscellaneous 68,276.03 

Transfer to Surplus Revenue 4,858.87 

Accrued Interest on Bonds 8,734.72 

Guarantee Deposits 466.88 

Tailings 313.70 

22,712,238.89 



GROUP I 2,827,118.01 
GROUP II 42,497.45 
GROUP III 22,712,238.89 

25,581,854.35 



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125 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1971 



Non-contributory Pensions 
Employees' Payroll Deductions: 

Federal Withholding Taxes 

State Withholding Taxes 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 

Group Insurance 

United Fund 

U. S. Savings Bonds 
Trust Funds 
Perpetual Care Funds 
Dog Licenses to County 
Walter Raymond Welfare Fund 
Unclaimed Checks 
Sale of Dogs 
Petty Cash Advances 
Revenue Cash Investments 
Non-Revenue Cash Investments 
Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 

Bond Issues 
Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 

Revenue 
Retirement System Pensions 
County Tax 

State Parks and Reservations 
P. L. 874 
Title I 
Title II 

Title II - E. S. E. A. 
Title V 

George Barden Fund 
Public Welfare 
Insurance Recovery 
Guaranty Deposits - Highway 
Miscellaneous 
Refunds : 

Real Estate Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Water Rates 

Miscellaneous 



23,206.00 

1,065,097.18 

235,048.86 

92,632.78 

18,283.98 

12,023.32 

20,400.00 

960.88 

5,332.10 

6,216.35 

522.94 

15.50 

90.00 

1,645.00 

2,200,000.00 

1,456,000.00 

155,000.00 

4,000,000.00 

188,528.00 

249,214.00 

46,503.75 

60,226.82 

33,443.60 

.37 

8,683.52 

960.00 

178.80 

388.00 

272.80 

466.88 

1,176.77 

21,083.34 
490.50 

19,753.98 

766.12 

342.09 

9,925,054.55 



126 



RECAP 



Cash Balances, January 1, 1971: 
General 

Revenue Investments 
Non-Revenue Investments 
Sewer Project 



734,788.70 

2,100,000.00 

700,000.00 

4,858.87 



3,539,647.57 



Revenue : 
General 
Water Treatment Plant 



22,623,733.32 
3,507,046.03 



26,130,779.35 



29,670,426.92 



Expenditures : 
General 
Sewer Project 
Transfer to Water Treatment 

Plant 
Water Treatment Plant 
Non-Revenue Investments 



22,408,303.67 
4,858.87 

548,925.00 

1,253,535.86 

272,000.00 



24,487,623.40 



Cash Balances, December 31, 
General 

Revenue Investments 
Non-Revenue Investments 
Water Treatment Plant 



1971: 



401,293.35 
2,200,000.00 

328,000.00 
2,253,510.17 



5,182,803.52 



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133 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded and Article 10, 1955-High School 400,000.00 

Fixed Debt 15,710,000.00 Article 1, 1957-South School 240,000.00 

Article 24, 1961-Sanbom School 275,000.00 
Article 1, 1957-Ballardvale 

& Abbot Wells 15,000.00 

Article 14, 1960-Sewer Trunk 

Line 60,000.00 

Article 48, 1960-Rogers Brook 15,000.00 
Article 1, 1963-Sewer APW-46G 495,000.00 
Article 8, 1964-High School 2,730,000.00 
Article 6, 1965-Fish Brook 560,000.00 
Article 11, 1965 -Municipal 

Buildings 795,000.00 

Article 1, 1967-Bancroft 

School 1,420,000.00 

Article 1, 1966 and Article 

3, 1967-High School 700,000.00 

Article 13, 1967-Water 

System Projects 600,000.00 

Article 16, 1967 -Municipal 

Buildings 450,000.00 

Article 3B, 1967 -Rogers Brook 60,000.00 
Article 8B, 1968 and Article 
17, 1968-West and Bancroft 
Schools 1,915,000.00 

Article 10, 1967-Land 

Acquisition 195,000.00 

Article 15, 1968-East Jr. 

High Remodeling 240,000.00 

Article 4C, 1967-Street 

Construction 180,000.00 

Article 4A, 1967 and Article 

32, 1968-Water Projects 185,000.00 
Article 4B, 1967 and Article 

16, 1968-Sewer Projects 445,000.00 
Article 19A and 3B, 1969- 
Sewer Project Lowell & 

Summer Streets 180,000.00 

Article 5, 1968 and Article 
2B, 1969-Water Project 

Lowell Street 150,000.00 

Article 14, 1969-Municipal 

Buildings 95,000.00 
Article 26, 1970-Water 
Treatment Plant 2,950,000.00 
Article 15, 1970-School Sites 360,000.00 



15,710,000.00 15,710,000.00 



134 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 222,499.83 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 
Revenue Due in 1972 



to 1990 Inclusive 



222,499.83 



Apportioned Water Assessments 

Not Due 19,458.86 



Suspended Sewer Assessments 

10,041.83 



Suspended Water Assessments 



2,341.66 



254,342.18 



Apportioned Water Assessments 
Revenue Due in 1972 
to 1987 Inclusive 19,458.86 



Suspended Sewer Assessments 

Revenue 10,041.83 



Suspended Water Assessments 

Revenue 2,341.66 



254,342.18 



135 



ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 
December 31, 1971 



Cash Balance, January 1, 1971 

Merrimack Valley National Bank 

Andover Savings Bank 

Provident Institution for Savings 

Receipts: 

Payroll Deductions 

Make-up Payments 

Transfers from Other Systems 

Pension Payments from Other Systems 

Government Securities Matured 

Appropriations : 

Town 188,528.00 

Housing Authority 1,757.00 

Investment Income 



9,055.57 

2,001.00 

48,000.00 



128,701.20 

5,223.65 

2,691.36 

2,985.59 

38,939.60 



190,285.00 
60,226.92 



59,056.57 



429,053.32 
488,109.89 



Disbursements : 

Administrative Expense: 

Salaries 

Other Expenses 
Refunds 

Annuities Paid 
Pensions Paid 
Purchases of Securities 
Interest on Refunds 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 



4,023.51 
780.50 



4,804.01 

12,487.29 

19,980.81 

184,751.95 

217,442.05 

242.67 

2,111.20 



441,819.98 



Cash Balance, December 31, 1971: 
Merrimack Valley National Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 
Provident Institution for Savings 



3,188.91 

101.00 

43,000.00 



46,289.91 



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138 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 



ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert A. Watters, Chairman - 1973 

Roger W. Collins, Vice-Chairman - 1974 

George E. Heseltine, Secretary - 1973 

Milton Greenberg - 1974 

Sidney P. White - 1972 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

William F. King, Chairman - 1974 

Francis E. Griggs, Jr. - 1974 

Frank Hill, Jr. - 1973 

Daniel Frishman - 1972 

Richard A. Katz - 1973 



TOWN MODERATOR 

Arthur Williams - 1972 



TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 
Frederick E. Cheever, 

Chairman - 1973 
Charles Dalton - 1974 
John M. Murray - 1972 



TRUSTEES, PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Fred W. Doyle - 1973 

Arthur W. Cole - 1973 

Willam V. Emmons - 1973 

Malcolm J. Ruhl - 1973 

Harry Sellars - 1973 

Rev. J. Edison Pike 

Rev. J. Everett Bodge 

Rev. Norman E. Dubie, Sr. 



REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Fred S. Tarbox, Andover - 1973 

John P. Ford, Lawrence 

Joseph F. Sweeney, Lawrence 

Patrick McCarthy, Lawrence 

John W. Regan, Methuen 

Thomas F. Clarke, Methuen 

John H. 0' Sullivan, No. Andover 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Thomas P. Eldred, Chairman - 1976 
*Richard A. Savrann - 1976 
John B. White, Jr. - 1975 
Thomas R. Wallace - 1974 
Winston A. Blake - 1973 

* Appointed by Commissioner of 

Department of Community Affairs (State) 



APPOINTIVE 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Dr. Albert J. Greenberg, Chairman 

Edward L. Powers, Secretary 

Alexander D. Gibson, Jr. 

Harold T. Cookson 

Arthur Heifetz 

Richard C. MacGowan 

Francis J. Byrne 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Robert S. Zollner, Chairman 
Sherley M. Sweet, Jr. 
William V. Emmons 

Associate Members: 
Virginia Hammond 
Robert Domingue 
Domenic Terranova 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE BOARD OF HEALTH 



James D. Doherty, Chairman 
Douglas N. Howe, Secretary 
Richard W. Lally 
Eugene A. Bernard in, Jr. 
Arthur A. Collins 



Robert A. Walsh, Chairman 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 

Dr. William R. O'Reilly 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Archibald D. Maclaren, 

Jr. , Chairman 
Phillips B. Marsden,Jr, 
William H. Russell 



TOWLE FUND TRUST 
A. Graham Baldwin 
Mrs. David Duncan, Jr. 
Geoffrey Glendinning 

TRUSTEES-SPRING GROVE 

CEMETERY 

Gilbert J. Cromie, Chairman 
Fred E . Cheever 
Leo F. Daley 
Malcolm E. Lundgren 
Irving J. Whitcomb 



BOARD OF RETIREMENT 
David L.Nicoll, Chairman 
Leo F. Daley 
Wendell A. Mattheson,Sec 'y 

CENTRAL MERRIMACK 
VALLEY PLANNING DISTRICT 
Harold T. King 
Frederick M. Childs,Alt. 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Thomas P. Brennan 
Harry Sellars 
Eugene A. Zalla 
Elden R. Salter 

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Harold T. King 
Frederick Flather, Jr. 
Francis J. Trombly 



139 



PLANNING BOARD 

Harold T. King, Chairman 

David M. Erickson, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. James Keck, Secretary 

John F. Sheehy 

Dr. Wm. E. Haskell (Resigned Sept.*71) 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Joseph L. Monan , Chairman 
Mrs. Edmond E. Hammond, Jr 
Mrs. Waters Kellogg 
Edward F. Cregg, Esq. 
Ralph Preble 
Warren H. Oldaker 
Robert M. Henderson 



Secretary 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Dr. Ernest F. Costello, Chairman 

Fred G. Arragg , M.D. , Treasurer 

Frederick S. Allis, Jr. 

Edward I. Erickson 

Mrs. Richard D. Hornidge 

Milton E. Prevost 

Mrs . Thayer Warshaw 

Harry Sagris , Director 

PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

Benjamin Brown (AmLegion) 

Gordon Cannon (V.F.W.) 

Elmer S. Ober (Veterans' Service Agent) 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Edward A. Gordon, Esq., Chairman 

Mrs. Janet D. Lake 

Michael Morris 

Mrs. Suzanne J. Stephens 

Mrs. Hazel Wilson 

Jason Wright 

Leslie S. Bartow, Member ex officio 



GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL REFUSE 

DISPOSAL PLANNING BOARD 

Robert E. McQuade 
Joseph Odium 
Eugene E . Hand 



DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Wolf Berthold, Chairman 

Horace M. Poynter, Jr., Secretary 

Anthony DiDio 

S. Joseph Hoffman 

Dr. Lawrence Spiegel 

Douglas Anderson 

Thomas W. Tavenner, Esq. 



SOLID WASTE SITE COMMITTEE 
Joseph W. Odium Chairman 
David Erickson 
Edward M. Lenoe 
David MacDonald, Jr. 
Harold R. Rafton 
Robert E. McQuade 



PLANNING BOARD OF APPEALS 
William Dubocq, Jr. 
Joseph A. McCarthy 
William Schlott 



GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 
Robert E. McQuade, Andover's Representa- 
tive until January 14, 1974 



NEW MATERIALS COMMITTEE 
James D. Hamilton 
Arthur Peatman 
Kenneth Wade 



CE NTRAL MERRIMACK VALLEY PLANNING DIST. 
Harold T. King(Appt'd by Planning Board) 
Frederick M. Childs, Alternate (Appt'd 

by Selectmen) 



ADVISORY COUNCIL ON COMMUNITY GOALS 

J. Maynard Austin, Town Manager 

Wolf Berthold, Dev.& Indus .Commission 

Dr. Albert J. Greenberg, Finance Committee 

Dr. Richard Katz, School Committee 

Harold T. King, Planning Board 

Joseph L. Monan, Conservation Commission 

Mrs. Eliz. Nadeau, Director, Health Dept . 

Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert, Supt . of Schools 

Robert A.Watters, Chairman, Bd.of Selectmen 

AREA ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE 

Harold T. King 

Horace M. Poynter, Jr. 



COMMUNITY SCHOOL STUDY COMMITTEE 

Richard F. Barney 

Theodore Boudreau 

George H. Bragdon 

Mrs. R. Milton Cole 

Rev. Charles A. Fowlie 

Willis E. Gray 

Robert Radula 



IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED DISTRICT 
John Avery, Town Engineer 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Stanley E. Butcher, President Philip A. Dargie 
Philip K. Allen, Vice President Mrs. Mitchell Johnson, Jr. 
Mrs. David M. Thompson, Sec'y Arthur E. Kerwien 

Irving 0. Piper 



140 



ambulance study committee 

Dean Webster, Chairman 
Rev. Charles A. Fowlie 
William L. Lane 
William D. Martin 
Dr. Wm. R. O'Reilly 
Mrs. Louise B. Stupack 
Mrs. Hazel G. Wilson 



GREATER LAWRENCE COMMUNITY ACTION 

COUNCIL, INC. 

Thomas F. O'Leary 



LAND OVERSEERS FOR CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



HAGGETTS POND RESERVATION 

Mrs. William Beaulieu 

Philip Busby 

Mrs. Virginia Hammond, Chairman 

Mrs. Charles Kirk 

Chester Whitney 

ESSEX RESERVATION 
M. Lawrence Aitel 
Henry Brouck 
Andrew Campbell 
Paul Gyrsting 
Frank Haggerty 
Thomas W. Sutton, Jr. 

HUSSEY'S POND & JOYCE TERRACE 

Edward F. Cregg, Esq., Chairman 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Dr. 

Mrs 

Mrs 



, Claire Bodenrader 
, Elizabeth Buckley 
Daniel Frishman 
, Rosemary Seccareccio 
, Gladys Wait 



FISH BROOK RESERVATION 
Mrs . Paul McKinnon 
Paul McKinnon 



CARMEL WOODS RESERVATION 

Mrs. Waters Kellogg, Chairman 

Mrs. William H. Ash 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard C. Cobin 

Mrs. David Darling 

T. Augustine Farragher 

Mr . & Mrs . James E . Fox 

FOSTER RESERVATION 
Joseph Monan, Chairman 
Charles Bentley 
Mrs. Jane Bolton 
John W. Bolton 
Gilbert J. Cromie 



CATALANO-FOSTER RESERVATION 
Ralph Preble, Chairman 
William Cook 
Robert Osborne 
Theodore Reed 

******** 



COMMUNITY SCHOOL STUDY COMMITTEE 
Richard F. Barney, Chairman 
Theodore Boudreau 
George H. Bragdon 
Mrs. R. Milton Cole 
Rev. Charles A. Fowlie 
Willis E. Gray 
Robert Radula 



CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 
Winston C. Briggs , Director 
Alex Ritchie, Asst. Director 
Philip C. Shine, Asst .Director 
(Raytheon) 



Student Members 



Jay Pennick 
William Hixon 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY THE FEASIBILITY OF ADOPTING THE REPRESENTATIVE FORM OF GOVERNMENT 



William Dalton, Esq., Chairman 
James D. Doherty 
Frederick P. Fitzgerald 
Mrs . Bernice Haggerty 
Forrest Noyes , Jr. 
Irving 0. Piper 



Francis P. Reilly 
Stanley Saba 
Mrs. Janet L. Scheerer 
Gerald M. Silverman 
Richard H. Young 



141 



Animal Inspector ... Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 

Assessor William Russell 

Civil Defense Director . .Winston C. Briggs 

Community Organizer Wilfred Harvey 

Coordinator of Federal 

Assistance Programs John Lewis 

Director of Public Health . .Eliz .Nadeau, RN 

Dog Officer Donald Porter 

Fire Chief Henry L. Hilton 

Gas Inspector Walter R. Vogt 

Game Warden Forrest H. Noyes , Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden. . .James V. Deyermond 
" ' " " ..Clifford A. Westcott 
" " " Eugene A. Zalla, Jr. 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

James E. Manning 

Highway Supt Stanley Chlebowski 

Inspector of Buildings Arthur Peatman 

Inspector of Wires Alex Ritchie 

Asst . Inspector of Wires Arthur Silva 

Management Aide Israel M. Lichtman 

Memorial Hall Library, Director - 

Harry Sagris 

Police Chief David L. Nicoll 

Police Legal Adviser ... .John E. Boyle, Jr. 
Public Works Director .. .Robert E. McQuade 



Sanitary & Plumbing 

Inspector Walter R. Vogt 

Asst . Sanitary & 

Plumbing Inspector ... .Harold R. Rutter 
Sanitarian Consultant . .Joseph Barbagalla 
School Department : 

Visual Consultant .. .Wm. V. Emmons, O.D, 

Head Nurse Ruth Westcott 

Physician ... .John J. McArdle,Jr., M.D. 

Attendance Officer Richard Aumais 

Dentist Frank E. Himmer, D.M.D, 

Sealer of Weights & 

Measures Newton A . Jones 

Supt. of Schools.. Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert 

Town Accountant Wendell A. Mattheson 

Town Clerk Elden R. Salter 

Town Collector Myron H. Muise 

Town Counsel ... .Fredric S. O'Brien, Esq. 

Town Engineer John Avery 

Town Manager J. Maynard Austin 

Town Planner Joseph Schall 

Town Treasurer Anna M. Greeley 

After Mar. 3rd Myron H. Muise 

Tree Dept . Supt Philip A. Busby 

Town Constables Benjamin C. Brown 

Thomas P. Eldred 
Veterans' Service Agent ... .Elmer S. Ober 






UNITED STATES SENATORS 



Senator Edward W. Brooke 
535 Beacon Street, Boston 



Senator Edward M. Kennedy 
1702 P.O.Bldg., Boston 



FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

F. Bradford Morse, 466 Beacon Street, Lowell 

FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 

Thomas J. Lane, 92 Abbott Street, Lawrence 

FIFTH ESSEX SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

William X. Wall, 179 Spruce Street, Lawrence 

THIRTEENTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 

James P. Hurrell, 82 Saunders Street, North Andover 

FOURTEENTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 

Gerard A. Guilmette, 15 Foxcroft Ave., Lawrence 
Edward J. Grimley, Jr., 11 Kress Street, Lawrence 

SEVENTEENTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 

William G. Arvanitis, 510 Lowell Street, Lawrence 



142 



INDEX 



Animal Inspection 46 

Anniversary Celebration (325th) . . 23 

Assessors 13 

AVIS 25 

Board of Appeals 19 

Board of Health 37 

Building Inspection 41 

Civil Defense 39 

Conservation Commission . . . . . . 26 

Council on Aging. . . „ 17 

Development and Industrial 

Commission 27 

Directory of Town Officials . . . . 139 

Dog Officer 22 

Electrical Inspection ....... 19 

Engineering . 48 

Financial Statements. . 104 

Fire Department 20 

Forestry. ............. 47 

Fourth of July Celebration. .... 28 

Game Warden 21 

Greater Lawrence Regional Refuse 

Disposal Planning Board ..... 53 

Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 

Technical High School 32 

Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 

Commission. ........... 53 

Highways • . . 49 

Historical Commission 24 



Housing Authority 40 

John Cornell Wood 85 Coal Fund. . . 30 

Jury List 58 

Landfill 51 

Margaret G. Towle Fund ...... 56 

Memorial Hall Library 43 

Merrimack Valley Planning 

Commission 54 

Municipal Buildings. ....... 16 

Parks. 47 

Planning Board 18 

Police Department 22 

Recreation 29 

School Department. ... 31 

Selectmen. ....... 4 

Sewers 51 

Spring Grove Cemetery 50 

Town Clerk . 10 

Town Collector .......... 12 

Town Counsel 10 

Town Manager . 6 

Town Meeting Minutes 62 

Town Treasurer „ . 11 

Trustees Punchard Free School. . . 57 

Veterans' Services 36 

Water Department 50 

Weights and Measures 39 







V*4 



°% 



J Selectman 1 



Town Manager \^ 



Planning Board \^ 



^School Department^ 



( Landfill \ 



( Memprial \ 
J Hall Librarv V. 



J Highways A 



/ Assessors V. 



Annual Report 
of the 

Town of Andover 
for the 



1972 



Fiscal year 




prepared by the 
Town Manager 



Pursuant to the Provisions of 

Chapter 40, Section 49 

of the General Laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

and Article II, Section 4 

of the By-Laws of the 

Town of Andover. 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 
01810 



February 14, 1973 



Town Hall 
20 Main Street 



TO THE CITIZENS OF ANDOVER: 

The Board of Selectmen is pleased to submit to you the 1972 Annual Report 
which is a compilation of activities of each department and board. 

Without question the one problem the Board of Selectmen has been most 
concerned with during the past year is the disposal of our solid waste. 
Many hours have been spent in trying to find a workable solution to the 
closing of our present dump site on Chandler Road. 

Our March, 1973, Town Meeting, after considering several alternatives, 
must set a policy for solving this difficult and sometimes emotional 
problem. The Board agrees that the long term solution to the solid waste 
disposal problem lies in a regional approach which must be developed in 
collaboration with responsible officials in adjacent communities. 

As we enter 1973, Andover will be facing another extremely important de- 
cision concerning the future of our industrial development. The decision 
to sewer or not to sewer our industrial land will have as far reaching 
effect on all aspects of our community as any we know of in recent years. 

Andover, with all its problems and difficulties, will continue to be a 
leader in all aspects of good community living. Andover is willing to 
move ahead of the crowd, with the results historically being, A Good 
Place to Live ! 

As we face new challenges in the year ahead, we will be without the ser- 
vices of Selectman Robert A. Wrtters who has announced that he will re- 
tire at the end of his present term. We, as a Board, wish to pay special 
tribute to Mr. Watters for his untiring efforts as a devoted servant of 
the Town for the past ten years and wish him good health in the years to 
come. 

Remember, the Town of Andover will benefit most of all in the future by 
your presence at Town Meeting. Please plan to attend. 



Respectfully submitted, 



■pw ttj 




RogeayW. Collins 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 



RWC:bg 



Board of Selectmen 



The Board of Selectmen had twenty-two regular meetings and thirteen special 
meetings during 1972. The members held numerous conferences with Town Boards, Com- 
mittees, and Officials. The Conservation Commission conferred with the Board sev- 
eral times during the year to seek agreement regarding the amount the Commission 
would offer property owners for land for which Town Meeting had authorized acquisi- 
tion for conservation purposes. 

In March, 1972, Robert A. Watters was reelected chairman, Roger W. Collins was 
reelected vice-chairman, and George E. Heseltine was reelected secretary. Milton 
Greenberg began his second year as a member of the Board, and Alan French joined the 
Board following his election to a three-year term. 

Following is a list of some of the major decisions and actions taken by the 
Board of Selectmen during the year: 

APPOINTMENTS 

Approved Town Manager appointments to various positions, boards, and committees in- 
cluding the Shawsheen-Doherty School Building Committee, Chairman of the Andover 
Recreation and Open Space Advisory Committee, Director of Recreation/Community 
Schools, a new Town Counsel, a Director of Public Health, and a Water and Sewer Sup- 
erintendent . 

TRAFFIC 

Voted to disapprove a request that Harding Street be made one-way between Main 
Street and High Street. 

Removed the NO PARKING ban on one side of Barnard Street behind the Town Hall. 

LIMOUSINE SERVICE 

Granted to Hudson Bus Lines authorization to travel over certain streets in Andover 
thus allowing the inauguration of a limousine service from the Rolling Green Motor 
Inn to Logan Airport. 

ASSISTANT TOWN MANAGER 

Went on record as supporting an assistant to the Town Manager with the view of 
seeking an appropriation of funds for that position at the 1973 Annual Town Meeting. 

WATER RATES 

Established the policy of reviewing the water rates annually and set the amount to 
be raised by the sale of water and by the levying of betterments at a two-year aver- 
age of 70% of the cost of operating the department, payment for debt service, and 
water improvement projects. 

SOLID WASTE 

Voted to have an investigation into the possibility of charging industry for the 
disposal of its solid waste in the Town's sanitary landfill. 

SIGNIFICANT HEARINGS 

Merrimack College Infirmary sewer connection. 

Mosquito Control. 



HOUSING 

Went on record as favoring low-income housing and pledged its assistance to the 
Andover Housing Authority in its efforts to secure a site on which to construct up to 
fifty units of low-income housing. 

REGIONAL PLANNING 

Designated Selectman Roger Collins as the Board's representative on the Subregional 
Joint Transportation Planning Committee of the Merrimack Valley Regional Planning 
Commission. 

LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Granted renewal of all kinds of licenses and approved numerous pole locations and 
street opening permits . 

Renewed two gravel removal permits. 

Approved two All Alcoholic Liquor Licenses for locations at which similar licenses 
had been held in the past by other owners. 

Granted two new Wine and Malt Beverage Package Store Licenses. 

Town Manager 

EEA 



Andover has capitalized on the availability of the Emergency Employment Act 
Funds, beginning in the fall of 1971. This program made possible the employment of 
a much needed Administrative Assistant (Management Aide) to the Town Manager, a 
full-time Planner, a Federal/State Aid Coordinator, a Community Organizer concen- 
trating on drug problems, a second custodian for the Town Hall-Police Station, an 
attendant for the recycling program at the landfill, and two laborers in the De- 
partment of Public Works. Efficiently providing the secretarial needs of the Man- 
agement Aide, Town Planner, and the Federal/State Aid Coordinator has been Mrs. 
Allen Copeland. Miss Betsy Poynter has assisted the Planner in numerous short and 
long range planning projects, beginning in the summer of 1972. 

Israel Lichtman, Management Aide, was assigned responsibilities in personnel, 
including the handling of all Civil Service matters with the State office in Boston, 
and in purchasing. In addition, numerous short studies were undertaken by him to 
provide information necessary in decision making by the Selectmen and the Town Man- 
ager. Mr. Lichtman' s resignation to accept permanent employment was a loss to the 
Manager and to the Town administration. 

John Lewis, the Federal/State Aid Coordinator, has quietly and effectively 
handled many projects. Through his efforts two Federal grants were obtained under 
the LEAA program totalling over $5,000. He assisted school officials in developing 
a program for possible Federal funding for trainable mentally retarded youth and 
young adults and a Career Education Proposal. He served as coordinator for the ac- 
quisition and the installation of a police telephone and radio monitoring system at 
a moderate price. A new piece of equipment with equivalent capabilities would have 
cost the Town at least $6,000 more. 

Through Mr. Lewis's efforts, Andover was able to participate in the Federal 
Surplus Property program and obtain items for the School Department, Police Depart- 
ment, Recreation/Community Schools, Public Works, Civil Defense, Town Hall, and the 
Andover Storefront. This property included fireproof filing cabinets, electronic 
equipment, office furniture, lounge furniture, tools, Army trailers, and books. Ac- 
quisition through this program has resulted in substantial monetary savings for the 
Town. 

Mr. Lewis assisted DPW Director McQuade in the study of solid waste collection 



and disposal and recycling. Other assignments included maintenance of a log of 
legal cases pending against the Town of Andover, compilation of a list of tax title 
land, compilation of the State Statutes accepted by the Town, purchase of air 
conditioners for several Town offices, lighting for the Accounting Office, a new 
copy machine for the Town Offices, and specifications for the printing of the Town 
Warrant and the Town Report. 

The services of Will Harvey, Community Organizer, were also acquired under the 
EEA program. Aimed at the drug problem, Mr. Harvey has established a comprehensive 
youth-in-crisis program, with an office in a building in Shawsheen Plaza. A report 
of the Drug Organizer's activities is included further on in this Annual Report. 

During 1972 the Town Planner, Joseph Schall, Jr., undertook studies, research, 
and analysis required by the Planning Board; assisted the Town Manager on planning 
questions; monitored progress and contributed to the numerous planning consultant 
studies under contract by the Town; and provided planning information to the public. 

The Town Planner prepared revisions to portions of the Zoning Bylaw. Some of 
the modifications were in direct response to recent zoning problems, such as the 
provision to allow animal hospitals at appropriate locations, satisfying the needs of 
the practitioner and the community, subject to regulations and restrictions clearly 
specified. A bylaw pertaining to areas subject to flooding was prepared for incor- 
poration into the Zoning Bylaws. 

The Town Planner also assisted the Planning Board in the preparation of position 
statements on planning and zoning articles in the Warrant for Town Meeting. 

The Planning Intern, Miss Poynter, has spent a major portion of her time re- 
vising an Existing Land Use Map that shows all development (residential, commercial, 
and business) in Town since a similar map was prepared in 1965. 

RECREATION/COMMUNITY SCHOOLS 

The Community School Study Committee appointed on November 8, 1971, recommended 
that the Recreation Department's functions be expanded to include the coordination 
of the use of the Town's public school facilities by youth and adult groups after 
regular school hours and the sponsorship of such leisure time activities as the cit- 
izens of various ages may wish to support by participation. This proposal included 
the continuation of such existing programs as the summer playgrounds, Pomps Pond 
swimming, ice skating, and the like. The Board of Selectmen accepted the report and 
extended the life of the Committee to enable it to aid the Town Manager in recruiting 
the first Director. Andover thus embarked on a new concept for providing leisure 
time activities for its citizens. It is an exciting venture in the use of school fa- 
cilities in addition to the Town's meager indoor facilities. This was possible only 
through the support and encouragement of the School Committee and School Superinten- 
dent Kenneth Seifert. 

Gary Ralph, former Superintendent of Parks and Recreation of Irvington-on-the- 
Hudson, New York, was appointed Recreation/Community Schools Director on June 26, 
1972. Since his arrival in Andover in July, he has demonstrated that he is a capable, 
energetic, and resourceful director. The number of programs available to the towns- 
people has multiplied many fold, serving a wide variety of interests. 

BEHIND THE TAX RATE 

Every taxpayer looks for the year when the tax rate will drop or at least not 
rise. Unfortunately, this has occurred few times in the past fifteen years. Is it 
the fault of the elected officials, the administration? The Town Manager thinks not. 
The answer lies to a considerable degree outside of Andover. External forces are at 
work which have a marked effect on the services a town government must provide. 

A look at these external forces at work here helps to explain to a considerable 
degree the causes of our rising tax rate. First is inflation. This is reflected 
locally through increased costs for wages, salaries, equipment, supplies, and mate- 
rials. Another is the national demand for better and more innovative education. 



This finds a receptive audience in a community such as Andover. It is reflected in 
the growth in the number and type of educational programs and the need to update our 
educational facilities. 

The national awareness of the deterioration of our environment has been re- 
flected here in the State's demand for the elimination of pollution of the Merrimack 
River by way of sewage. Consequently, the necessity arises for the construction of 
the Regional Sewage Treatment Plant. It is also reflected in the State's increasing 
pressure over the years for the Town to cease air and water pollution by the opera- 
tion of an open face dump on a tributary to a stream which is a source of the Town's 
drinking water. It manifests itself in the program of the Conservation Commission 
to require land for conservation purposes. 

The nationwide drug problem is reflected in several drug related problems with 
our youth and the cause of a substantial increase in the incidents of breaking, en- 
tering, and larceny in our homes. 

Communities along the Merrimack River and elsewhere in eastern Massachusetts 
led Andover until just recently in the reduction of hours of the policemen and fire- 
fighters. Such reduction in hours recently has made it mandatory that the Town in- 
crease the personnel in these departments. 

The growth of the population in the Nation's suburbs has affected Andover 's 
population irregardless of the growth in Andover 's industrial plants. Fortunately, 
this has been more moderate than in many communities. It has, however, required the 
improvement of the Town's water system, need for additional public safety personnel, 
additional mileage of Town roads and streets for year-round maintenance. Growth has 
also necessitated the strengthening of the Town's inspection services by the addition 
of personnel. 

More leisure time for a better educated and more highly motivated populace has 
led to the need for Town sponsored leisure time activities. 

Andover is part of the Nation, part of the Commonwealth, and part of Northern 
Essex County. National, area, and regional trends are reflected here and ultimately 
in your tax rate. 

INDUSTRIAL GROWTH 

To partially offset the rising costs of local government, Andover has been for- 
tunate in acquiring a number of industries and having the ability to hold several 
others. Allied Chemical, Brockway-Smith, Gillette, and Raytheon were made possible 
by the farsighted and clear thinking officials and voters in investing in the in- 
stallation of the necessary utilities to enable these firms to locate here. Our 
1972 tax rate was $5.00 lower by reason of these investments in 1965, 1967, 1968, 
and 1969. 

The last major industrial plant was completed in Andover in 1970. That fact is 
reflected in the lack of growth of the percentage of taxes paid by industry in 1972 
over 1971. This percent rose from 6% in 1967 to 15% in 1971, and it remained there 
for 1972. This meant that the homeowners were paying 82% of the taxes in 1967 and 
only 74% in 1971 and 1972. The balance of the taxes was borne by commercial firms. 

The estimated value of the building permits issued in 1972 for 205 dwellings 
was $5,613,000, while the estimated cost of construction of new industrial plants 
was $352,500. This is an indicator that our population is growing even though our 
industrial growth is meager. 

If Andover voters want to continue to enjoy the level of town and school ser- 
vices with only modest tax rate increases, an additional investment in utilities for 
future industrial growth is needed now. 

SOLID WASTE 

It is unfortunate that the voters of the Town could not reach agreement as to 



where to dispose of its solid waste in 1972. Proposals for the acquisition of new 
sites were prepared and submitted to the voters twice. The majority of the voters 
present voted in favor of one of these proposals, but the necessary 2/3 vote was not 
obtained. Certainly in the life of a community this is not a great catastrophe, and 
a solution will ultimately be found. It has, however, caused this problem to be 
added to the other major matters requiring consideration at the 1973 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

It is understandable that residents in the general area of the proposed site of 
a new sanitary landfill would be apprehensive. The Town Manager feels that there 
was an over reaction to this proposal in view of the remoteness of the Cyr-Cronin- 
Brooks site and the fact that it would be operated as a true sanitary landfill — as 
is now being done at the present site. Residents of West Andover have had the annoy- 
ances of a disposal site in their area for approximately thirty-five years. They 
have endured the nuisances of smoke, rats, and blowing debris when the dump was op- 
erated as an open burning site. These annoyances have been essentially eliminated 
by the transition to a sanitary landfill type of operation. It is really not unfair 
to expect, for the benefit of all, that the residents of another section of Town ac- 
cept, on a temporary basis, a sanitary landfill operated in a proper manner. 

PERSONNEL 

The Town Manager does not believe in the common practice of adding to the end 
of each department's annual report compliments and thanks to various Town officials 
for their cooperation during the preceding year. However, recognition of service to 
the community should not be overlooked. Few managers of communities of this size 
can boast of department heads as competent and diligent as ours, a credit to the 
former managers and the Boards of Selectmen. Citizens have relatively little oppor- 
tunity to observe the work habits of its public servants. Few realize that the 
hours worked by these men is considerably in excess of standard office hours. It is 
their dedication and perseverence that keeps the Town government operating smoothly 
and effectively. 



Town Counsel 



At the beginning of 1972, fifty-seven cases were pending. During the course of 
the year, twenty-one new cases arose as follows: 

7 Appellate Tax Board 
3 Zoning 

2 Public Liability 

3 Eminent Domain 

1 Contract 

3 Injunction 

2 Other 

During the year there were twenty-two appearances before courts and administra- 
tive boards. Written legal opinions were rendered on seventy-one subjects. 

Contracts were drawn and reviewed; and deeds, releases, and agreements were 
drafted. 

Oral opinions were given to the various Town departments; and in addition, 
Town Counsel appeared before the Board of Selectmen on many occasions and had con- 
ferences with the various departments of the Town. 



Town Clerk 



The total number of registered voters in Andover as of October 7, 1972 was 
14,087 by precincts as follows: 



1 — 2,448 

2 -- 1,349 

3 — 2,311 



4 — 3,448 

5 — 1,256 

6 — 3,275 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Number of births recorded 



Males 120 
Females 129 

Number of marriages recorded 

Number of deaths recorded 

Males 94 
Females 105 



249 

313 
199 



2,216 dogs were licensed and $7,264.00 was collected. Of this amount, 
$775.60 was turned over to the Town Treasurer and the balance sent to the County 
Treasurer. 

1,009 Hunting and Fishing Licenses were issued and $5,201.50 was collected. 
Of this amount, $235.00 was turned over to the Town Treasurer and the balance sent 
to the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Other monies collected were as follows: 

Marriage Intentions $ 524.00 

Certified copies-Vital Statistics 741.50 

Uniform Commercial Codes recorded 1,925.00 

Miscellaneous Licenses 456.00 

(Auctioneer, Junk, etc.) 

Alcoholic Beverages Licenses 17,035.00 

Business Certificates filed 87.00 

Miscellaneous (Storage of inflammables, 2,487.75 

street lists, maps, bylaws, etc.) 



Total monies collected were $36,732.35. 
deposited with the Town Treasurer. 



Of this amount, $24,266.85 was 



Animal Inspection 

Number of Cattle Inspected: Number of Goats Inspected .... 2 

Registered '. . Number of Swine Inspected .... 1,695 

Grade 92 Number of Barns (Dairy) 

Number of Sheep Inspected 8 Inspected .... 3 

Number of Horses Inspected Ill Number of Dogs Quarantined. ... 63 

Number of Ponies Inspected 41 Number of Dogs with Rabies. ... 

Since the Dog Officer has been on duty, there have been many less dog bites and 
complaints . 

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The 1972 real estate assessed value of $206,134,000 indicates an increase of 
$5,053,300 over the previous year and a total increase of $97,250,400 since 1967, 
the year of the last complete equalization program of the Town. 

The total assessed value of all taxable personal property in 1972 was 
$8,657,300, an increase of $330,900 over the previous year and an increase of 
$3,334,400 during the past five years. 

COMPARATIVE ASSESSING DATA 



1967 



1972 



SUMMARY REPORT 



Number of Accounts Assessed 
Valuation - Personal Property 
Valuation - Real Estate 
Total Valuation 
Tax Rate Per $1,000 Valuation 
Number of Dwellings Assessed 



8,653 
$ 6,729,600 
$ 158,227,700 
$ 164,957,300 
$ 25.00 

5,319 



9,037 
$ 8,657,300 
$ 206,134,000 
$ 214,791,300 
$ 50.00 

6,008 



TAX EXEMPTIONS GRANTED 



Clause 41 (Elderly) 
Clause 22 (Veterans) 
Clause 37 (Blind) 



$ 


50,938.33 


$ 


54,693.32 


$ 


14,583.50 


$ 


49,350.00 


$ 


450.00 


$ 


4,900.00 



REAL ESTATE EXEMPTIONS 



Property of the United States 

Property of Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Property of Literary Organizations 

Property of Charitable Organizations 

Property of Benevolent Organizations 

Houses of Religious Worship 

Parsonages 

Cemeteries 

Andover Housing Authority 

Property Put to a Public Use 

Property of a District 

Number of Acres Exempt 

Number of Accounts Exempt 



$ 


1,863,200 


$ 


1,881,700 


$ 


531,800 


$ 


532,700 


$ 


25,699,800 


$ 


28,041,400 


$ 


119,300 


$ 


106,800 


$ 


341,200 


$ 


506,600 


$ 


2,409,300 


$ 


2,572,200 


$ 


300,000 


$ 


239,900 


$ 


397,500 


$ 


300,400 


$ 


1,039,900 


$ 


1,516,700 


$ 


10,637,960 


$ 


15,967,100 


$ 


2,306,700 


$ 


3,782,900 




3,288.10 




3,788.43 




781 




753 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE 



Number of Vehicles Assessed 

Assessed Valuation 

Excise 

Abatements 

Tax Rate Per $1,000 

1972 Assessed Value 
1971 Assessed Value 



1972 Assessed Value 
1971 Assessed Value 



Real Estate 
Real Estate 

Increase 

Personal Property 
Personal Property 

Increase 



12,307 
$10,318,000.00 
$ 610,975.19 
$ 43,091.18 
$ 66.00 

$206,134,000.00 
201,080,700.00 

$ 5,053,300.00 

$ 8,657,300.00 
8,326,400.00 

$ 330,900.00 



10,504 

9,953,570.00 

578,372.93 

48,489.94 

66.00 



11 



RECAPITULATION 

Computations for Determining 1972 Tax Rate and Comparison with 1971 

APPROPRIATIONS 

1972 1971 

$13,913,587.78 $12,485,422.80 Appropriations approved at Annual Town Meeting 

97,350.00 93,555.00 Voted from available funds at Annual Town Meeting 
27,298.84 126,000.00 Voted from available funds at Special Town Meetings 
previous year 

$14,038,236.62 $12,704,977.80 TOTAL AMOUNT APPROPRIATED 

STATE AND COUNTY TAX ASSESSMENTS 

$ 274,388.08 $ 269,419.72 County Tax 

55,308.32 45,540.02 State Recreation Areas 
4,196.54 4,453.59 State Audit of Municipal Accounts 

194.40 1,372.94 State Examination of Retirement System 

1,840.97 1,324.17 Health Insurance - State Elderly Governmental 

Retiree Program 
2,358.60 2,477.40 Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 
3,009.18 2,414.10 Ipswich River Watershed District 

Underestimates - County Tax 
437.04 2,711.66 Underestimates - State Recreation 
206,576.54 266,342.43 OVERLAY 

$ 548,309.67 $ 596,056.03 GROSS AMOUNT NEEDED FROM ALL AVAILABLE SOURCES 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$ 1,871,216.13 $ 1,453,927.74 Estimated Receipts Certified by Commissioner 

663,000.00 658,000.00 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

14,000.00 15,000.00 Licenses 

1,500.00 2,000.00 Fines 

25,000.00 45,000.00 Special Assessments 

3,000.00 2,500.00 General Government 

30,000.00 20,000.00 Protection of Persons and Property 

1,500.00 2,000.00 Health and Sanitation 

100.00 600.00 Highways 

15,000.00 24,000.00 School (Local Receipts of School Committee) 

500.00 500.00 Libraries (Local Receipts Other Than State Aid) 

600,000.00 400,000.00 Public Service Enterprises (Such as Water Dept . ) 

5,000.00 6,500.00 Cemeteries (Other Than Trust Funds & Sale of Lots) 

30,000.00 70,000.00 Interest 

500.00 500.00 Farm Animal, Machinery and Equipment Excise 
1,500.00 1,500.00 Andover Housing Authority 

$ 3,261,816.13 $ 2,702,027.74 TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

OVERESTIMATES PREVIOUS YEAR 

$ 2,711.66 $ 3,823.36 County Tax 

AMOUNTS VOTED TO BE TAKEN FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$ 157,350.00 $ 103,555.00 Voted Regular Town Meeting 

27,298.84 126,000.00 Voted Special Town Meeting Previous Year 
500,000.00 800,000.00 Voted Regular Town Meeting to Reduce Tax Rate 

$ 684,648.84 $ 1,029,555.00 TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 



12 



NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION ON PROPERTY 

$ 10,739,607.00 $ 9,632,726.60 

VALUATION 

$ 8,657,300.00 $ 8,326,400.00 Valuation of Personal Property 
206,134,000.00 201,080,700.00 Valuation of Real Estate 

$214,791,300.00 $209,407,100.00 TOTAL 

TAX RATE 



29.32 
20.68 



27.18 School Rate 
18.82 General 



50.00 $ 



46.00 TOTAL TAX RATE 

TOTAL TAXES LEVIED 



$ 432,907.00 $ 383,014.40 Personal Property 
10,306,700.00 9,249,712.20 Real Estate 

$ 10,739,607.00 $ 9,632,726.60 TOTAL TAXES LEVIED ON PROPERTY 



$ 26,863.42 $ 
2,180.31 
16,018.50 



27,596.14 Sewer Betterments Added to Taxes 
2,441.70 Water Betterments Added to Taxes 
14,705.46 Water Liens Added to Taxes 



45,062.23 $ 



44,743.30 TOTAL ADDED TO TAXES 
VALUATION BREAKDOWN BY CLASS 
1972 



1971 







Total 


Percent 




Total 


Pe 


rcent 




Number 


Valuation 


Of 


Total 


Number 


Valuation 


Of 


Total 


Commercial 


173 


$ 23,190,800 




11 


179 


$ 23,069,300 




11 


Industrial 


72 


30,095,400 




15 


66 


29,612,100 




15 


Residential 


8,039 


152,847,800 




74 


7,890 


148,399,300 




74 


Total 


8,284 


$206,134,000 




100 


8,135 


$201,080,700 




100 






TEN TOP 


TAXPAYERS 


- 1972 









Endrock Associates & Raytheon Co. 

Gillette Company 

Massachusetts Electric Co. 

Phillips Academy 

Shetland Properties - Andover 

Sebago-Andover Realty Trust 

(Brockway-Smith ) 
The Franklin Trust 
John S. Frene (Andover Terrace) 
Melrand Trust (Washington Park) 
Lawrence Gas Company 



PERSONAL PROPERTY 
ASSESSED TAX 



$3,882,100 $194,105.00 
42,300 2,115.00 



REAL ESTATE 

ASSESSED TAX 

$12,909,500 $645,475.00 
7,019,900 350,995.00 



9,000 



20,000 

40,000 

1,557,400 



450.00 



1,000.00 

2,000.00 

77,870.00 



82,600 
2,658,200 
2,528,700 
2,04 0,000 

1,839,100 
1,823,900 
1,776,400 



4,130.00 
132,910.00 
126,435.00 
102,000.00 

91,955.00 
91,195.00 
88,820.00 



13 



Game Warden 



In the year 1972 the Game Warden's Department conducted approximately 420 
investigations of all types. In many cases written violations were given; and in 
the cases of snowmobile violations, many were referred to the Registry of Motor Ve- 
hicles for further action. Firearms taken were impounded for penalty periods. 

Once again there were cases of many species of wildlife removed from private 
residences; this was done in the most humane manner possible. Hunting pressure 
within the town was down this year because of a new Town Bylaw, and many hours of 
explanation and leg work was done by the Warden and his deputies. Most problems 
arise from hunters not knowing Town Bylaws or bothering to find out. It has been 
suggested to the State that their law folder which is issued with each license con- 
tain a list of towns and cities who have hunting restrictions. In addition, this 
Department recommends that the now in force bylaw of the Town of Andover be repro- 
duced and passed out at the Town Clerk's office with each license issued. 

The local officers have participated in Hunter Safety Education and the safe 
handling of firearms. Warden Forrest Noyes and Deputy Warden James Deyermond have 
been appointed Certified Instructors by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department 
of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division. They received letters of congratula- 
tion together with very colorful Commonwealth of Massachusetts shoulder patches. 

The Department once again would like to take this opportunity to thank Chief David L. 
Nicoll and his men for the fine cooperation given during the past year. 



Dog Officer 



Lost Dogs 128 

Dogs Found 73 

Dogs Ordered Restrained 44 

Dog Complaints 444 

Dogs Sold 31 

Money Turned in to Town Treasurer - Dogs Sold $93.00 

Owners Contacted for Having Unlicensed Dogs . . 401 

Cats Turned in to Pound 119 

Various Dead Animals Picked Up 117 

Impounded Dogs (Unlicensed) 100 

Impounded Dogs (Licensed) 8 



Police Department 



In 1972 calls for police action either by complaint or request rose to a new 
high. Ther^ were 6,443 of such complaints/requests, an increase of 785 over 1971, 

14 



Housebreaks continue to be one of the greatest problems of the Police Department 
During 1972 there were 232 actual breaks and 32 attempted breaks reported to the De- 
partment. This is 49 actual breaks and 9 attempted breaks more than in 1971. One 
method of combatting these housebreaks, known as Operation Identification, is avail- 
able to residents of Andover through the Police Department. Electric pencils are 
loaned out to any resident who wishes to mark items most likely to be stolen, such 
as T.V. sets, cameras, stereos, etc. A window sticker stating that such valuables 
are so marked notifies would-be breakers that disposing of such items would be much 
harder, as the articles would be more easily traced. Operation Identification has 
been very successful in other sections of the country, and the citizens of Andover 
should avail themselves of this method of assisting the police in an attempt to stop 
this type of crime. 

In 1972 there were 110 cases of larceny of property valued at over $50, 23 less 
than in 1971. Thefts of property valued at less than $50 amounted to 233, which is 
68 less cases than in 1971. Included in the 233 cases of less than $50 thefts were 
97 bicycles, 35 less than in 1971. 

The Police Department issued 3,434 parking tickets in 1972. This represents an 
increase of 1,769 over the year 1971. With more and more industries locating in the 
old Raytheon property, the parking situation is again becoming a problem. Traffic 
has also increased in that area, especially the Shawsheen Square section. The re- 
opening of the bridge at Kenilworth Street and Riverina Road would greatly ease this 
traffic problem. 

In 1972 there were 782 motor vehicle accidents reported in Andover, an increase 
of 71 over the year 1971. There were 7 fatal accidents, 221 personal injury acci- 
dents, and 574 property damage accidents. Four of the fatalities reported took 
place on Route 93, one of Route 495, and the other two on Andover streets; one of 
these was a pedestrian accident. Of the 782 accidents reported, 110 occurred on 
Route 93 and 70 on Route 495. 

In 1972, 800 court cases were prosecuted by the Police Department, an increase 
of 352 over the year 1971. Of the 800 cases handled, 471 were motor vehicle viola- 
tions, of which 255 were for speeding and 35 were for driving while intoxicated. An- 
other large item in the arrest category is the crime of drunkneness, 126 cases being 
disposed of. However, in July of 1973, drunkenness will no longer be treated as a 
crime, so this total should drop considerably in 1973. 

A total of 25 juvenile arrests were made by the Police Department in 1972. 
There were 49 drug arrests made in 1972, 9 less than 1971. 

Police cars travelled a distance of 339,846 miles during the year. 

The following comparison chart shows major police activities for the past five 
years : 

1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 

Complaints 

Breaking and Entering 

Larceny: Over $50.00 

Under $50.00 
Stolen Cars 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 
Motor Vehicle Injuries 
Motor Vehicle Deaths 
Motor Vehicle Violations 
Cruiser Mileage 320,679 328,089 328,722 333,895 339,846 

15 



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4,481 


4,959 


5,658 


6,443 


128 


155 


138 


183 


232 


100 


135 


128 


133 


110 


147 


189 


232 


301 


233 


40 


76 


43 


72 


58 


632 


614 


700 


711 


766 


283 


226 


258 


287 


292 


5 


6 


3 


3 


7 


464 


212 


148 


117 


205 





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16 



[ Fire Department 



The Fire Department is established and maintained by the municipality to provide 
protection to the public against injury and loss of life or property by fire, explo- 
sion, or other causes. 

Because of the importance and the hazardous nature of this work, the fire- 
fighter engaged in it must possess stamina and courage of the highest order. In ad- 
dition, however, he must possess certain specific knowledge concerning his work if 
he is to perform his duties efficiently and with minimum knowledge of the dangers 
arising from heat, smoke, explosions, etc., caused by fire; of the hazards presented 
by new industries, processes, and materials developed by science; of the construc- 
tion of buildings and the hazards involved in the materials used or stored in them; 
and of the dangers inherent in the use of water at high pressures. 

Objectives of fire protection are to prevent fire from starting, to prevent 
loss of life and property in case a fire starts, to confine fire to the place of or- 
igin, and to extinguish it. 

From the point of view of Town Government, this involves the services of fire 
prevention and fire fighting. Fire fighting, because it requires positive and dram- 
atic action, has a far greater appeal for people than have fire prevention measures 
which involve restrictions, prohibitions, and administrative "interference" with 
what are termed "individual rights." 

The Fire Department installs, repairs, and maintains a coded fire alarm system 
comprising some three million feet of wiring, both aerial and underground, and as- 
sociated street boxes and station equipment for controlling the system. The Depart- 
ment operates from three stations — Central, Ballardvale, and West Andover. Its 
fifty-one men use six pieces of fire fighting equipment. 

Quarterly inspections of nursing homes, hospitals, and inns, as required by 
State Statutes, were conducted, and the necessary reports filed with the proper au- 
thorities. Public and private school fire drills and inspections required by law 
were conducted. Mercantile, industrial, church, garage, and service station inspec- 
tions were conducted, and reports were filed. Findings and recommendations were 
sent to owners and/or occupants of dwelling houses of three or more apartments. In- 
service inspections were conducted from all stations using radio-controlled fire 
trucks and a full complement of fire fighters. 

As in past years, the major causes of fire were carelessness, the misuse of 
smoking materials, children and matches, and faulty electrical appliances and wiring 

FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 

1972 1971 1970 

Service Calls 1,638 1,777 1,672 

Fires 381 432 493 

False Alarms 37 51 43 

Mutual Aid Calls 11 7 3 

Approximate Value of 
Buildings Where a $83,432,500.00 $34,380,440.00 $32,195,965.00 
Fire Occurred 

Approximate Loss 
from Fire $103,868.92 $121,127.25 $862,505.27 

17 



1972 1971 1970 

Ambulance Calls 568 554 548 

Non-residents Billed 
for Ambulance Service 178 167 140 

Fuel Oil Heat Installation 
Permits Issued 100 100 92 

Explosive Use Permits 
Issued 15 20 19 

Building Inspections 934 932 926 

Fire Drills 124 115 147 

Fatalities from Fire 

Flammable Liquids or 
Explosive Storage 
Permits Issued 21 33 10 

Welding and Cutting 
Operation Permits Issued 9 6 8 

Fireworks Display Permits 
Issued 2 1 

Rocketry Permits Issued 52 36 27 

Permits to Abandon 

Underground Tanks Issued 2 2 3 



Authority 



In the year 1972 the Andover Housing Authority held many meetings and attended 
a number of meetings on housing held by organizations and the Department of Community 
Affairs . 

The Authority entered into a Contract for Financial Assistance with the Depart- 
ment of Community Affairs for the new elderly housing project, 667-3, to be located 
on North Main Street. The contract, in the amount of $1,600,000, was signed on 
October 4; and notes in that amount were sold on November 8 at 3.04% interest plus a 
premium of $40.00. All but $25,040 of this sum has been invested in area banks, and 
construction is expected to begin shortly. 

The Authority has submitted a request for financial assistance to construct or 
renovate existing buildings for lower income family apartments under Chapter 705, 
Acts of 1966. The Department of Community Affairs examined Temple Place and has 
taken it under advisement. Approval of the old town dump on High Street for not 
more than eight units was received subject to the Town's transferring the land to 
the Authority. The October, 1972, Special Town Meetirg authorized such a transfer 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen. In January, 1973, the Selectmen voted 
4 to 1 to retain the land for use as a snow dump. The Authority is continuing to 
look for suitable sites for scattered low-income housing which will meet with State 
approval and the approval of Town Boards and Officials. 

During 1972 the Authority executed a number of contracts. These included a 
contract for legal services, a contract for architectural services, and two appraisal 
contracts for Project 667-3, a modernization contract and a contract for replacement 
of two oil burners at the Project 200-1. 

18 



A request for modernization funds to construct a new heating system, install 
storm windows, replace refrigerators and stoves, and construct recreation facilities 
and equipment has been submitted to the Department of Community Affairs by the And- 
over Tenants' Organization and the Housing Authority. 

VETERANS' PROJECT 200-1 

Eight new families moved into the project this year, and two families moved 
within the project. There are 28 eligible applicants on a waiting list. 

Yearly income limits for admittance are: two or less minor dependents, $6,500: 
three or more minor dependents, $7,500. Continued occupancy limits are $7,500 and 
$8,500. The average monthly rental, including utilities, is $89.00. 

Payment in lieu of taxes to the Town was $2,016.00 for the year. 

Following is a summary statement of income and expenses for the Veterans' Proj- 
ect for the last fiscal year. 

Income 

Rents and Interest $63,237.21 

State Aid 23,301.95 $86,539.16 

Expense 

Management Expense 10,712.99 

Utilities 21,669.08 

Repairs, Maintenance and Replacements 10,741.55 

Insurance 2,040.54 

Contributions to Pension Funds 2,227.00 

Payment in Lieu of Taxes 2,016.00 

Reserves 4,704.00 

Debt Service 23,301.95 77,413.11 

Surplus $ 9,126.05 

Project Expense from Operating Reserves $14,210.27 
Less Surplus 9,126.05 

Deficit $ 5,084.22 

ELDERLY HOUSING PROJECTS 667-1 and 667-2 

The yearly income limits for admission are: for one person, $3,500; for two 
persons, $4,000. Continued occupancy limits are $4,000 and $4,500. The averave 
monthly rental is $46.00. 

Following is a summary statement of Income and Expense for the fiscal year ending 
12/31/72. 

Income 

Rents and Interest $47,439.09 

State Aid 52,681.33 

Surplus ( 3,485.12 $96,63 5.30 



Expenses 



Management Expense 8,146.20 

Utilities 16,499.32 

Repairs and Maintenance 8,427.78 

Insurance and Pension Fund 3,195.00 

Accruals 7,667.00 

Debt Service Requirements 52,700.00 $96,635.30 



19 



Historical Commission 



The Andover Historical Commission, consisting of seven members, has held 
monthly meetings at the Memorial Hall Library. Foremost in the minds of its members 
has been the mandatory duty to preserve, promote, and develop Andover 's historic as- 
sets. With this a criterion, the Commission felt that the Benjamin Abbot House on 
Andover Street should be protected by being placed on the National Register. Pre- 
liminary reports have been compiled to make this possible and will be submitted to 
Mrs. George F. Amadon , the Regional Director of the Essex County Preservation Plan- 
ning Board. 

The Commission is studying the advisability of preparing a booklet showing local 
historic landmarks, houses, etc., with the 200th Anniversary of the Declaration of 
Independence in mind. 



AVIS 



Miss Rebekah L. Taft, previously a resident of Andover, and a former Trustee of 
the Andover Village Improvement Society (AVIS), now living in Colorado Springs, Col- 
orado, has made a very significant contribution to conservation in Andover by estab- 
lishing the "Amy Gordon Taft Memorial Reservation" in memory of her mother who was a 
sincere lover of nature in all its forms. The Reservation comprises a 30j acre par- 
cel of land located along the easterly side of Andover Bypass, Route #125, between 
Wildwood Road on the south and Vine Street on the north. The land is wooded and in- 
cludes a small pond and a marshy area. 

Miss Taft has initially deeded to AVIS a 4^ acre portion of the Reservation 
fronting on Vine Street and has expressed her intention of deeding subsequent por- 
tions to AVIS in later years. In the meantime, she has leased to AVIS that part of 
the Reservation of which she presently retains ownership, so that the entire Reserva- 
tion is now open to the public under the management of AVIS. Trails are presently 
being considered, and these will be laid out definitely in the spring. 

As reported last year, the Society of the Friars Minor of the Order of Saint 
Francis has kindly given permission to install a trail, to be named the "St. Francis 
Trail," in its wooded land along the Merrimack River. There was no access to this 
proposed trail because the property of the electric companies, over which their power 
lines passed, was located between the upstream end of Deer Jump Reservation and the 
Friars' land. Fortunately, negotiations between AVIS and the New England Power Com- 
pany and the Massachusetts Electric Company, joint owners of the land in question, 
have resulted in these companies generously granting to AVIS a lease on 16.7 acres 
of their intervening land, so that a trail can now be laid out connecting the up- 
stream end of Deer Jump Reservation with the St. Francis Trail. This opens up for 
trail purposes somewhat more than another half mile of river frontage. Added to the 
present trail through Deer Jump Reservation, this gives a full three miles of Merri- 
mack Riverfront trail made available to the public. 

On May 6, 1972, AVIS held its second Annual Canoe Day on the Shawsheen River; 
the event was ably managed by AVIS Trustee, Peter Q. McKee . Canoe races were held 
along the Shawsheen River and Vale Reservations of AVIS from Ballardvale to the 
Central Street bridge. A large number of persons, including many family groups pic- 
nicking on the Shawsheen River Reservation, attended the outing. A feature of the 
day was the presentation of the "Selectmen's Award" by Selectman George E. HeseltLne . 
The award was presented to the winners of the open race. 

The Annual Camporee of the Shawsheen District of the North Essex Council of the 
Boy Scouts was held for a second time at the AVIS Harold R. Rafton Reservation on 
the weekend of October 6-8. Again, through the kindness of L. John Davidson, 

20 



Duncan, Jr., the Secretary of the Board of Trustees for several years, submitted her 
resignation effective December 31, 1972, because of a change in Mr. Duncan's job 
which required the moving of the family away from Andover . The Trustees do not em- 
ploy the services of an Executive Director or Secretary, and Mrs. Duncan's contribu- 
tion was invaluable in keeping straight the details and records of the cases under 
consideration. Because of this and her conscientious and intelligent approach to 
each individual case situation, her services will be greatly missed. 



Memorial Hall Library 



Memorial Hall Library has never been more attuned to, and more in touch with, the 
community, both inside and outside its walls. In the past few years, and particu- 
larly in the past twelve months, its every step has been to temper itself towards 
the goals of greater public service. The philosophy of service quoted in a variety 
of sources has guided this institution's growth and its response to contemporary 
needs and conditions for over one hundred years. This philosophy continues to be 
one of the best guides through the turbulence and the debate over goals and purposes 
affecting much of American life today. The Library is confident that its goal of 
"service" will remain a valid objective for constructive development in the future. 

SERVING THE COMMON GOOD 

Institutions such as this one that serve the common good are so tightly woven into 
the fabric of American life that people tend to take them for granted. Elsewhere in 
the world responsibility for the educational, cultural, and recreational needs, as 
well as the people's general welfare, is usually an exclusive government function. 
This country tradition of shared responsibility between the public and private sec- 
tors has produced institutions such as this one that have advanced in impressive 
ways the humanizing goals of American society and the common aspirations of its people. 

Memorial Hall Library is one example among many of an essentially public institution 
founded out of personal need and impulse painstakingly built over many years by sev- 
eral generations of Trustees and staff, each adding services and facilities until 
eventually the institution comes to perform an indispensable public service and to 
hold a broad public trust. It is impossible to calculate the energy, talent, and re- 
sources that have contributed to the development of the nation by our institutions 
and private initiative on behalf of the commonweal. 

Recognition of these basic historical facts is essential to an understanding of both 
the strengths and the problems of the library today, of its place in society, and of 
what it is best competent and equipped to do. 

EVENTS OF THE YEAR 

Certainly the last twelve months was a period of great activity, of further clarifi- 
cation of programs and objectives -- a period in which the Library was strengthened 
in all its aspects. Memorial Hall Library's single most important accomplishment was 
the advent of a daily delivery service that brings to the community virtually all the 
resources of the largest public and private institutions in the Commonwealth. One of 
the most significant responsibilities of the Library is to offer information to the 
widest possible audience. In this dimension there has not been total success. The 
most prominent reasons for not attaining complete success are in the increased cost 
of materials, need for additional space, and inability to reach all of the members of 
the community. Attempts are constantly made to make use of new ideas and techniques, 
experimenting, weeding out, searching for ways to enrich the Library and its meaning 
for people. For example, a business collection to be shelved separately which will 
serve the needs of the business community is now being planned. 

Another outstanding accomplishment for the year has been the success achieved in ser- 
ving the shut-ins and aged. More comprehensive services have been brought about with 
special programs, more varied reading materials, and reader service. The Library is 
now negotiating with the Council on Aging to offer referral services to the aged that 
will result in more comprehensive health and welfare programs to be provided by State 

25 



institutions. The Library will be the vehicle that will be used to connect the 
services with the recipient. 

The referral service that was instituted to bring volunteers and philanthropic groups I 
together has been a huge success. Some of the most powerful programs offered have 
been the May Festival, complimented by the International Tea, and a discussion series | 
in the Arts and Humanities. Concert series and lecture series were culminated with 
seminars directed by educators from nearby community colleges. These programs are 
indicative of the Library's efforts in the area of education on all levels as it con- 
tinues to become a more aggressive educational center and a forum for the community. 

The scholarship of the staff of Memorial Hall Library is a deciding factor in this 
effort. The Library continues to attract first-rate minds who know how to make the 
collection intelligible and rewarding to the readers. Bibliographic assistance and 
reader advisory service are regular functions of the professional staff. 

In a real sense librarians share with universities and colleges a responsibility for 
preserving and passing from generation to generation knowledge and experience pains- 
takingly acquired over the centuries. They preserve the glories of the past which 
are necessary if people are to keep a sense of perspective about themselves in the 
present, especially a present of quick and perplexing change. Memorial Hall Library 
is thus an essentially educational institution. For whatever other reasons the Li- 
brary collects, preserves, and displays materials, it does so out of a conviction 
that these materials will teach something worth knowing and that this knowledge is 
indispensable to the perception of an enlightened society, one that will face and 
solve its problems. It is to serve these purposes that a great deal of money must be 
spent today on a highly trained staff and upon adequate materials and a facility for 
programs. For the first time the budget contains a section entitled "Programs." It 
reflects the predominent degree to which the Library's resources of time, funds, and 
energy are now devoted to a broad local community of interests. A public library 
must realize when preparing its budget from year to year that it must support and im- 
plement the expansion of its program of public service. Administration realizes full 
well that there is a limit to how far it may proceed in taxing the community for li- 
brary service. However, the needs are many, and the community continues to grow. If 
Memorial Hall Library is to continue to possess its long and proud tradition for pub- 
lic service, the townspeople must support it as a "first priority." 

CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS 

Clearly some fundamental reassessment of cultural institutions as economic and social 
entities is in order and overdue. 

Fundamental changes in the nature of the American economy and society have resulted 
in increased demands made upon libraries without encouraging new means of support. 
Fortunately, enlightened concern is growing among leaders of government. Revenue 
Sharing recently enacted by the Federal Government places support of public libraries 
in "priority." State Grant-in-Aid has increased recently from 25£ per capita to 37 j£ 
per capita. 

The Eastern Massachusetts Regional Library System is growing with expanded services 
in the offing. Mutual cooperation of libraries in contiguous communities is being 
encouraged by the Commissioners of the Bureau of Library Extension. Such cooperation 
will improve library service and will help to defray costs of library service. In 
the meantime, the growth in this institution's value to society and its continued re- 
sponse to contemporary needs goes forward unabated. 

The continuance of technological advances and medical successes which result in ex- 
tended longevity and more leisure time for self-improvement all promote the need and 
insure the presence of libraries in the future. 

The fervent wish of Memorial Hall Library is to serve the whole community. This ob- 
jective cannot be accomplished alone, but with everyone working together, success will 
come. 



26 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 
Adult 



Juvenile 



REGISTRATION OF BORROWERS 

BOOK STOCK AND USE 

Vols, at end of reporting year 
Vols, added 
Vols, withdrawn 
Vols circulated 
(Incl. periodicals & 
pamphlets) 

PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS 

Subscriptions 
Gifts 

AUDIO-VISUAL 

Framed Reproductions 

and Sculpture Pieces 
Records 

Slides, filmstrips 
Microfilm (reels) 
Films (reels) 

GRAND TOTAL CIRCULATION: 

INTERLIBRARY LOAN 



1972 



3,213 



1971 



3,191 



1972 



1971 



1972 



1,204 4,000 4,417 



Total 
1971 

7,191 



84 , 176 


75,000 


24,813 


24,000 


108,989 


99,000 


9,176 


10,450 


813 


1,600 


9,989 


12,050 


4,667 


1,587 


263 


450 


4,930 


2,037 



203,922 193,323 88,159 86,550 292,081 279,873 



450 
50 



415 
54 



Owned at end of 
reporting year 



277 
4,597 

310 
2,967 

164 



228 
3,600 

310 
2,887 

118 



310,955 (1) 

1971 



Books borrowed from other libraries 216 

Books loaned to other libraries 2,633 

ACTIVITY GROUPS 

Adult Programs 25 

Story Hours 15 

Preschool Programs 86 

School Class Visits 16 
Other Juvenile Programs (Art, Music, 

Poetry, Crafts, etc.) 75 

PERSONNEL 

Total Budget $266,767 

Personnel Services 185,187 

Personnel as percent of Total Budget 67% 

Full-time Personnel 20 

Part-time Personnel ( = 12 full-time) 42_ 

Total Personnel 62 

PER CAPITA (based on 1970 census, 23,695 population) 



BOOK STOCK 
CIRCULATION OF BOOKS 



4.1 
12.33 



30 



29 



Added 
during year 

49 

584 



80 

46 



1972 

421 
5,348 



52 
15 
76 
18 

125 



$318,304 
226,966 

71% 

22 

40 

62 



2.1 
13.7 



480 444 
50 54 

Circulated 
during year 

815 

15,153 

190 

2,026 



(1) Statistics for the library's Ballardvale Branch are included in the general 

figures. The branch is open 10 hours per week, has a total book stock of 5,716 
In 1972 the total curculation of 9,668 included 4,863 Adult and 4,805 Juvenile. 



27 



Board of Health 



General: Total services rendered by the Board of Health during the year 1972 showed 
a significant increase over those rendered during the years 1970 and 1971. 

PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES AND HEALTH EDUCATION (See Table I) 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Public Health nursing services includes communicable disease control, child health 
dealing with infants and pre-schoolers, handicapped as well as school health, con- 
sultation services for day care centers, and nursing homes as well as referrals to 
other agencies. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL 

Tuberculosis: Tuberculosis continues to decline through vigilant follow-up and 
screening by Mantoux Skin Testing and Tine Skin Testing. The current Tuberculo- 
static drugs have revolutionized the care and treatment of Tuberculosis. There was 
one active case reported in Andover in 1972. Tuberculostatic drugs were supplied to 
the patient with follow-up by the Public Health Nurse and the Lawrence Tuberculosis 
Clinic. There were eleven patients on Tuberculostatic drugs and Chemophrophylactic 
Isoniazid in 1972, and the nurse was responsible for helping patients obtain medica- 
tion and for checking them while they were on the medication. Numerous inactive pa- 
tients and positive skin reactors were checked by the nurse. She also did Mantoux 
skin testing for the Nursing Home personnel and Andover residents who need this as a 
prerequisite for employment. 

Other Communicable Diseases: Forty-six cases of mumps were individually followed 
up as were six cases of salmonella and one case of shigella. The necessary epidemi- 
ological information on each case was forwarded to the State Department of Public 
Health. 

CHILD HEALTH 

Premature babies, whose parents reside in Andover, are visited to determine future 
health care of infant and also any needs the family might have pertaining to the 
health and welfare of the infant. 

St. Augustine's School Health Program was carried out by volunteer nurses and a vol- 
unteer dental hygienist under the supervision and direction of the Public Health 
Nurse. The program met all the State requirements for School Health. 

CONSULTATION 

State Public Health Standards are met in Nursing Homes by State Inspection along 
with another inspection by the local Health Department Nurse and Sanitarian. 

Nursery Schools are licensed by the Andover Board of Health. Seven nursery schools 
operated in Andover in 1972, and One group went through the licensing procedure; but 
because of legal difficulties did not follow through with the license. Visits to all 
nursery schools are made each year by the Public Health Nurse to ensure State Stan- 
dards are being met and to offer any assistance needed. 

OTHER SERVICES 

Certification of immunizations were down in 1972, probably due to a worldwide reduc- 
tion in communicable diseases such as smallpox. 

The number of biologicals dispensed in 1972 was slightly higher than in 1971. 

Diagnostic kits dispensed in 1972 were about 31% less than in 1971. 

28 



Duncan, Jr., the Secretary of the Board of Trustees for several years, submitted her 
resignation effective December 31, 1972, because of a change in Mr. Duncan's job 
which required the moving of the family away from Andover. The Trustees do not em- 
ploy the services of an Executive Director or Secretary, and Mrs. Duncan's contribu- 
tion was invaluable in keeping straight the details and records of the cases under 
consideration. Because of this and her conscientious and intelligent approach to 
each individual case situation, her services will be greatly missed. 



Hall Library 



Memorial Hall Library has never been more attuned to, and more in touch with, the 
community, both inside and outside its walls. In the past few years, and particu- 
larly in the past twelve months, its every step has been to temper itself towards 
the goals of greater public service. The philosophy of service quoted in a variety 
of sources has guided this institution's growth and its response to contemporary 
needs and conditions for over one hundred years. This philosophy continues to be 
one of the best guides through the turbulence and the debate over goals and purposes 
affecting much of American life today. The Library is confident that its goal of 
"service" will remain a valid objective for constructive development in the future. 

SERVING THE COMMON GOOD 

Institutions such as this one that serve the common good are so tightly woven into 
the fabric of American life that people tend to take them for granted. Elsewhere in 
the world responsibility for the educational, cultural, and recreational needs, as 
well as the people's general welfare, is usually an exclusive government function. 
This country tradition of shared responsibility between the public and private sec- 
tors has produced institutions such as this one that have advanced in impressive 
ways the humanizing goals of American society and the common aspirations of its people. 

Memorial Hall Library is one example among many of an essentially public institution 
founded out of personal need and impulse painstakingly built over many years by sev- 
eral generations of Trustees and staff, each adding services and facilities until 
eventually the institution comes to perform an indispensable public service and to 
hold a broad public trust. It is impossible to calculate the energy, talent, and re- 
sources that have contributed to the development of the nation by our institutions 
and private initiative on behalf of the commonweal. 

Recognition of these basic historical facts is essential to an understanding of both 
the strengths and the problems of the library today, of its place in society, and of 
what it is best competent and equipped to do. 

EVENTS OF THE YEAR 

Certainly the last twelve months was a period of great activity, of further clarifi- 
cation of programs and objectives — a period in which the Library was strengthened 
in all its aspects. Memorial Hall Library's single most important accomplishment was 
the advent of a daily delivery service that brings to the community virtually all the 
resources of the largest public and private institutions in the Commonwealth. One of 
the most significant responsibilities of the Library is to offer information to the 
widest possible audience. In this dimension there has not been total success. The 
most prominent reasons for not attaining complete success are in the increased cost 
of materials, need for additional space, and inability to reach all of the members of 
the community. Attempts are constantly made to make use of new ideas and techniques, 
experimenting, weeding out, searching for ways to enrich the Library and its meaning 
for people. For example, a business collection to be shelved separately which will 
serve the needs of the business community is now being planned. 

Another outstanding accomplishment for the year has been the success achieved in ser- 
ving the shut-ins and aged. More comprehensive services have been brought about with 
special programs, more varied reading materials, and reader service. The Library is 
now negotiating with the Council on Aging to offer referral services to the aged that 
will result in more comprehensive health and welfare programs to be provided by State 

25 



institutions. The Library will be the vehicle that will be used to connect the 
services with the recipient. 

The referral service that was instituted to bring volunteers and philanthropic groups 
together has been a huge success. Some of the most powerful programs offered have 
been the May Festival, complimented by the International Tea, and a discussion series 
in the Arts and Humanities. Concert series and lecture series were culminated with 
seminars directed by educators from nearby community colleges. These programs are 
indicative of the Library's efforts in the area of education on all levels as it con- 
tinues to become a more aggressive educational center and a forum for the community. 

The scholarship of the staff of Memorial Hall Library is a deciding factor in this 
effort. The Library continues to attract first-rate minds who know how to make the 
collection intelligible and rewarding to the readers. Bibliographic assistance and 
reader advisory service are regular functions of the professional staff. 

In a real sense librarians share with universities and colleges a responsibility for 
preserving and passing from generation to generation knowledge and experience pains- 
takingly acquired over the centuries. They preserve the glories of the past which 
are necessary if people are to keep a sense of perspective about themselves in the 
present, especially a present of quick and perplexing change. Memorial Hall Library 
is thus an essentially educational institution. For whatever other reasons the Li- 
brary collects, preserves, and displays materials, it does so out of a conviction 
that these materials will teach something worth knowing and that this knowledge is 
indispensable to the perception of an enlightened society, one that will face and 
solve its problems. It is to serve these purposes that a great deal of money must be 
spent today on a highly trained staff and upon adequate materials and a facility for 
programs. For the first time the budget contains a section entitled "Programs." It 
reflects the predominent degree to which the Library's resources of time, funds, and 
energy are now devoted to a broad local community of interests. A public library 
must realize when preparing its budget from year to year that it must support and im- 
plement the expansion of its program of public service. Administration realizes full 
well that there is a limit to how far it may proceed in taxing the community for li- 
brary service. However, the needs are many, and the community continues to grow. If 
Memorial Hall Library is to continue to possess its long and proud tradition for pub- 
lic service, the townspeople must support it as a "first priority." 

CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS 

Clearly some fundamental reassessment of cultural institutions as economic and social 
entities is in order and overdue. 

Fundamental changes in the nature of the American economy and society have resulted 
in increased demands made upon libraries without encouraging new means of support. 
Fortunately, enlightened concern is growing among leaders of government. Revenue 
Sharing recently enacted by the Federal Government places support of public libraries 
in "priority." State Grant-in-Aid has increased recently from 25£ per capita to 37^ 
per capita. 

The Eastern Massachusetts Regional Library System is growing with expanded services 
in the offing. Mutual cooperation of libraries in contiguous communities is being 
encouraged by the Commissioners of the Bureau of Library Extension. Such cooperation 
will improve library service and will help to defray costs of library service. In 
the meantime, the growth in this institution's value to society and its continued re- 
sponse to contemporary needs goes forward unabated. 

The continuance of technological advances and medical successes which result in ex- 
tended longevity and more leisure time for self -improvement all promote the need and 
insure the presence of libraries in the future. 

The fervent wish of Memorial Hall Library is to serve the whole community. This ob- 
jective cannot be accomplished alone, but with everyone working together, success will 
come . 



26 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 
Adult 



Juvenile 



REGISTRATION OF BORROWERS 
BOOK STOCK AND USE 



1972 



3,213 



1971 



3,191 



1972 



1971 



1972 



Total 
1971 



Vols, at end of reporting year 84,176 75,000 

Vols, added 9,176 10,450 

Vols, withdrawn 4,667 1,587 
Vols circulated 
(Incl. periodicals & 

pamphlets) 203,922 193,323 

PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS 



1,204 4,000 4,417 7,191 



24,813 24,000 108,989 99,000 
813 1,600 9,989 12,050 
263 450 4,930 2,037 



88,159 86,550 292,081 279,873 



Subscriptions 
Gifts 

AUDIO-VISUAL 

Framed Reproductions 

and Sculpture Pieces 
Records 

Slides, filmstrips 
Microfilm (reels) 
Films (reels) 

GRAND TOTAL CIRCULATION: 

INTERLIBRARY LOAN 

Books borrowed from other libraries 
Books loaned to other libraries 

ACTIVITY GROUPS 

Adult Programs 
Story Hours 
Preschool Programs 
School Class Visits 
Other Juvenile Programs (Art, Music, 
Poetry, Crafts, etc.) 75 

PERSONNEL 

Total Budget $266,767 

Personnel Services 185,187 

Personnel as percent of Total Budget 67% 
Full-time Personnel 20 

Part-time Personnel ( = 12 full-time) 42: 

Total Personnel 62 

PER CAPITA (based on 1970 census, 23,695 population) 



450 


415 


30 


29 


480 




444 


50 


54 


— 


— 


50 




54 


Owned 


at end of 




Added 




Circulated 


report 


ing year 


during year 


dur 


ing year 


277 


228 




49 






815 


4,597 


3,600 




584 






15,153 


310 


310 











190 


2,967 


2,887 




80 






— 


164 


118 




46 






2,026 


310,955 


(1) 
1971 




1972 








aries 

)S 


216 
2,633 

25 

15 
86 
16 




421 
5,348 

52 
15 
76 
18 









BOOK STOCK 
CIRCULATION OF BOOKS 



4.1 
12.33 



125 



$318,304 
226,966 

71% 

22 

40 

62 



2.1 
13.7 



(1) Statistics for the library's Ballardvale Branch are included in the general 

figures. The branch is open 10 hours per week, has a total book stock of 5,716 
In 1972 the total curculation of 9,668 included 4,863 Adult and 4,805 Juvenile. 



27 



Board of Health 



General: Total services rendered by the Board of Health during the year 1972 showed 
a significant increase over those rendered during the years 1970 and 1971. 

PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES AND HEALTH EDUCATION (See Table I) 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICES 

Public Health nursing services includes communicable disease control, child health 
dealing with infants and pre-schoolers, handicapped as well as school health, con- 
sultation services for day care centers, and nursing homes as well as referrals to 
other agencies. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL 

Tuberculosis: Tuberculosis continues to decline through vigilant follow-up and 
screening by Mantoux Skin Testing and Tine Skin Testing. The current Tuberculo- 
static drugs have revolutionized the care and treatment of Tuberculosis. There was 
one active case reported in Andover in 1972. Tuberculostatic drugs were supplied to 
the patient with follow-up by the Public Health Nurse and the Lawrence Tuberculosis 
Clinic. There were eleven patients on Tuberculostatic drugs and Chemophrophy lactic 
Isoniazid in 1972, and the nurse was responsible for helping patients obtain medica- 
tion and for checking them while they were on the medication. Numerous inactive pa- 
tients and positive skin reactors were checked by the nurse. She also did Mantoux 
skin testing for the Nursing Home personnel and Andover residents who need this as a 
prerequisite for employment. 

Other Communicable Diseases: Forty-six cases of mumps were individually followed 
up as were six cases of salmonella and one case of shigella. The necessary epidemi- 
ological information on each case was forwarded to the State Department of Public 
Health. 

CHILD HEALTH 

Premature babies, whose parents reside in Andover, are visited to determine future 
health care of infant and also any needs the family might have pertaining to the 
health and welfare of the infant. 

St. Augustine's School Health Program was carried out by volunteer nurses and a vol- 
unteer dental hygienist under the supervision and direction of the Public Health 
Nurse. The program met all the State requirements for School Health. 

CONSULTATION 

State Public Health Standards are met in Nursing Homes by State Inspection along 
with another inspection by the local Health Department Nurse and Sanitarian. 

Nursery Schools are licensed by the Andover Board of Health. Seven nursery schools 
operated in Andover in 1972, and one group went through the licensing procedure; but 
because of legal difficulties did not follow through with the license. Visits to all 
nursery schools are made each year by the Public Health Nurse to ensure State Stan- 
dards are being met and to offer any assistance needed. 

OTHER SERVICES 

Certification of immunizations were down in 1972, probably due to a worldwide reduc- 
tion in communicable diseases such as smallpox. 

The number of biologicals dispensed in 1972 was slightly higher than in 1971. 

Diagnostic kits dispensed in 1972 were about 31% less than in 1971. 

28 



Communicable disease reports were considerably up over 1971 due to a significant 
increase in cases of mumps (up from 2 in 1971 to 46 in 1972) and chickenpox (up from 
19 in 1971 to 143 in 1972.) 

Animal bites remained at about a constant (91 bites in 1972.) 

CLINICS SPONSORED 

A vision screening program for the detection of Amblyopia was conducted by trained 
volunteers from the Andona Society. Children under five years of age were screened. 
No Amblyopia was detected; but after testing 304 children, ten were found to have 
vision problems. Nine of these children were given corrective lenses, but the tenth 
moved out of town and follow-up was impossible. 

A Rabies Clinic was conducted by Dr. Richard Lindsay, and 692 dogs were immunized. 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES (See Table II ) 

Total services were up 45% over 1971. 

PLUMBING AND GAS SERVICES 

Because there was a higher level of new construction and the Plumbing Inspector is 
now working full time instead of part time, the plumbing and gas services showed a 
54% increase over 1971. Now that the Inspector works full time, he is able to give 
a much more thorough inspection to individual jobs. 

SUB-SURFACE SEWAGE DISPOSAL SERVICES 

These services increased 70% over those for 1971 and would have been higher except 
for the increased demand for manpower in sub-surface sewage disposal work. 

The rejection rate of lots has been progressively increasing since 1967. The aver- 
age rejection rate for 1967 through 1971 was 10.5%, whereas the 1972 rejection rate 
was 21.0%. 

The number of sub-surface sewage disposal systems constructed in 1972 was 38% 
greater than that for 1971 and 64% greater than that for 1970. 

FOOD ESTABLISHMENT SERVICES 

This function increased 10% over 1971 and would have increased even more but for the 
increased demand for manpower in sub-surface sewage disposal work. 

The food establishments had an average score of 85% out of a possible 100%. This is 
a very good rating, but there are a number of weaknesses that only constant surveil- 
lance will alleviate. 

SWIMMING POOL SERVICES 

In 1972 these services were 27% above those rendered in 1971; however, due to the 
manpower shortage, none of the private pools have been followed up to ensure that 
their installations were made in accordance with plans approved by the Board of 
Health. 

REQUEST FOR SERVICE (complaints ) 

These services increased 23% over those in 1971 and should continue to increase as 
the Town's population increases. 

OTHER SERVICES 

These services were up 15% over 1971 and would have been higher but for the manpower 

demand of sub-surface sewage disposal systems. This category includes stables, pig- 
geries, camps, massage parlors, dairy plants, offal carriers, funeral directors, and 

burial permits. 

29 



TABLE I 



PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES AND HEALTH EDUCATION 



1970 



1971 



1972 



Public Health Nursing Services 
Other Services : 



763 



839 



758 



1. Certification of Immunizations 

2. Biological and Diagnostic Kits 

3 . Communicable Disease Reports 

4. Animal Bite Reports 

5. Clinics Sponsored 
Licensing (Day Care) 

Grand Totals 



730 


726 


53 5 


238 


191 


162 


296 


45 


219 


89 


95 


91 


- 


2 


2 


10 


6 


2 



2,126 1,904 1,769 



TABLE II 



ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1972 

% Increase 

Over 1971 



Plumbing and Gas Inspection 
Services 
Licensing 

Totals 

Sub-Surface Sewage Disposal 
Services 
Licensing 

Totals 



736 
395 



256 
178 

434 



701 1,093 
353 531 



1,131 1,054 1,624 



299 
240 

539 



553 
365 

918 



54% 



70% 



Food Establishments 
Services 
Licensing 

Totals 



129 
168 

297 



122 
179 

301 



145 
187 

331 



10% 



Swimming Pools 
Services 
Licensing 

Totals 

Requests for Service (Complaints) 
Services 

Other Services 
Services 
Licensing 

Totals 

Grand Total Services 
Grand Total Licensing 

Grand Total Services & Licensing 



8 
53 




13 

59 




9 
70 




61 




72 




79 


27% 


87 




147 




181 


23% 


51 

142 




51 
172 




86 

171 




193 




223 




257 


15% 


1,267 
936 


1 
1 


,333 
,003 


2 
1 


,067 
,324 


55% 
33% 



2,203 2,336 3,391 



45% 



30 



TABLE III 

1972 

% Increase 
1970 1971 1972 Over 1971 

Total Annual Income from Licensing $4,360 $4,741 $6,744 42% 

Veterans' Services 

More than 2,100 individuals were interviewed in 1972, and a wide range of 
services were provided to many of them. In addition to financial assistance to many 
local residents, the Department was called on to solve many complex family problems 
concerning housing, unemployment, hospitalization, education, etc., without any ex- 
penditures of local or State funds. Although unemployment was a major problem in 
1972, an upswing in the National economy resulted in fewer applications for finan- 
cial aid because of lack of work. 

Expenses for medical care for the elderly continue to comprise a substantial 
portion of the budget, mainly due to the spiraling costs of hospital, nursing home, 
and medical care. Efforts are being made on the Federal level to enact a National 
Health Insurance Program, but it does not appear that this type of legislation will 
be enacted by Congress in 1973. 

As a result of claims filed through this office in 1972, monthly pension and 
compensation awards in the amount of $3,627 were received by local residents from 
the Veterans' Administration. When projected for a 12-month period, this aggregate 
amount will total in excess of $43,500, resulting in a substantial reduction in the 
expenditures of this Department . 

Thirty Andover veterans died in 1972, eleven World War One, fifteen World War 
Two, three Korean Campaign, and one individual who served in the Spanish American 
War. In each instance, the survivors and dependents were contacted by this office, 
and assistance was given in filing for Veterans' Administration benefits. 



Council on Aging 



The highlight of the year for the Council on Aging was the moving of The Andover 
Haven to its present larger quarters. The current facilities at 25 Barnard Street 
are more than adequate and provide a pleasant, spacious atmosphere for the "over- 
sixty" activities. 1973 has seen an increase in the number of senior citizens 
making use of the facilities provided, which is gratifying to the members of the 
Council. 

The Drop-In Center has continued to expand its referral service with an up-to- 
date file on the services and opportunities available to the older residents of An- 
dover » It is hoped that the expansion can continue in this area, as there is a need 
to provide greater service in the fields of useful employment and activity for the 
retired person. 

Classes in sewing, crewel embroidery, oil painting, decoupage, and various 
other handcrafts have been held successfully over the past year. During May, Senior 
Citizens' Month, an open house was held for the general public and an invitation is- 
sued to view some of the handwork done by members of the group. About two hundred 
people stopped in to see the displays and express their appreciation of the work 
done . 

On the first Tuesday of each month during the regular school year the Andover 
Haven Associates participate in a hot lunch program at the Greater Lawrence Regional 
Vocational Technical High School. The Public School System of the Town of Andover 

31 



has made a hot lunch program available on an everyday basis. The program has been 
generously implemented by the Cafeteria Supervisor but has not met with much of a 
response. A small group attended a supper provided by the cafeteria at East Junior 
High last spring and enjoyed the meal which was served. To cap off a pleasant 
evening, they were also invited to the performance of "Dear Ruth" put on by the 
students of the school. 

Another highlight of the program this year was the Annual Christmas Party put 
on by the local groups of Knights of Columbus, Masons, and the Andover Service Club. 
Well over two hundred and fifty persons attended the turkey dinner and entertainment. 
The generosity of these local groups who gave so freely of their time is much appre- 
ciated . 

Memorial Hall Library provides an afternoon of films once a month on the third 
Thursday. These are quite well attended, and the program is usually followed by a 
brief business meeting and light refreshments. The volunteer group, Friends of 
Memorial Hall Library, continues to bring films to The Haven on a regular basis, and 
this program is also fairly well attended. 

Memorial Hall Library also sponsored an exhibit of handwork done by the senior 
citizens of Andover during National Library Week. The Library has also sponsored 
two evenings of music by the Stringed Group of the Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Or- 
chestra for the golden-agers . Appreciation is extended to all who make these pro- 
grams possible. 

The group of happy bowlers is continuing in its fourth season. After bowling 
three or four strings, many of them have lunch at one of the local restaurants and 
then follow up with a game or two of Scrabble at The Haven. This group enjoys each 
other's company so much that they have several banquets during the year. The latest 
was a Christmas Party at one of the local eating places. The average age of the group 
is in the mid-seventies. 

Some of the trips during the past year have been to the Burlington Mall; White 
River Junction, Vermont; WB'Z-TV with lunch at Pier Four; Ogunquit , Maine; Rockport ; 
and Concord, New Hampshire. Generally, there is at least one trip provided each 
month, and occasionally there are two. These trips are so popular that generally all 
those who wish to attend cannot be accommodated, and an occasional late-arriver has 
been disappointed. 

Anyone who watches the Sonya Hamlin television show on WBZ might have seen some 
familiar faces two noon times during the first week on November. Fifty of The 
Haven's group were in the audience for the show, and the camera picked up a few who 
were near the front . 

The Andover Haven Newsletter is available usually around the first of each 
month and lists the current activities, birthdays, and other items of interest. 

Mrs. Natalie Stokam continues her energetic, devoted service as Director of The 
Andover Haven. 



Planning Board 



During 1972, the Planning Board lost its chairman and member of long standing, 
Harold T. King, due to his retirement. Mr. King's strong leadership and tireless 
involvement in every aspect of Planning Board activities for the past fifteen years 
was of invaluable service to the Board and to the Town; he will indeed be missed. 
New members appointed to fill vacancies are George Mayo, Jr., and Stanley Saba; 
Margaret R. Keck became chairman. 

The Federal Emergency Employment Act continued to provide a major share of the 
funds for the employment of Town Planner Joseph Schall and Planning Assistant Betsy 
Poynter . 

32 



Nine subdivisions totalling 122 house lots were presented to the Planning Board. 
Of these, the Board approved six plans having a total of 87 lots; there are three 
plans pending. In addition, a total of forty-four Form A requests were certified by 
the Board as not being subject to subdivision procedures. 

As in the past, representatives of the Board attended the twelve Board of Ap- 
peals hearings, voicing the viewpoint of the Planning Board with respect to each of 
the forty-one petitions heard by the Board of Appeals. The Planning Board was also 
regularly represented in the activities of the Central Merrimack Valley Regional 
Planning Commission and the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards and attended 
hearings in the State House on the proposed changes in Chapter 40A, the Zoning En- 
abling Act. In addition, special meetings were held with the Board of Selectmen on 
the Lowell Junction Connector Study, the West Andover - Lawrence Connector, the 
TOPICS Program, flood plain zoning, and low income housing, among other subjects. 

In addition to the Lowell Junction Connector Study, three major studies have 
been carried out by consultants this year. These are a Central Business District 
Parking Study, a development plan for the Central Business District, and a Capital 
Expenditure Program. It should be mentioned that all of the data gathering for the 
Parking Study was done by volunteers under the supervision of Town Planner Joseph 
Schall, Jr. These three studies are nearing completion, and it is expected that 
final reports will be available before the March Town Meeting. 

In addition, at the request of the Selectmen, the Planning Board made a study 
of Andover 's needs for low income housing; this will become part of a continuing an- 
alysis of housing needs which the Board has been carrying on for several years. 
After reviewing the Board's findings, the Board of Selectmen voted to establish a 
goal of construction of fifty low-moderate income housing units. Mr. Schall and 
Miss Poynter are also engaged in preparation of a continuous land use chart, the 
purpose of which is to provide current information on development and land use in 
Andover which can be updated annually. 

With respect to zoning matters, the Board held public hearings on five private 
zoning articles and one Planning Board article for the March, 1972, Annual Town 
Meeting. Four of the private articles were withdrawn. Of the two remaining, both 
were supported by the Planning Board. Article 45, which established an Office Park 
District for the purpose of constructing a medical facility, was passed by Town 
Meeting. Article 13, which asked for establishment of an animal hospital use, was 
defeated. However, the Planning Board feels that Town Meeting indicated a desire 
for the Board to study animal hospital zoning and present its own proposal; accord- 
ingly, an article proposed by the Board has been inserted in the Warrant for the 
March, 1973, Annual Town Meeting. For the October Town Meeting, 1972, the Planning 
Board submitted an article to permit flood plain zoning delineating certain areas 
bordering the Shawsheen and Merrimack Rivers as subject to flood plain restrictions. 
The areas delineated are those designated in the Corps of Engineers' Report of March, 
1972, as having a one percent change of being flooded in any given year. After the 
public hearing, the Board decided to withdraw the article because it was felt that 
not enough information had been made available to other Town boards, citizens, and 
affected property owners. It is the Board's intent to hold a series of informa- 
tional meetings during the spring and summer of 1973 with the goal of submitting it 
again to the October, 1973, Town Meeting. 

The foregoing provides some indication of the scope of Planning Board activ- 
ities. In addition, all sections of the 1965 Comprehensive Plan need updating, 
which is an enormous task; apartment zoning should be reviewed; and revisions to 
subdivision rules and regulations are needed. 

Finally, the demand for information and services on the part of citizens and 
other Town boards seems to be increasing. For these reasons, the Planning Board 
unanimously agreed to include in its eighteen-month budget request funds for a full- 
time planner. The Board has been fortunate in having the services of the planner 
during the past year, through funds provided by the Federal Emergency Employment 
Act; and as a result of that experience the Board believes that the interests and 
needs of the Town will be best served through a continuation of that position. It 
is hoped that Town Meeting will support the request. 

33 



Board of Appeals 



The Andover Board of Appeals, in its 37th year, is authorized to function under 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A and the Town By- 
laws. The Board meets regularly on the first Thursday of every month in the second 
floor hall of the Memorial Hall Library. Three regular members and three alternate 
members are appointed by the Selectmen and serve without pay. 

The office of the Board of Appeals receives applications from petitioners de- 
siring to: (1) obtain a variance from the Bylaw; (2) obtain a special permit; and 
(3) appear as a party aggrieved by the decision of the Building Inspector or other 
Town authority. Previous to the hearing, applications are prepared with pertinent 
plans and sketches, legal advertisements are prepared and published, and abutters 
are notified as required by law. The public hearings are conducted by the Chairman 
in conformity with Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations which were revised and up- I 
dated in 1972. Following the hearing, the members of the Board personally view each I 
piece of property in question. Based on their view and the evidence presented at 
the hearing, a decision is rendered, signed, and filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk. Parties in interest are then notified as to the Board's decision. 

In 1972 the Board was scheduled as follows : 

3 cases were pending from 1971 
41 petitions were heard 

Disposition 

13 petitions were denied 
28 petitions were granted 

1 petition was withdrawn 

2 petitions are pending 

44 

1 revocation of permit was also issued. 

Twenty-five percent of the requests involved additions, including apartments, 
in both residential and commercial situations. Among others, the remaining peti- 
tions included, diversely, 3 service stations, 1 medical building, 4 dimensional re- 
quirements, a radio tower, a cemetery, and a pony racing track. 

The members of the Board of Appeals spend approximately 300 hours per year in 
all phases of Board activity. 

$945 in advertising fees was collected and turned over to the Town Treasurer. 



Electrical Inspection 



During the year 1972, 872 inspections were made with 617 Electrical Permits 
issued and categorized as follows : 

New Structures 204 

Other (oil burners, temporary services 

remodeling) 409 

Gratis 4 

Total fees turned over to the Town Treasurer and the Town Collector amounted to 
$3,288.00. 

34 



Parks 



The Park Division during the early Spring made repairs and painted all the 
backstops on all the baseball diamonds both on regular and Little League Fields. 
Eight Little League and three regular size fields were raked, rolled and marked 
for each game for the schools and Little League teams. 

This division also prepares the tracks for all its meets, and marks all 
Soccer fields for boy and girl teams. 

Portable bleachers are erected at the Little League Field central area, also 
portable bleachers are erected at the High School baseball field and at the cen- 
tral area for Junior League baseball and (PeeWee) football fields. 

Fertilizer was applied in Spring and Fall on both the Park and Playstead 
areas and all playfields were seeded. 

All school grass areas were fertilized in the Spring 1972. Maintenance of 
some 26 grass plot areas within the town as well as the grass areas at the High 
School and West Junior High. 

The Park Division removes rubbish at least three times each week from all 
the containers in the street around the town, the Town Hall, Safety Center, 
Recreation Park, Shawsheen Square, Town Yard, Burnham Road, and the playgrounds 
through the summer . 

The Park men return to the Highway Division for the winter season. 



Forestry 



A diversified tree planting program was continued during the past year with 
120 young trees being set out and maintained. Several species of shade and orna- 
mental trees were planted including several varieties of maples, lindens, syca- 
mores, disease resistant elms, pines, flowering crabapples , cherries and plums. 
All newly planted trees were fertilized, mulched and watered during the growing 
season. 

The shade tree spray program designed to protect trees from insects and dis- 
eases was carried out using State and Federal approved pesticides and application 
methods. Spraying was done to control infestations of elm bark beetles, elm leaf 
beetles, willow leaf beetles, aphids, oak skeletonizers and webworms . The damage 
by oak skeletonizers which had caused severe defoliation for the past four years 
was less in 1972 due to natural controls and use of new pesticides. 

Dutch Elm disease was found to have infected 45 trees this year. These in- 
fected trees were cut down and disposed of at the Landfill Site. 

Joint efforts of the Massachusetts Electric Company, the New England Tele- 
graph and Telephone Company and the Andover Forestry Division effected the removal 
of approximately 12 dangerous trees over utility wires. Massachusetts Department 
of Natural Resources personnel assisted in locating sampling and removing a number 
of diseased trees . 

Routine tree maintenance work included low limb removal, dangerous tree re- 
moval, bark tracing damaged trunk areas, cabling weak trees, watering and fertili- 
zing young trees. 

Supervision and inspection of wire clearing work was continued and new under- 
ground and aerial construction gone over in detail with the utility engineers and 
arbor is ts. 

Yearly control of poison ivy and roadside brush by herbicide spraying was 
done along roads and recreation areas. Roadside mowing of grass and weeds was 
performed by contract work durin the summer. This project includes all town 
roads and public areas which require high grass cutting by a tractor mounted 
mower . 

During 1972 a total of 53 trees were topped by contract work. 



35 



The following trees died and were removed during the year: 

40 Maples 
8 Ashes 

2 Pines 

3 Oaks 
Several factors which have damaging effect on plant and tree growth include 

insects and diseases, lack of moisture, pavement close to tree trunks, root cutting 
gas leaks, and atmosphere pollution. 

Forestry Division personnel worked during snow storms operating trucks and 
sidewalk plows. 

During 1972 Mr. Philip Busby, the Forestry Superintendent, left the Town 
service. Mr. Busby fulfilled his position for 18 years with the Town and we would 
like to take this opportunity to thank him for his services and wish him well in 
his future career. 



Engineering 



Field surveys were completed, construction plans and specifications were pre- 
pared, bids taken, field layout and on-site inspections were provided for the 
following list of projects. 

1. Surface water drainage lines totaling 10,157 lineal feet, under five different 
contracts, were installed throughout the town. The total of the low bid prices 
for these five contracts amounted to $113,083. 

2. 3105 fineal feet of 8 inch and 12 inch water mains were installed in Red Spring 
Road (890 lin.ft.), Abbot Street (1660 lin.ft.) and Lowell Junction Connector 
Road (555 lin.ft.). 

3. 526 lineal feet of 12 inch sanitary sewer was installed in Lowell Junction 
Connector Road to serve the new warehouse being built there. 

4. The completion of approximately 400 lineal feet of roadway and utilities was 
started in Smithshire Estates Extension under a bond defaulted by the 
developer . 

5. Several small jobs such as chain link fences, Little League Fields and skinned 
areas, highway guard rails were completed in 1972. 

PLANNING BOARD : 

Preliminary and definitive plans for 9 subdivisions of land with a total of 
122 lots were reviewed for the Planning Board to determine conformance with its 
rules and regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. 
New roadway and utility construction was inspected in the subdivisions under con- 
struction. This activity was concentrated mainly in two of the large subdivisions, 
Legal descriptions for easements and roadway layouts were also checked before they 
were filed. 
MISCELLANEOUS : 

1. Easement and betterment plans were prepared where applicable for the 
projects outlined above. 

2. Many plans, drawings and sketches were prepared for the Selectmen, Town 
Manager and the various Town Departments and Boards. 

3. Many Town citizens were assisted in obtaining information about existing 
Town utilities, street layouts and other general information. 

4. This division assisted in providing street opening permits for under- 
ground utilities. 

5. The Town was represented in all engineering matters with the County and 
State governments, principally concerning Chapter 90 reconstruction and 
County layouts. 

6. The engineering records of the Town were maintained and other Town de- 
partments were aided in obtaining such information. 

The Engineering Division consists of two full-time employees with two 
students employed during the summer months. 



36 






Spring Grove Cemetery 



Spring Grove Cemetery is located in the southwesterly part of the town with 
the principal entrance at the junction of Abbot Street and Spring Grove Road. 

The Cemetery contains about 60 acres of land, of which 14 acres are un- 
developed. It has been planned and developed to keep its natural beauty. Lots 
are available to meet all requirements. 

Routine work consists of cutting grass, trimming around monuments, raking 
and cleaning up the grounds, cutting of brush, pruning of trees and shrubs, pre- 
paring of new gravesites, filling in sunken graves, grading and seeding of winter 
graves, applying lime and fertilizers, keeping roads cleared of snow, pouring of 
cement for foundations and interments. 

The Cemetery is open 7 days a week and year round. 

Cemetery personnel work during all snow storms operating trucks and plows 
for the Highway Division. 

The Cemetery Division of the Department of Public Works consists of three 
employees and a Superintendent. 

During the year 33 new lots were sold and we had 97 interments. From the 
perpetual care payments on these lots and from payments by 5 lot owners placing 
their older lots under perpetual care, a total of $5,400.00 was added to the 
perpetual care fund. This fund now totals $196,000.00 

A total of $8,480.00 was received from the sale of new lots, interments, 
foundation fees, lots under annual care and for the sale of flower rings. These 
general receipts and the income from Perpetual Care Fund was turned over to the 
Town Treasurer. 

MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS IN THE CEMETERY 

1. A new flag pole at the entrance to the Cemetery which was donated by 
Frederick E. Cheever. 

2. Two new plate grave sections opened. 

PURCHASES FOR THE CEMETERY 
1. 1972 Dump Truck - 2§ Ton 



Sewers 



The Sewer Division of the Department of Public Works consists of three 
employees. Two of these men handle all sewer blockages and complaints. One man 
is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Wastewater Treatment 
Facility off Dale Street in Ballardvale and the Wastewater Pumping Station at 
River ina Road. 

In 1972, the Division rodded and freed blockages in 78 main sewers. During 
the year 66 sewer blocks were handled in house service lines, for which the home- 
owner paid a service charge. A number of telephone calls for assistant was 
answered thought to be sewage backing up into homes but proving to be surface 
and ground water conditions. These calls numbered some 87. 

Maintenance of sewer mains is the prime function of this division. It is in- 
tended that all lines be rodded at least once a year, particularly those on a 
relatively flat slope that get sluggish due to low velocity flows. 

Manhole frames and covers were raised to grade before resurfacing work was 
performed by the Highway Division. 

A manhole on the outfall sewer from Andover thru the City of Lawrence had to 
be rebuilt when it was reported collapsed. This was caused in part by age and 
helped along by vandalism. There are other manholes on this outfall to the 
Merrimack River which will require some attention during the construction season 
of 1973. 

The Harding Street sewer inverted siphon installed in 1898 under the Boston & 
Maine Railroad tracks was hydraulically cleaned this year by contract. The 
carrying capacity of this main was reduced because of the age of the sewer and re- 
quired constant flushing and rodding by the Division. A specialist in the field 

37 



of hydraulic cleaning was hired to remedy this situation. This was accomplished 
by pumping water thru a rotating cleaning head at very high pressure. 

The Sewer Division received $241.25 for Special Services performed 
during the year. 



Water Department 



The Water Division of the Department of Public Works consists of fourteen 
full time employees including the Superintendent. The Division is responsible 
for the supply, treatment, and distribution of drinking water to the community, 
This water is conveyed thru some 155 miles of main from its source at Haggetts 
Pond. 

The total water pumped to the system for 1972 was 1,074,108,000 gallons. 
The average daily pumping was 2.94 million gallons and a maximum day of 4.51 
million gallons occurring on July 31, 1972. 
Water Services : 
Taps for water mains made - 2 
Taps for house services 51 
Additions to the Water System by Contract and Acceptance of Streets : 



1,660 feet 

890 
3,070 
1,900 

900 
2,403 
1,590 

780 
1,740 
L.C.I, pipe added to the system in 1972. 



(Hemlock to Holly) 



(Spring and Fall) 



Abbot Street 

Red Spring Road 

Kathleen Drive 

Marie Drive 

Sweetbriar Lane 

Hemlock Drive 

Wild Rose Drive 

Poplar Terrace 

Timothy Drive 

This is a total of 14,933 feet of 8" C. 

Leaks : 

House" Service Leaks Repaired - 58 

Water Main Breaks Repaired - 38 

Hydrants : 

Hydrants repaired or replaced -139 

New Hydrants added - 27 

Water Meters : 

New Meters Installed - 95 

Old Meters Replaced - 71 

Field Meters Serviced - 20 

Miscellaneous : 

Telephone calls recorded for turning on and turning off of water, curb and 
gate box repairs, location of services, meter leaks, etc. were 976. 

As of December 31, 1972, the water treatment facility under construction was 
79% complete. It is anticipated this plant will be on the line during mid 1973. 

The Division completely flushed the low service and east high service areas, 
thus completing the entire distribution system for the first time in many years. 

The West High Service was done in 1 71. While causing discolored water in 
areas being flushed for a period of time, the overall effect produced far fewer 
dirty water complaints than normal. 

We would now plan to make this flushing a yearly maintenance program which 
will improve the water quality. 

We received a preliminary copy of the report on the Water Distribution System 
voted at the 1972 Town Meeting. The report is being reviewed and the final copy 
for distribution is expected in February 1973. 

This study projects our needs for the next several years and it is hoped its 
immediate recommendations will be implemented by Town Meeting. This report deals 
with fire flow protection, distribution carrying capacity of mains and storage. 

Two water mains were installed by contract in Abbot Street and Red Spring 
Road during the year eliminating dead ends in the system and provided a fire flow 
in excess of 1,500 gallons per minute, compared to 350 gallons per minute before 
these new mains were installed. 



38 



Samples of water are collected at various locations throughout the system 
regularly and tested by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 

For special services that the Water Division performed the town received 
$990.00. 

Mr. Philip E. Rollins and Mr. David M. Thomson retired during 1972. They 
were employed by the Town, 26 years and 22 years respectively. 

Mr. Rollins served in the capacity of Chief Pumping Station Operator and 
Mr. Thomson as a Working Foreman. "Phil and Dike", we wish you both the best of 
everything in the future. 



Highways 



RESURFACING : 

During the year 1972, some 30 miles of roads were treated with MC3 asphalt 
and sand as well as being honed. The following streets were resurfaced by the 
above method: Abbot Street, Alden Road, Argilla Road, Ballardvale Road, Bailey 
Road, Bancroft Road, Beacon Street, Bellevue Road, Blanchard Street, Brundrett 
Avenue, Carmel Road, Cassimere Street, Chandler Circle, Chester Street, Chestnut 
Street, Dufton Road, Flint Circle, Foster Circle, Gardner Avenue, George Street, 
Gould Road, Haggetts Pond Road, Hall Avenue, High Street (Ballardvale), Kenilworth 
Street, Lincoln Street, Lincoln Circle, Linwood Street, Magnolia Avenue, Oak Street 
Orchard Street, Oriole Drive, Poor Street, Porter Road, Reservation Road (Cutler- 
Shawsheen) , Red Spring Road, Salem Street (Main-Holt), School Street, Sheridan 
Road, Shepley Street, Shirley Road, Strawberry Hill Road, Sunset Rock Road (Dead 
End), Tewksbury Street, Torr Street, West Parish Drive, Whittier Street (Bartlet- 
Chestnut) , Woodland Road, Woburn Street, Yale Road and York Street. 

The following streets were resurfaced with a layer of Type I Bituminous 
Concrete: Lowell Street from Haggetts Pond Road to Bellevue Road, a distance of 
approximately 4,000 feet and Central Street from the Shawsheen River to Torr 
Street and about 200 feet on River Street in Lowell Junction area. 
CLEAN UP : 

During the Spring and Summer two sweepers are kept busy cleaning the streets 
after the winter sanding. This past fall we had two leaf pickers removing leaves 
from the town streets. Sweepings from the streets were taken to the Landfill for 
use as cover material and the leaves were taken to the Essex Gravel Pit for com- 
posting. 
INSPECTION : 

The Highway Division works with the Engineering Division on its inspection 
of the conditions of streets before they are accepted as public ways by the Board 
of Selectmen. The Highway Division also provides men and equipment for all other 
divisions when needed. 
BRIDGES : 

Bridges under control of the Highway Division e.g. Stevens Street, Andover 
Street and Central Street were inspected during the year. Minor repairs were 
made to the Central Street Bridge and to the Stevens Street Bridge, this past 
year. 
S IDEWALKS : 

Sidewalks were constructed of type D-13 Bituminous Concrete; about 900 feet 
of sidewalk was built on the upper end of Morton Street, the entire length of the 
North side of Punchard Avenue, also the north side of Elm Street between Maple 
Avenue 'and Wolcott Avenue and about 300 feet of new sidewalk built on Washington 
Avenue from Elm Street down on' the west side; a cement sidewalk was constructed 
at the west side of Stirling Street between Dunbarton and Sutherland Streets. 
STORM DRAINS : 

A storm drain (180 lineal feet of 12" cement pipe) and two catch basins were 
built. The existing culvert at Chandler Road and North Street was replaced with 
120 lineal feet of 30-inch storm drain. 

Existing catch basins and storm drains were cleaned and repaired. 



39 



SNOW AND ICE CONTROL : 

The Highway Division was in charge of snow removal and sanding, 
for the years 1971-1972 was as follows: 

November 0.81 inches 

December 14.50 

January 6 . 50 

February 35.05 

March 20.00 

April 7.00 



The snowfall 



TOTAL 1972 



83.86 



Landfill 



The present 25 acre site has been used for the disposal of solid waste since 
shortly after World War II. The seriousness of the existing pollution problem 
was not fully comprehended until the latter part of 1970. At that time, all dis- 
posals of chemicals ceased. 

In 1972 a sub drain was installed at the present site in order to intercept 
the ground water flowing into the landfill site and by passing it around the site 
in order to eliminate further pollution problems. The determinations of the 
ground elevations indicate that the sub drain is working effectively. It is 
planned that during 1973 that the sub drain will be extended in order to further 
control the ground water flowing into the existing landfill site. 

During 1972 a major improvement was made, converting the present site from 
open dump into a Sanitary Landfill meeting all present State regulations. Ade- 
quate funds were approved in the 1972 budget to provide daily cover material on 
all waste deposited at the site. 

A new compactor was purchased in 1972 to provide more adequate compaction 
of the solid waste material, thereby requiring less space at the landfill, and 
in turn requiring less daily cover material. We have experienced many operational 
problems with the new machine. However, it has proven more than adequate when 
operatable. The machine is under a year's guarantee and we hope to have all the 
defects out by the end of the guarantee period. 

A detailed report was completed by consulting engineers on the recommenda- 
tions of two new future sites for sanitary landfill operation in Andover . Detail 
costs analysis was made on both sites and it was found that the Cyr-Cronin-Brooks 
site would provide the most expensive site to develop but when we added in the 
purchase price of the land it became the most economical of the two sites under 
study. 

Town Meeting was asked twice in 1972 for money to purchase a new site and in 
both cases there was over 60% of the voters in favor of purchasing the Cyr-Cronin 
site. However, we lack the necessary two thirds vote required for bond issue. 

During the latter part of 1972 the State Health Department ordered us out 
of our present site. A hearing on this order rescinding the use of our site will 
be held early in 1973. 

We hope to resolve our present problems with disposal of our solid waste 
during 1973. 



40 



G. L. R. R. D. P. B. 



The Greater Lawrence Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board met many times 
throughout 1972. During the greater portion of this year, the effort was made to 
obtain approval of a detailed regional solid waste study for this area by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works (Division of Solid Waste) . This study 
was finally funded and work began in November 1972. 

This study by the consulting engineers retained by the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Works will investigate all possible sites within the region for 
solid waste disposal areas and all methods and costs of disposal will be deter- 
mined. This report should be available in March 1973. 

Upon completion of this study the Planning Board will then evaluate the 
consultant's study and make recommendations to their respective communities. 

The final decision on any regional solid waste plan must have approval of 
the local officials and in the case of Andover , any recommended method for solid 
waste disposal will have to obtain approval of the Town Meeting. 



G. L. S. D. C. 



The district has been meeting at least monthly during the year reviewing the 
progress of the detailed construction plans and specifications for the wastewater 
treatment abatement facilities for the Greater Lawrence area (Andover, North 
Andover, Methuen and Lawrence). 

All of the plans have been completed and we have received approvals from all 
State and Federal agencies for these plans and specifications. Presently, the 
district is ready for competitive bidding and start of construction of this plant 
and are now waiting only for the Federal and State grants. 

During 1972 the Federal Government revised their water pollution control 
bill. The present bill calls for 75% funding of all water pollution abatement 
projects by the Federal Government. This change in Federal law has required that 
the Massachusetts Legislature revise the existing Massachusetts Clean Water Act. 

It is expected that the Governor will request the necessary changes in this 
Act in his message early in 1973. It is hoped that the Legislature will take 
quick action in establishing a new Massachusetts Clean Water Bill in order that 
the proposed project for the Greater Lawrence Sanitary Tistrict will be funded 
early in 1973. 

A colored slide presentation is available that explains the history of the 
Sanitary District, the proposed wastewater abatement facilities, and the costs 
for any interested groups. 



41 



G.LR.V.T. High School 



Construction on the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School's 
new expansion facility began on June 8, 1971, and continued on a full scale basis 
during 1972. By the Christmas vacation of 1972, the bottom floor of the building was 
ready for occupancy with the remainder of the facility scheduled to open in late Jan- 
uary of 1973. 

In anticipation of the completion of the new building, the vocational areas of 
study were increased for the opening of the 1972-73 school year with an accompanying 
increase in student enrollment and faculty personnel. The student enrollment in- 
creased from 772 students in September of 1971-72 to 1,403 students for the school 
year 1972-73. 

Faculty membership increased from sixty-two teachers in September of 1971-72 to 
ninety-nine instructors as of December 31, 1972. 

During this period of time the curriculum offerings increased from ten basic vo- 
cational disciplines and four Technical Institute and Post Graduate courses to over 
thirty distinct programs of study. 

It should be noted that in 1972 specific courses for young ladies were intro- 
duced on the secondary level. Specifically, the curriculum for girls includes Home 
Management and Health Services. Both of these courses commence at the Freshman- 
Sophomore level. Two other courses of study are open to co-eds at the Junior level: 
Unit Record (Basic Date Processing, Key Punching, Typing) and Distributive Occupa- 
tions . 

Both Unit Record and Distributive Occupations are also open for male students at 
the Junior level with one additional Junior level course; namely, Air Conditioning 
and Refrigeration. 

The Summer School and Industrial Entry Programs took on new formats during 1972 
While maintaining former courses which allowed students to concentrate on a spec- 
ialized vocational course of study, a "cluster" of related vocational studies was 
scheduled for students desiring the opportunity to investigate future opportunities 
in two to three different trade and technical areas. 

The appeal of the cluster format appears evident in the increased enrollment in 
the Summer School and Industrial Entry Programs, both of which are covered in more 
detail later in this report. 

In general, the Career Development - Exploratory Program with its cluster format 
allowed younger students, especially eighth grade students, to gain a clearer under- 
standing of the nature and difficulty of a particular vocational discipline, and to 
measure their aptitude and affinity for possible further study and future employment. 

With the term "Career Development" and all of its implications becoming more and 
more prevalent in education, this type of vocational training allowed both the 
school administration and the professional staff to gain experience in measuring 
student achievement in short, intensified courses which placed emphasis on practical 
experience and the rapid acquisition of basic skills. 

The "Variable Potential" Training Program provides emphasis on controlled con- 
ditions of instruction and curriculum content for those who exhibit some mechanical 
aptitude as well as a desire to achieve. 

While it is yet much too early to judge the outcome of this program, preliminary 
observations indicate that the students are making progress in most of the vocational 
areas in which they have been assigned. 

The ultimate results of this program can only be determined as the school year 

42 






progresses and the achievement levels of these students are measured and compared 
with the skills necessary to enter industry and maintain employment. 

The 1972 summer program of vocational and academic courses at the Greater Law- 
rence Regional Vocational Technical High School showed a 250% increase in student 
enrollment from 161 students in 1971 to 405 students in 1972. This increase was due 
to an expanded program not only in the regular vocational and academic courses, but 
also entry into a Career Development-Exploratory system of related vocational disci- 
plines wherein the summer student who had successfully completed the seventh grade 
and was fourteen years of age could investigate career potentials in three different 
occupational areas. Specifically, the cluster program was scheduled as follows: 

Cluster #1 Cluster #2 Cluster #3 

Machine Drafting Small Appliance Repair Baking 

Metal Fabrication Electricity Chef Training 

Machine Shop Electronics Commercial Art 

Twenty teachers were employed in the total summer school program covering both 
the vocational and academic courses. In addition to the cluster courses, the fol- 
lowing disciplines were taught as full time summer school programs: 

Vocational Courses Academic Courses 

Electrical Remedial Reading 

Drafting Developmental English 

Automotive General Mathematics 

Metal Fabrication Pre-Algebra 

Machine Shop Algebra I 

Commercial Art Trigonometry 

Culinary Art Geometry 

Preparations are currently underway to accept a projected 750 students into the 
summer program for 1973 with expanded Career Development - Exploratory Courses in 
addition to new vocational courses currently being offered with the school's ex- 
panded facilities. 

The Industrial Entry-Career Development Program is an afterschool program open 
to all students of the region fourteen years of age or older. Classes are held on 
Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 3:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. for eighteen weeks 
during the regular school year. Transportation is provided by the Regional School, 
and students are picked up at their respective schools and returned to their home 
neighborhoods at the conclusion of classes. 

Older students enrolling in this program generally tend to concentrate all of 
their time in one vocational area acquiring the basic skills necessary to secure 
employment either on a part-time basis during school years or full-time employment 
following graduation from high school. 

The younger students gravitate toward the Career Exploratory courses which of- 
fer the opportunity to "work" in a variety of areas gaining a diversity of basic 
skills and an accurate knowledge of what each trade or technical area entails. It 
is from this experience that future vocational choices can be made by the student 
with a fuller knowledge of what is to be faced and gained in the years ahead. 

The Career-Exploratory Program offers students a choice of three specific vo- 
cational disciplines (clusters) that have been chosen for their diversity in some 
cases and for their similarity in other cases. The present format of clusters is 
listed below. 

Cluster #1 Cluster #2 Cluster #3 

Automotive Carpentry Autobody 

Drafting Culinary Art Commercial Art 

Metal Fabrication Machine Shop Electrical 

Clothing and Modeling 

43 



It is not uncommon for students to request specific courses in all three 
clusters, nor is it uncommon for students to request to remain in one area for the 
entire eighteen-week program. Such requests are honored whenever possible , as the 
entire approach is geared to have the students recognize the areas in which they 
have talent and liking as well as those areas which have no personal appeal. 

Evening School enrollment continued at the rate that has been maintained over 
the past several years. A number of new technical courses were added in the fields 
of Radio and Television Repair and Plastic Technology. Two general public interest 
courses were available: Stocks and Bonds and a short course in Tax Preparation. 

The Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School and the Ordnance 
Repair Platoon, United States Marine Corps Reserve unit stationed in Lawrence, began 
a pilot program to train reservists on weekends on the skills and techniques of Ma- 
chine Shop and Metal Fabrication and Welding. Spending sixteen hours per drill 
weekend over an eight-month period, the reservists were trained in the basic theory 
and practical application in both vocational disciplines. 

The program concluding in December of 1972 was labeled a success by both the 
school and the United States Marine Corps. 

What is significant in this pilot program is the school's ability through its 
facilities and personnel to adopt and meet the training needs of an organization, 
and the school's willingness to participate on a cooperative basis with all segments 
of the communities which it serves. 

Further, while Machine Shop and Metal Fabrication and Welding techniques may be 
vital to an Ordnance Platoon, the training received by the individual reservist 
could quite possibly form the foundation for future training and employment. 

Over and above the near completion of the new building and the increased stu- 
dent enrollment with expanded course offerings, the school has increased its Data 
Processing capability by acquisition of the EPIC system (Educational Programs In 
Cobol.) By upgrading the present computer installation, the school will be able to 
employ the computer to handle the school budget and financial operations, sched- 
uling, student records, and student testing. 

As soon as possible and when fully operative, the EPIC Program will be made 
available to schools in the region for budgets, scheduling, student records, and 
testing. It is not beyond the realm of possibility that municipal governments may 
also make use of the increased computer capacity. 

It is difficult to separate departments within the school from faculty members 
for the purposes of this report. Each Vocational and Academnic Department, while 
functioning as a unit, is closely related to all other Departments and the function- 
ing of the school as an educational institution. Cooperation is mandatory both on a 
Vocational and Academic basis if projects are to be completed and academic achieve- 
ment attained. 

All members of the faculty as of June, 1972, have completed the required hours 
of Professional Improvement either through college degree programs, specialized 
training in new fields, or conferences and seminars as approved by the Superintend- 
ent-Director. Individual instructors have traveled as far as Chicago and Detroit to 
gain expertise in new technologies and techniques. 

All of the Vocational Departments are continuously engaged in preparing work 
projects for local municipal and civic organizations and make themselves readily 
available to participate in functions which enhance the educational experience of 
the students and develop sound public relations for the school. 

Field trips to industrial sites form an integral part of the school's curric- 
ulum and serve to introduce the student to the variety and scope of the future em- 
ployment opportunities within a chosen field. Such visits help to strengthen the 
bond between the school and the industry of the region and often lead to donations 
of training materials and equipment on the part of industry to the school depart- 

44 



The Academic Departments have been given the responsibility of investigating 
and reporting on the best means of utilizing the lecture complex in the new building. 
Inherent in this research project is the careful study of present curriculum re- 
quirements as compared with current research findings in each specific discipline. 
The Math-Science Department has made curriculum adjustments, and the other Academic 
Departments are expected to follow the same procedure within the present school year 
in preparation for the school year 1973-74. 

For the past two school years the entire professional staff has been engaged in 
the ESCOE Project (Educational Service Center for Occupational Education) in conjunc- 
tion with vocational schools in the State of New York. The purpose of ESCOE was to 
compile curriculum data stated in Performance Objective form. The Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational Technical High School faculty contributed in excess of 3,000 
Performance or Behavioral Objectives to this project. 

At the present time the school is participating in the MISOE Project (Manage- 
ment Information System for Occupational Education) which in a very real sense is a 
continuation of ESCOE. The present project involves testing the validity of the 
Performance Objectives under actual classroom and shop or laboratory situations. 
The school itself is one of four vocational schools in the State of Massachusetts 
which will be used as a testing location. 

The eventual purpose of the MISOE Project is to give administrators and in- 
structors a firm data base upon which decisions affecting future directions in 
course content and teaching techniques can be made. At present, approximately fif- 
teen instructors and administrators are actively engaged in the MISOE Project with 
additional instructors and student personnel soon to be involved. 

The year 1972 can only be characterized by the term "growth." Yet in this con- 
text "growth" must be synonymous with "opportunity." The expanded school facilities 
in very simple terms means that a larger segment of the population within the school 
Region will be provided with the opportunity for more diversified training through 
an expanded curriculum and professional staff. 

It is the policy of the District Committee to meet the "Occupational Education" 
needs of the citizens of this region. It is also the policy of the District Com- 
mittee to help meet the needs of industry (the bulwark of our tax control and eco- 
nomic growth.) However, restraints must be exercised in terms of State and Federal 
funds available in addition to local taxes. 



9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


PG 1 


PG 


2 


03 


Total 


22 


19 


6 


9 


6 


11 


1 







3 


77 


331 


221 


150 


81 


53 


22 


15 




4 


1 


878 


124 


101 


58 


52 


23 


15 


8 




2 


3 


386 


15 


15 


11 


12 


5 


2 


2 










62 



Analysis of enrollment statistics indicates the following 
Day School Enrollment by Grade and Community: 
Municipality Grade 

Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 

492 356 225 154 87 50 

Evening School Enrollment by Community: 

Municipality 

Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 
Non-residents 

Total 1,760 



26 



Number of Students 

176 
809 
398 
105 
272 



7 1,403 



45 



Summer School Enrollment and Activity: 

Course 

Remedial Reading 

One Academic Course 

Two Academic Courses 

Cluster #1 

Cluster #2 

Cluster #3 

Automotive Mechanics 

Metal Fabrication & Welding 

Machine Shop 

Drafting 

Electrical 

Culinary Art 

Commercial Art 

Report on Graduates , June 1972 : 



Grade 



Number 
Graduated 



Grade 12 
Grade 14 
Post-Graduates 
L.P.N. 's 
Totals 



130 

13 

2 

1 
186 



Number 
Placed 

112 

6 

2 

41 

155 



Average 
Salary 

2.27 hr, 
3.00 hr, 
3.00 hr, 
3.00 hr, 



Number of Students 

35 
64 
86 
42 
52 
45 
27 

2 

4 

1 

7 
21 
19 



405 



Armed 
Services 

4 
1 


5 



Higher 
Education 

13 

1 


_0 
14 



PERSONNEL STATISTICS 



Administration : 

(Superintendent of District . 

(Director of School 

Assistant Directors 

Vocational Coordinator. . . . 
Pupil Personnel Services 

Coordinator 

Expansion Aide 

Office Personnel: 

Principal Clerks 

Senior Clerk 

Junior Clerks 

Part-time Clerks 

Instructional : 

Academic Instructors 

Related Technology Instructors 
Shop & Laboratory Instructors 

Librarian 

Counselors 

Summer School Instructors . . 

Non-instruct ional : 

Nurse 

Audio-Visual Aide 

Cafeteria : 

Manager 

Full-time workers , 

Part-time workers , 



1/2 

1/2 

2 

2 

1 

1 



27 
21 
51 
1 
3 
20 



1 
1 

1 

1 

18 



Non-instructional (cont.): 

Custodial & Bus Driving: 

Plant Superintendent 1 

Custodians 12 

Transportation : 

Buses 6 

Evening School: 

Supervision 3 

Instructors 63 

Industrial Entry (High School Students): 

Supervision 1 

Instructors 19 



Athletics : 

Sports 



Coaches 



Basketball 3 

Baseball 3 

Football 6 

Track 3 

Cross Country 1 

Wrestling 2 

Indoor Track 2 

Hockey 1 

Athletics Coordinator 1 

Golf 1 

Field Hockey 1 

Basketball, Female 1 



46 



TOTAL 1972 DISTRICT BUDGET 



$2,753,880 



Funds for Reduction: 



School Building Assis 


tance Bureau 


$198,500 










Pupil Transportation 


Re imbursement 


44,645 










P.L. 90-576 






19,428 










P.L. 81-874 






9,200 










Chapter 791 


- 1971 




562,941 










Chapter 791 


- 1970 balance 


26,488 




$861,202 






1971 Unexpended Funds 


available & 


applied 




200,000 




1,061,202 


NET 


TOTAL 












$1,692,678 


BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF ] 


DISTRICT 


. 








Total 


3 


Payments 


L Payment 






Payment 
$113,765.52 




@ 


$ 


@ 


Andover 


$ 


28,441.38 


28,441.38 


Lawrence 




$957, 


292.03 


$239,323.00 


$239,323.03 


North Andover 


$112, 


699.19 


$ 


28,174.79 


$ 


28,174.82 


Methuen 




$508, 


921.26 


$127,230.31 


$127,230.33 






BUDGET REPORT FOR 1972 














Transfers 


Adjusted 












Budget 


Within 


Budget 




Total 






Function 


Dollars 


Functions 


Dollars 




Expenditures 


Balance 


General Control $ 


85,622 


$ 


$ 85,622 




$ 76,047 




$ 9,575 


Expense of 
















Instruction 1 


,359,500 


(5,028) 


1,354,472 




1,255,668 




98,804 


Auxiliary 
















Agencies 


110,243 


17,808 


128,051 




128,051 







Cost of Trans- 
















portation 


74,332 


2,318 
(12,725)1 


63,925 




63,460 




465 


Operation of 
















Plant 


208,270 


(4,381) 


203,899 




203,436 




453 


Maintenance of 
















Plant 


87,353 


2,517 


89,870 




89,770 




100 


Special Charges 


78,080 


1,810 


79,890 




79,715 




175 


Miscellaneous 


8,290 


900 


9,190 




8,990 




200 


Outlay 


84,170 


(15,944) 


68,226 




67,017 




1,209 


Debt Retirement 


370,000 




370,000 




370,000 







Debt Service 


288,020 
,753,880 




288,020 
$2,741,155 




288,020 
$2,630,174 







$2 





$110,981** 



* Pupil transportation reimbursement $61,607 
** $110,981.09 unexpended 1972 budget funds. $100,000 of this was allotted 
by School Committee to reduce 1973-74 (18-month) budget 



During the past year Civil Defense, in conjunction with the Police Department 
and the Fire Department, participated in an exercise of a simulated plane crash in 
Methuen which was sponsored by the Merrimack Valley Health Planning Commission. 

The Radiological Monitoring Kits were updated during the year, and the communi- 
cations group participated in an exercise for testing equipment which was a simulated 
hurricane. 

47 



A recording system for both the Police and Civil Defense Departments was made 
available through Surplus Property. 

The Director participated in the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission's Commun- 
ity Shelter Program, and he attended a three-day Federally-sponsored program on civil 
preparedness. He attended all meetings and seminars held by either the Federal or 
State Agencies and continued to act as liaison for the Town and these agencies. 



Weights and Measures 



A total of 15,776 items were inspected for proper labeling, weight, count, and 
volume content. 8,310 items were found to be correct, while 2,122 items were found 
to be deficient in either weight or volume. 5,344 items inspected for weight and 
volume content were found to contain an amount in excess of declared quantity. 

The Department sealed 241 weighing and measuring devices, adjusted 31, attached 
a NOT SEALED label on one unit, and found it necessary to CONDEMN four units. 

Sealing fees for 1972 amounted to $365.00. Fees collected through December 31, 
1972, amounted to $336.50 which has been paid to the Town Treasurer. 



Building 



The purpose and scope of the Andover Building Code is to provide for safety, 
health, and public welfare through structural strength and stability, adequate 
egress, proper light and ventilation, and protection of life and property from fire 
hazards incident to design. 

Enforcement of the Town Building Code is the responsibility of the Building 
Inspector. He is also the enforcing officer for the Town Zoning Bylaws with his 
rulings subject to the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

All Board of Appeals applications are reviewed and processed through this of- 
fice; and, in addition, copies of its definitive action on all petitions are kept 
for the convenience of the general public. 

Electrical Permits are also issued by this department with the approval of the 
Electrical Inspector. Related records, fees, and reports are also maintained by 
this office for all three departments. 

Three permits for Gravel Pits were granted the past year under Article VIII, 
Section VI-E-1.1. Four other permits for Miscellaneous Removal of Soil Incidental 
to Improvements were granted under Article VIII, Section VI-E-1.3. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, as required in the Bylaws, all estab- 
lishments for license issuance were investigated, and reports were filed with the 
Town Manager. 

Under the direction of the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen, an overall 
survey was made of the Town in the early spring for junk car violations, followed by 
written notices sent to all violators. This was a tremendous task but worthy of the 
action. 

Numerous building and zoning violations were investigated and corrected without 
incident. The Building Inspector attended several courses of advanced education 
sponsored by the Commonwealth and Building Inspectors' organizations. 

1972 was a banner year for building and alterations as indicated by the issu- 
ance of 613 building permits which included a record of 205 single family homes. 

48 



Final totals show an estimated valuation of $7,900,432, with $22,286 in Permit Fees 
being returned to the Town Treasurer. 

Following is a tabulation of the Building Permits issued for the years 1968 
through 1972: 

TYPE ESTIMATED VALUATION PERMIT FEES 

1968 

148 Dwellings & Garages $ 3,748,028.00 

27 Other Buildings 5,768,530.00 
251 Additions & Alterations 802,590.00 

87 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 295,425.00 

513 $10,614,573.00 $24,372.00 

13 Soil Removals 39.00 

1969 $24,411.00 

131 Dwellings & Garages $ 3,509,700.00 

28 Other Buildings 11,833,200.00 
200 Additions & Alterations 471,655.00 
107 Others (raze, sign, swimming 

pools, etc.) 129,159.00 

466 $15,943,714.00 $45,831.00 

1 Soil Removal 12.00 

1970 $45,843.00 

85 Dwellings & Garages $ 2,370,500.00 

6 Other Buildings 949,500.00 

224 Additions & Alterations 947,575.00 

97 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 200,175.00 

412 $ 4,467,750.00 $13,205.00 

3 Soil Removals 39.00 

1971 $13,244.00 

114 Dwellings & Garages $ 2,882,194.00 

45 Other Buildings 5,513,249.00 

229 Additions & Alterations 4,150,940.00 

76 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc. 166,370.00 

464 $12,712,753.00 $23,253.00 

1972 

205 Dwellings & Garages $ 5,612,000.00 
62 Other Buildings 743,420.00 
240 Additions & Alterations 1,378,722.00 
102 Others (raze, sign, swimming 
pools, etc.) 166,290.00 

609 $ 7,900,432.00 $22,235.00 

4 Soil Removals 51.00 

$22,286.00 



49 



School Department 



Following report prepared by Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert, for 
insertion in the Town Report: 

"The Andover Public Schools in 1972 continued to be significantly affected by 
world and national issues. A bomb dropped on Hanoi was immediately felt in a math- 
ematics class at the high school and was more important than trigonometry for that 
moment. As a result of the news media, our youth of today are responding to many 
more concerns than the student of past decades . Some of our present approaches 
should belong to history but change in education is easier said than done. 

"The results of the questionnaire prepared by the Climate for Learning Committee 
confirmed two significant assumptions about the Andover community. One, the commun- 
ity must be better informed regarding the activities of our schools. Although, by 
most yardsticks, we have an excellent public information program for a school system, 
we need to find new ways to communicate with those citizens not actively involved or 
interested in public school education. 

"A second assumption was the variety of expectations for the school system. In 
other words, the citizens of Andover are far from agreement on the role our schools 
should play in society. I would like to share some observations with you. In An- 
dover, I see four views that seem to be competing for the schools' and our children s 
future . 

"1. A traditional view of education. This expectation seeks to perpetuate 
education as it was, with some slight modifications but no essential 
redirection. 

"2. A respectful awe of technology. This expectation views children as 
receiving technological benefits and as potential participants in 
technological advancement. 

"3. The third view springs from a disapproval of the first two. This ex- 
pectation seeks to turn its back on today's society and to return to 
a simple life, to find a true humanity and to restore the communion 
of man with the earth. 

"4. Man determining his destiny. This expectation recognizes that ma- 
chines must work for man, and that knowledge without social respon- 
sibility and emotional commitment to human life has led us to our 
present world state of affairs. 

"Admittedly, this is an oversimplification of a complex phenomenon; but we, as 
educators, feel these differences which pose a nation-wide dilemma for us all. 

"In last year's report, I mentioned the need for alternative approaches in our 
schools. We have begun to make progress this year. It would be unrealistic to as- 
sume that in any community of 23,000 citizens everyone could have the same expecta- 
tion of education. In this past year we have been receiving 'mandates' representing 
each of the four viewpoints that school must serve one particular philosophy rela- 
tive to how children should be educated. Although such demands are understandable, 
it would be a mistake to respond to them because the entire public must be served 
equally. The citizens elect the officials they feel represent their thoughts. The 
School Committee establishes policies and directs the administration to achieve 
these directions through a qualified staff. To react to and accept a proposal from 
a few that affects the entire community would be to go against the process of democ- 
racy we cherish. 

"One overriding goal of this system is to help educate happy, productive students 
who will contribute positively to society. To achieve this we need a variety of 
structures and methods because our children need them. We must always educate our 

50 






children based on their needs and what we feel the future requires. We must not 
educate our youth based on community pressure or what was good enough for us as stu- 
dents. Those were different times. 

"Andover has a competent, unselfish staff of educators, an enlightened school 
committee, and a citizenry that prides itself on the educational environment one 
finds here. The programs pursued in our curriculum are founded on sound educational 
concepts that have been proven to be successful. Future changes that are advocated 
will always be based on the above considerations. You can be assured that alterna- 
tives are being implemented and others being planned to accommodate our children and 
the future they face. 

"Upon close observation of the expectations described earlier, I don't see any 
conflict if they can be woven together — stability, technological application, self- 
reliance, and problem solving with a definite concern for humanity. 

"Just out of curiosity, what is your expectation of education?" 

Merrimack Valley Planning Commission 

The Merrimack Valley Planning Commission (MVPC) , formerly the Central Merrimack 
Valley Regional Planning District Commission, a regional planning organization of 
cities and towns created under Chapter 40B of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, 
has continuously expanded since its creation in 1959. The following communities are 
now members: cities of Haverhill, Lawrence, and Newburyport ; towns of Amesbury, And- 
over, Georgetown, Groveland, Merrimac, Methuen, North Andover, Salisbury, and West 
Newbury. Nonmember communities are the towns of Boxford, Newbury, and Rowley. The 
responsibilities for regional planning, however, encompass all fifteen communities, 
regardless of membership. The total population of the region in 1970 was 247,891 
(U.S. Census, 1970) in a 268 square mile area. 

Regular meetings of the Commission are held on the third Thursday of each month, 
and they are open to the public. Through the cooperation of the staff at the North- 
east Regional Center, State Department of Education, 565 Chickering Road, North An- 
dover, the Commission has held its regular monthly meetings at this location for the 
past year. 

Each community is represented by one member appointed from the Planning Board 
and one alternate appointed by the Mayor, Town Manager, or Selectmen. The officers 
of the Commission elected in April, 1972, were: Chairman, John J. Monteiro, North 
Andover; Vice-Chairman, William E. Slusher, Groveland; Treasurer, John A. Stundza, 
Lawrence; Assistant Treasurer, E. James Gaines, Newburyport; and Secretary, John W. 
Regan, Methuen. 

The staff of the Commission grew in 1972 with the addition of a new Senior Plan- 
ner, Junior Planner, Office Secretary, and Enrironmental Specialist. In addition to 
the Executive Director, the staff now includes two Senior Planners, two Junior Plan- 
ners, an Environmental Specialist, and two Office Secretaries. 

During 1972 the Commission focused its efforts on the long range problems of 
housing, pollution of the Merrimack River, transportation, and solid waste. The MVPC 
became the first regional planning agency in Massachusetts to actively begin the 
development of a Fair Share formula for the distribution of subsidized housing units 
among its fifteen cities and towns. Public meetings were held with citizens, offic- 
ials, and other professional planners in the region. Valuable feedback was obtained 
from these meetings. The final report and conclusions will be available in the 
opening months of 1973. 

During the year the Commission began work with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers 
on an 18-month study of the Massachusetts portion of the Merrimack River titled Mer - 
rimack Wastewater Management Study . The thrust of the study will be to examine the 
causes, alternatives, and solutions of pollution in the river. An extensive citizen 

51 



participation process to evaluate the study and aid in the selection of the final 
solution will be the Commission's major involvement. 

1972 also saw transportation planning for the region enter a new phase through 
the establishment of the 3-C (Comprehensive, Cooperative, Continuing) transportation 
planning process. The foundation of the process is the Memorandum of Understanding, 
which was entered into between the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission and the Ex- 
ecutive Office of Transportation and Construction. The Memorandum established a 
mechanism to arrive at consensus solutions to transportation problems, both local 
and regional. Through a contract in 1973 with the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works (MDPW) , the MVPC will be provided with additional staff to examine, study, and 
develop solutions for problems in all phases of transportation. 

In conjunction with the Bureau of Solid Waste Disposal of the MDPW, the MVPC be- 
came involved in the Solid Waste problems of the region, and it will recommend long 
term regional solutions to solid waste disposal in 1973. 

In addition to these major areas, the Commission continued to review both State 
and local Federal Grant applications for consistency with Regional Plans and poli- 
cies; began to expand the regional Open Space Plan to include recreational needs; 
continued to provide technical assistance to member communities upon request; and is 
working to establish an open planning process to involve all citizens of the region 
in all phases of the planning process. 

As the above activities indicate, the Commission is deeply involved in some im- 
portant planning processes and issues. These processes will provide a basis for 
solution of problems which go beyond the boundaries of individual communities and 
affect the citizens of the entire region. 



Community Organizer 



The position of Community Organizer was created in December, 1971, at the re- 
quest of the Town Manager and the Greater Lawrence Community Drug Council. It is 
presently funded under the Emergency Employment Act. Its function is to plan, di- 
rect, and coordinate a comprehensive "Youth-in-Crisis" program for the Town of An- 
dover . The Community Organizer works as a Town employee under the administrative 
direction of the Town Manager and is a staff member of the drug program sponsored by 
the Greater Lawrence Community Drug Council, under the guidance of its Executive Di- 
rector. 

A selection committee composed of Israel Lichtman, former Assistant to the Town 
Manager; Raymond Tague, Executive Director of the Greater Lawrence Community Drug 
Council; and Dr. Joseph Harrington interviewed candidates for the position. On 
their recommendation Wilfred Harvey was hired. 

After two years in the A.B. Honors Program at Boston College, Mr. Harvey earned 
an L. PH. from St. Thomas University in Rome (1959) and STL, also from St. Thomas, 
in 1963. He has done graduate work in Religious Education and Anthropology at Cath- 
olic University and Boston University and has instructed in these areas. He has 
participated in lab training in Human Relations and Organizational Development, been 
on the staff for the Ecumenical Leadership Training Program, and been a consultant 
in educational design and personal growth labs at The Center in Natick, Massachusetts. 
In November, 1972, he graduated from the Attorney General's 24th Basic Drug Abuse Ed- 
ucational School. 

Due to the high cost of repairs and maintenance, initial plans to use 22 Cen- 
tral Street as a base of operation proved to be impractical. The Shawsheen Recrea- 
tion Building on Iceland Road was used for only a short period of time because of 
complaints from concerned neighbors. South Church then offered the use of their fa- 
cilities. These proved to be adequate for meetings. The search for a permanent lo- 
cation came to an end in May when the program moved into one of the units owned by 
Plaza Associates in Shawsheen Plaza (in front of United Rent-All.) This facility is 

52 



referred to as the Andover Storefront . Furniture for the storefront was obtained 
from government surplus through the efforts of John Lewis, Federal/State Coordinator. 

During the early months of 1972 much time and energy was expended making contact 
with school authorities, teachers, and counselors as well as students. March was 
important for two reasons — first, arrangements were made for a group of interested 
young people and adults to participate in an all-day Youth Awareness Program (YAP); 
second, two Boston University graduate students, Eleanor May and Arlene Zwicker, be- 
gan a semester of in-service training as counselors with high school students. 

The free clinic (Bon Secours-Lawrence General Hospitals) and residential pro- 
gram (Challenge House) and professional resources are among cooperative efforts on a 
community-wide basis developed under the aegis of the Greater Lawrence Community 
Drug Council with its three other storefront operations. Since December, Will Harvey 
has been co-leading a group at the Lawrence House of Correction. 

An assistant was hired under the Summer EEA program for the summer months al- 
lowing for an expansion of services. With her assistance and the cooperation of the 
Recreation/Community Schools Department, several successful outdoor films and con- 
certs were offered at the Andover High School grounds. 

Present emphasis has been on counseling and education. The center seeks to de- 
velop awareness on the part of youth and their parents concerning the various help- 
ful resources available in the area (schools, counselors, churches, professionals of 
all kinds) and will provide counseling services of the self-help type in the form of: 

(1) one-to-one interviews, rap sessions, and referrals for youth on a walk-in basis; 

(2) rap sessions and interviews for parents; and (3) living room dialogues for par- 
ents. Should the interviews or behavior in rap groups suggest it, the student would 
be advised to consider testing and/or further treatment from more specialized agen- 
cies . 

Following are rough statistics on the number of youth and adults who have been 
served through the Community Organizer and Andover Storefront since the beginning of 
1972: 

Youth Parents 
Individuals 39 19 

Groups 31 22 

One-time Rap 23 21 

Referrals from schools 25 

Many more have profited indirectly from the services. 

The work to date with the schools has pointed up the importance of reaching 
larger numbers of students. An in-service training program for teachers is pres- 
ently being formulated. The aim of this program is to help teachers work more ef- 
fectively with youth in crisis. 

Also in the planning stage is the establishment of a location at the High 
School to be used for meetings and referrals. This project is a cooperative venture 
of the Health and Guidance Department, High School authorities, the Storefront, and 
a group of concerned students . 

The Andover Storefront (telephone: 475-0597) is open from 10:00 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. Evenings the facility is used for organized groups and appointments. 

Fourth of July Celebration 

Andover's Third Annual Fourth of July Celebration was held on Tuesday, the 
Fourth, and brought with it good weather, good fun, and good crowds. With 1920 
prices of everything for one thin dime, the hot dogs, soft drinks, cotton candy, and 
snow cones tasted especially good; the ponies, fire engine, merry-go-round, and the 
many other games and rides were extra fun; and the music, contests, and fireworks 

53 



drew the largest crowds yet. 

Under the direction of the Andover Service Club, the Fourth of July Committee, 
with John D. Lewis again as Chairman, was activated. Through the cooperation of 
many, including the Board of Public Works, the Recreation/Community Schools Depart- 
ment, and many other organizations, the event was once more a memorable success. 
Special thanks from the townspeople go to the Andover Service Club, Knights of Co- 
lumbus, Andona Society, League of Women Voters, Andover Village Garden Club, Masons, 
4H Club, Andover Art Guild, and many local businesses for their help, both financial 
and physical. 

As we look to the future, the Town has certainly started out in the right di- 
rection towards our big 1976 celebration. 



D.S.S.B.C. 



The Doherty-Shawsheen Schools Building Committee met for the first time in 
June, 1972, to carry out the dictates of Article 47 of the 1972 Town Meeting, i.e., 
to proceed with the hiring of an architect to prepare preliminary plans, working 
drawings, and bid specifications for renovations to the Doherty and Shawsheen 
Schools. 

After interviewing eight architects, the committee and Town Manager selected 
the firm of Johnson, Hotvedt and Associates, Inc., Boston, Mass., to proceed with 
the project; and the Town of Andover entered into a contract with this firm to carry 
out the mandates of Article 47. 

The architect, Building Committee, and school administrators collaborated on 
the initial planning and preliminary plans. In November both the School Committee 
and the Massachusetts School Building Assistance Bureau approved the preliminary 
plans. This action enabled the project to move forward and insured the sixty-five 
per cent funding from the State. 

The final working drawings and bid specifications were approved in January, and 
the project officially went to bid in early February of 1973. Sub-bids will be taken 
February 26, 1973, and General Contract Bids will be taken on March 5, 1973. This 
will enable bids to be evaluated and analyzed prior to Town Meeting on March 19, 
1973, the date on which this particular Article will be considered by the voters. 



John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund 



On January 15, 1972, the Trustees voted to consolidate all funds into the 
Andover Savings Bank, said funds to be accounted for by the Town Treasurer with au- 
thorization by at least two of the Trustees. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1972 $7,862.21 

Receipts, 1972 Interest 413.65 $8,275.86 

Disbursements, 1972 (2 vouchers) 122.85 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1973 $8,153.01 



54 



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55 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
JURY LIST - JUNE 1973 



Ackroyd, Daniel M. 
Ainscow, George W. 
Aitel, Moe Lawrence 
Alden, Richard L. 
Anderson, Charles W. Jr. 
Anderson, Louis H. 
Armstrong, Dan B. 
Atchison, John H. Jr. 
Axelrod, Harry 
Awley, Arthur Jr. 
Barous, Constance M. 
Barton, Joseph F. 
Batchelder, Ruth E. 
Batcheller, Harold B. Jr. 
Bauman, Ralph E. 
Baxter, James G. 
Bayliss, Frank B. 
Beanland, John E. 
Belisle, Everett L. Jr. 
Belloir, Shirley R. 
Berube, Raymond L. 
Bissonnette, Ralph A. 
Bodge, Bernice D. 
Bolduc, Joseph R. 
Born, Elizabeth G. 
Bradshaw, Robert H. 
Brennan, Thomas P. 
Briggs, Winston C. 
Brightman, Irene B. 
Brouck, Isabel M. 
Bullock, Emily 
Burbine, William 
Burleigh, Winslow F. 
Burns, Charles E. 
Burwell, Grant H. 
Bush, Frances E. 
Cady, Edith M. 
Campagna, Michael J. 
Campbell, Andrew 
Campbell, Daisy G. 
Carmichael, James G. 
Caswell, Walter C. 
Clendaniel, W. Richard 
Clinton, Arthur R. 
Clotworthy, Frances D. 
Connolly, Helen M. 
Cookson, Harold T. 
Cookson, Katherine 
Cronin, Joseph A. 
Cratty, Jeannine F. 
Curran, James 
Cushing, Richard H. 
Daniels, Richard W. 
Darby, Merwyn K. 
Darby, Thomas M. 
Dargie, Philip A. 
Davis, Geoffrey S. 



Claims Representative 

Section Chief 

Engineer 

Loan Officer 

Real Estate Appraiser 

Regional Manager 

Department Chief 

Staff Engineer 

Pres. and Treas. 

Asst. Manager 

Bookkeeper 

Operator 

Housewife 

Salesman 

Project Engineer 

Laundry Attendant 

Electrical Engineer 

Tax Examiner 

Manager-Florist Center 

Supervisor 

Supervisor 

Inspector 

Homemaker 

Postal Clerk 

Housewife 

Quality Control 

Storekeeper 

Territorial Representative 

Tax Examiner 

Spooler 

At Home 

Trucker 

Retired 

Collection Manager 

Electrical Engineer 

Homemaker 

Part-time Secretary 

Paper Salesman 

Insurance Salesman 

Housewife 

Manager 

Retired 

Engineer 

Insurance Broker 

Housewife 

Quality Control Inspector 

Electronic Distributor 

Housewife 

Stationary Fireman 

Housewife 

Kitchen Aide 

Maintenance Electrician 

Electrical Engineer 

Shipper 

Factory Superintendent 

Technical Manager 

Purchasing Manager 



6 Miles Circle 
59 Love joy Road 
276 Andover Street 

33 Porter Road 
19 Beech Circle 

26 Morton Street 
40 Linwood Street 

3 Harvard Road 

27 Alden Road 
16 Avon Street 

98 Central Street 

34 Florence Street 
91 Ballardvale Road 
11 Lincoln Street 

2 Carisbrooke Street 
43 Lowell Street 

35 Washington Avenue 
120 North Main Street 
125 Bellevue Road 
131 Andover Street 

23 Topping Road 

62 Haverhill Street 

4 Henderson Avenue 

14 Brechin Terrace 

21 Canterbury Street 
211 Beacon Street 

45 High Street 
23 Arundel Street 
57 High Plain Road 
256 Andover Street 

15 West Knoll Road 
52 York Street 

14 Arthur Road 
51 Marilyn Road 

15 Pine Street 

204 Haggetts Pond Rd. 

5 Shipman Road 

28 Theodore Avenue 
135 Abbot Street 
98 Cheever Circle 
59 Whittier Street 
5 Dumbarton Street 
5 Lockway Road 

50 Elm Street 
159 Holt Road 
15 Avon Street 
197 River Road 
197 River Road 
23 Center Street 
139 Chestnut Street 
28 Essex Street 

22 Arthur Road 

4 Mitton Circle 

51 Clark Road 

11 Wolcott Avenue 

5 Patricia Circle 
8 Dumbarton Street 



56 



Dearborn, Lauren R. 
Dengler, Erdmuth 
Denoncourt, William R. 
Desrocher, Edward C. 
Doherty, James D. 
Dolan, James F. 
Douglass, Bruce E. 
Driscoll, Joseph G. 
Duffy, Joseph T. 
Dunn, Donald D. 
Dwyer, Edward F. 
Dye, Thomas J. 
Earnshaw, Clarence 
Eisenhaur, Donald N. 
Elder, Robert W. 
Essiambre, Ruth 
Evans, James B. Jr. 
Fenton, Margery D. 
Fiedler, Wallace C. 
Fleming, David A. Jr. 
Folley, Herbert R. 
Forma, Bette E. 
Fredrickson, Robert A. 
Gaudet, Joseph A. 
Gerraughty, James V. 
Gerrish, Winifred S. 
Glennon, Alfred W. 
Goodman, George E. 
Gould, Richard F. 
Gray, Arthur G. Jr. 
Grecoe, John H. 
Green, Gerard K. 
Greenberg, Albert J. 
Greenhow, John M. Jr. 
Guillet, Arthur 0. 
Guilmette, Richard P. J. 
Ha Her, Harold 
Hamilton, Howard C. 
Hannon, John J. 
Hardy, John F. 
Harig, Karl G. Jr. 
Harris, Lester E. 
Hart, William J. 
Hatch, Grace M. 
Hayes, Ruth 
Hershon, Paul 
Higgins, John G. 
Holdsworth, Gordon H. 
Homsey, Emily W. 
Hood, Thomas M. 
Hoyer, Mary 
Hoyt, Robert S. Jr. 
Hudson, William T. 
Inman, Glenn W. 
Innes, Robert B. 
Johnson, Charles M. 
Johnson, Mitchell, Jr. 
Jones, Nancy J. 
Kaczynski, Charles S. 
Keaney, Sylvester A. Jr. 
Kellogg, Juliet R. 
Kempton, Albert E. 
Kenney, Allan R. 
Kenney, Robert P. 
Kibbee, Arthur S. 
Kinnear, Jessie A. 



Inspector 

Library Assistant 

Department Chief 

Maintenance 

Treas. and General Manager 

District Manager 

Construction Supt. 

Pressman 

Superintendent 

Retired 

Tester 

Sales-Shoe Last Mfr. 

Admin. Assistant 

Foreman 

Manager 

Housewife 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Supervisor 

Program-Mfg. Coordinator 

Stock Man 

Homemaker 

Asst. Art Director 

Sr. Standard Coordinator 

President and Treasurer 

Housewife 

Retired 

Retail Chain-President 

Industrial Engineer 

Layout Operator 

Jeweler 

Reg. Representative 

Consulting Engineer 

Field Engineer 

Technician 

Technician 

Office Service Manager 

Department Chief 

Engineer 

Program Manager 

Automobile Salesman 

Senior Engineer 

Merchandise Packer 

Part-time Assistant 

At Home 

Auditing Supervisor 

Investment Broker 

Project Technician 

Head Desk Clerk 

Asst. Secretary 

Homemaker 

Designer 

Manager-Quality Assurance 

Facilities Director 

Senior Engineer 

Foreman 

Mfg. Manager 

Housewife 

Tool maker 

Retired 

Assoc. Archivist 

Mechanical Engineer 

Civil Engineer 

Sales Representative 

Shipper 

Clerk-Typist 



109 Elm Street 

5 Lincoln Circle 
11 Marion Avenue 
21 Florence Street 
9 Juniper Road 

24 Bannister Road 
19 Pasho Street 

24 Juliette Street 
97 Love joy Road 

9 Sutherland Street 
11 Shepley Street 

25 Smithshire Ests. 
287 North Main St. 

11 Pine Tree Lane 
68 Love joy Road 
76 Gould Road 

10 Ivy Lane 

140 Chestnut Street 
36 Chandler Circle 
14 Elysian Drive 
75 Essex Street 

12 Barrington Drive 

16 Arundel Street 
4 Juliette Street 
30 Bannister Road 

27 Enmore Street 

17 Carisbrooke St. 

4 Joyce Terrace 

6 Stratford Road 
90 Bellevue Road 
17 Florence Street 
12 Avon Street 
123 North Street 
38 Maple Avenue 

1 Walnut Avenue 
Off Beacon Street 

2 Kenilworth Street 
14 Ballardvale Road 

5 Apollo Circle 
1 Beech Circle 

3 Patricia Circle 
16 Princeton Avenue 

6 Henderson Avenue 
116 Wild Rose Drive 

28 Phillips Street 

6 Argyle Street 
Timothy Drive 

7 Howell Drive 

27 High Plain Road 
6 Juniper Road 
66 Wildwood Drive 
53 Carmel Road 
151 Osgood Street 
5 Stinson Road 
57 Juniper Road 
82 Woburn Street 
71 Central Street 
157 Hidden Road 
79 Lowell Jet. Road 

4 Carisbrooke St. 
35 Hidden Road 

55 Summer Street 

8 Chatham Road 
44 Birch Road 
78 Maple Avenue 
128 Main Street 



57 



Koch, Alfred 
Kocher, Daniel W. 
Krikorian, Michael H. 
LeGendre, Alice R. 
Lewis, Warren A. 
Look, Robert E. 
Looraer, Barbara A. 
Lounsbury, Richard L. 
Lynch, Raymond 
MacKenzie, William 
MacLeish, Russell C. 
Marruzzi, Virginia H. 
Mason, Robert F. 
Maxwell, Allen R. 
McCabe, Edwin C. 
McCarthy, Irene H. 
McLean, Joh n 
McNally, Donald W. 
Mears, Louise E. 
Miller, Alwyne C. 
Miller, Frances S. 
Miller, Norman L. 
Mitchell, Douglas F. 
Mitchener, Paul E. 
Mitton, Barbara A. 
Moriarty, John P. 
Moriarty, Wilfred D. 
Moriarty, William E. 
Moulton, Cecil J. , Jr. 
Nadeau, Aime G. 
Nardone, Philip A. 
Neil, Robert W. 
Ness, Mary A. 
Neunzer, Eric H. 
Nor t hup, Robert G. 
Occhipinti, Joseph 
O'Connor, Donald T. 
Orlando, Frank J. 
Osborne, Robert J. 
O'Toole, Austin P. 
Partridge, Walter H. 
Pendleton, Andrew S. Jr. 
Pendleton, Leona M. 
Pettit, Stephen H. 
Poland, Frank S. 
Pope, Ruth A. 
Potter, Jean W. 
Poulin, Donald J. 
Price, Thomas D. 
Quintal, Dorothy J. 
Rairigh, Mildred W. 
Ratyna, Edward 
Reed, Theodore W. 
Reidy, John J. 
Roberts, Margaret C. 
Rice, Norman W. Jr. 
Richards, George J. 
Richmond, Robert R. 
Rinker, Thomas A. 
Robinson, David D. 
Robinton, Charles T. 
Rollins, Philip E. 
Ruhl, Malcolm J. 
Ryan, Richard H. 
Ryder, Eleanor M. 



Test Engineer 

Senior Engineer 

Superintendent 

Housewife 

Investment Banker 

President 

Exec. Director 

Retired 

Shipper 

Lay-out Man 

Exec. Sales Repr. 

Bookkeeper 

Electronic Technician 

Personnel Director 

Retired 

Social Worker 

Inspector 

Woodworking Mach. Oper. 

Homemaker 

Layout & Utility Man 

Housewife 

Vice-Pres. Bank 

Manager 

Sales Manager 

Teacher Aide 

Staff Associate 

Clerk 

Bank President 

Financial Officer 

Retired 

Owner-Oil Burner Inst. 

Production Analyst 

Clerk 

Press Feeder 

Aircraft Mechanic 

Inventory Control 

Production Control 

Land Surveyor 

Manager-Eng. Operations 

Draftsman 

Chief Mechanical Engr. 

Unemployed 

Tax Examiner 

Retired Accountant 

Welder 

Housewife 

Library Co-Director 

Engineer 

Staff Engineer 

Retired 

Housewife 

Commercial Artist 

Sales Supervisor 

Store Manager 

Tax Examiner 

Working Foreman 

Die Maker 

Production Manager 

Cert. Public Acct. 

Architectural Draftsman 

Test Supervisor 

Chief Pumping Stat. Oper, 

Self-employed 

Program Analyst 

Welcome Wagon Hostess 



71 Osgood Street 

6 Oriole Drive 

22 Gleason Street 
4 Burton Farm Drive 

7 Kirkland Drive 
19 Kirkland Drive 

18 Osgood Street 
103 Gould Road 
16 Cuba Street 
215 Lowell Street 

10 Thresher Road 
3 Hall Avenue 

50 Brookfield Road 
16 Upland Road 

16 Robandy Road 
74 Morton Street 

8 Cuba Street 

140 Andover Street 
245 Andover Street 
B-2 Colonial Drive 

17 Lowell Street 
17 Lowell Street 
172 High Plain Road 

2 Oriole Drive 

84 Tewksbury Street 
30 Sunset Rock Road 
55 Elm Street 

8 Locke Street 

9 Dean Circle 
156 High Street 
89 Lowell Street 
49 Balmoral Street 

19 Alderbrook Road 

54 Stevens Street 
76 River Street 
289 Lowell Street 

11 Carlisle Street 
65 Stevens Street 
101 Central Street 
7 Carlisle Street 
47 Bartlet Street 
11 Osgood Street 
11 Osgood Street 

1 Longwood Drive 
9 Wildwood Road 

55 Haggetts Pond Road 
26 Bancroft Road 

15 Beech Circle 
38 Mary Lou Lane 
53 Abbot Street 

3 Old South Lane 
21 Brechin Terrace 
11 Cabot Road 

17 Flint Circle 
52 Pine Street 
81 Bellevue Road 

29 County Road 

30 Bancroft Road 

2 Hidden Road 

11 Wild Rose Drive 
15 Lincoln Circle 
397 Lowell Street 
42 Walnut Avenue 
70 Morton Street 
186 Chestnut Street 



58 



Saba, Stanley 
Sabbagh, Linda H. 
Seikunas, Ruth E. 
Sapienza, Cecilia K. 
Shaw, Anne B. 
Shaw, Gardner R. 
Shaw, Patricia C. 
Shea, Cornelius D. 
Shearston, David W. 
Shepherd, Frank 
Sherman, Frank J. 3rd 
Sherman, Robert E. 
Sherrerd, George H. 
Simpson, Edward F. 
Slater, Herbert M. 
Smeltzer, Allan J. 
Smith, Dorothy E. 
Smith, George W. 
Smyth, Charles W. 
Solomon, Arlene 
Southwell, Lynn C. 
Spinney, Donald A. 
Sproul, Norman D. 
Stedman, Gordon I. 
Stevenson, Frank B. 
Stewart, Aubery A. 
Stewart, William J. 
St. Germain, Raymond H. 
Storlazzi, Ernest 0. 
Strong, Eldon H. 
Sweeney, Joseph C. 
Tacconi, Rino V. 
Temple, James A. 
Thompson, David M. 
Thompson, Lester M. 
Thorn, John H. 
Tibbetts, Lawrence A. 
Urquhart, William M. 
Valentine, William R. 
van Cleef, Henry H. 
Vannett, William B. 
Walsh, Arthur J. Sr. 
Walsh, Edward B. 
Walsh, William R. 
Webster, Dean K. 
Webster, Walter N. 
Wescott, Emery N. 
Westfall, Leslie D. 
White, Laurence F. 
Whitney, Chester F. Jr. 
Wilkinson, Marcia A. 
Wilton, Robert B. 
Winters, Claire J. 
Winters, John A. 
Witt, Francis J. 
Wojtkun, Janina B. 
Wormwood, Helen G. 
Wright, Jason C. 
Wright, Robert L. 
Zink, Alvin J. Jr. 
VanVleet, Frank R. 



Acct. Executive 

Secretary (Part-time) 

Executive Secretary 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Retired 

Homemaker 

Chief Draftsman 

Senior Project Engr. 

Electronics Lab. Super, 

System Planning Engr. 

Electrical Engineer 

Asst. Planning Manager 

Laborer 

Tax Specialist 

Stat. Steam Engineer 

School Cafeteria Mgr. 

Control Operator 

Claims Supervisor 

Housewife 

Electrician 

Insurance Adjuster 

Asst. Treas. & Mgr. 

Machinist 

Mech. Engineer 

Bank Manager 

Retired 

Thrift Shop Manager 

Cutting Foreman 

Electrical Engineer 

Cost Estimator 

School Bus Operator 

Unemployed 

Pres. -Merrimade, Inc. 

Retired 

Controller 

Salesman 

Elec. Design Engineer 

Senior Electronic Engr, 

Senior Engineer 

Receiving Clerk 

Foreman 

Senior Engineer 

Aircraft Maint. Instr. 

President-Feed Mfg. 

Semi-Retired 

Chemist 

Roll Builder 

Business Analyst 

Lineman 

At Home 

Insurance Broker 

Part-time Secretary 

Retired 

Electrical Engineer 

Homemaker 

Housewife 

Community Relations 

Standards Engineer 

Staff Engineer 

Chief Engineer 



144 Love joy Road 
63 Lucerne Drive 
21 Gould Road 

49 Cheever Circle 

40 Wildwood Road 

4 Stratford Road 

14 Strawberry Hill 
11 Arundel Street 
57 Love joy Road 

74 Princeton Ave. 

3 Midland Circle 
6 College Circle 

15 Ballardvale Road 

11 Amherst Road 

5 College Circle 

57 Tewksbury Street 

145 River Road 

25 Brechin Terrace 
117 Lowell Street 

15 Alderbrook Road 
19 Burnham Road 

18 Pasho Street 
38 Holt Road 

78 Lowell Street 

31 Chandler Circle 

6 Shepley Street 

12 Brechin Terrace 
85 Chandler Road 

7 Canterbury Street 

41 Linwood Street 

19 Cuba Street 

72 Tewksbury Street 

32 Bellevue Road 

65 Sunset Rock Road 

19 Chandler Circle 

111 North Main St. 

4 Glen Meadow Road 
3 Gray Road 

56 Woburn Street 
83 Maple Avenue 

6 Brechin Terrace 
80 Greenwood Road 

33 Rock Ridge Road 
37 Pasho Street 

13 Sunset Rock Road 

7 Carriage Hill Road 

16 Alderbrook Road 

41 Summer Street 

8 Apollo Circle 
268 High Plain Road 
Foster Pond 
Foster Pond 

42 Enmore Street 
47 Enmore Street 

20 Chatham Road 
19 Moraine Street 
11 Lowell Jet. Road 
13 Carisbrooke St. 
11 Gould Road 

21 Chester Street 

112 Dascomb Road 



59 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 6, 1972 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, January 24, 1972, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and 
assembled at the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five 
and Six, viz: The William A. Doherty School, Bartlet Street, in Precinct One; the 
Lower Hall, Andover Baptist Church, in Precinct Two; the Sacred Heart School, Bal- 
moral Street, in Precinct Three; the West Elementary School, Beacon Street, in Pre- 
cinct Four; the South Elementary School, Woburn Street, Ballardvale, in Precinct 
Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in Precinct Six, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF MARCH, 1972 

at 8:00 o'clock A. M. , to act upon the following articles: 

ESSEX, SS. March 6, 1972 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
places and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Thomas P. Eldred, Constable 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

ARTICLE 1. 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at eight o'clock A. M. 
and closed at seven o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 4,036, viz: 

Precinct 1 - 798 Precinct 2 - 345 Precinct 3 - 675 

Precinct 4 - 943 Precinct 5 - 331 Precinct 6 - 944 







PRECINCTS 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


623 


278 


541 


760 


259 


712 
1 


175 


67 


134 


183 


72 


231 



492 


206 


443 


659 


219 


744 


273 


120 


200 


239 


94 


171 


33 


19 


32 


45 


18 


29 



MODERATOR - FOR ONE YEAR 

Arthur Williams 3173 

James D. Doherty 1 

Blanks 862 

SELECTMAN - ONE FOR THREE YEARS 

Alan F. French 2763 

Theodore E. Meinelt, Jr. 1097 

Blanks 176 



60 







PRECINCTS 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


227 


82 


125 


265 


99 


256 


233 


135 


360 


254 


95 


148 


317 


113 


174 


398 


127 


517 


21 


15 


16 


26 


10 


23 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - ONE FOR THREE YEARS 

William J. Coderre 1054 

Stephen R. Duly 1225 

William L. Lane 1646 

Blanks 111 

QUESTION NO. 1 

491 259 433 577 199 492 YES 2451 

279 75 219 344 121 434 NO 1472 

28 11 23 22 11 18 Blanks 113 

QUESTION NO. 2 

188 136 154 207 83 211 YES 979 

571 189 481 697 235 691 NO 2864 

39 20 40 39 13 42 Blanks 193 

All the foregoing officers and questions were voted for on one ballot and the 
check lists were used. 

REPORT OF WARDEN -PRECINCT 1 March 2, 1972 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1800. Number of spoiled ballots 1. Number of 
unused ballots 1005. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1006. Number of ballots 
voted 794. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 794. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 
794. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of defective ballots hand-counted 0. 
Number of absentee ballots 4. Grand total for precinct 798. Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. 
Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty-Richard Caldwell. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 2 March 2, 1972 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1000. Number of spoiled ballots 5. Number of 
unused ballots 652. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 657. Number of ballots 
voted 343. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 343. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 
343. Number of write-in ballots 0. Number of defective ballots hand-counted 0. 
Number of ballots counted by computer 343. Number of absentee ballots 2. Grand 
total for precinct 345. Fernand J. Lussier, Warden. Police officer on duty, 
George W. Miller. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 3 March 2, 1972 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1800. Number of spoiled ballots 2. Number of 
unused ballots 1128. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1130. Number of ballots 
voted 670. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for computer 
count 670. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 
670. Number of absentee ballots 5. Grand total for precinct 675. A. Norman War- 
hurst, Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty, Joseph Hastings III. 

REPORT OF WARDEN -PRECINCT 4 M arch 2, 1972 

Number of votomatic ballots received 2500. Number of spoiled ballots 1. Number of 
unused ballots 1560. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1561. Number of ballots 
voted 936. Number of defective ballots 2. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total 
number of ballots for computer count 936. Number of ballots counted by computer 
936. Number of absentee ballots 5. Number of defective ballots-hand-counted 2. 
Grand total for Precinct 943. James D. Doherty, Precinct Warden. Police officer on 
duty, Joseph Becotte. 

61 



REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 5 March 2, 1972 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1000. Number of spoiled ballots 3. Number of 
unused ballots 669. Total number of spoiled and unused ballots 672. Number of bal- 
lots voted 328. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Total number of ballots for compu- 
ter count 328. Number of defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by compu- 
ter 328. Number of absentee ballots 3. Grand total for Precinct 331. Irving 0. 
Piper, Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty, David L. Carney. 

REPORT OF WARDEN-PRECINCT 6 March 2, 1972 

Number of votomatic ballots received 2500. Number of spoiled ballots 1. Number of 
unused ballots 1561. Total number of spoiled and unused ballots 1562. Number of 
ballots voted 938. Total number of ballots for computer count 938. Number of de- 
fective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 938. Number of ballots 
(write-ins) 1. Number of absentee ballots 6. Grand total for Precinct 944. 
Chester A. MacMillan, Precinct Warden. Police officer on duty, Russell H. Berthel. 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by virtue of 
Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Monday, March 20, 1972 at 7:30 o'clock 
P. M. at the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 20, 1972 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 887 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:40 P. M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Father Kenneth J. Kennedy, Pastor of St. Augus- 
tine's Church. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman George E. Heseltine. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit forty-one non-voters to the meeting and also 
a group of Cub Scouts. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the Auditorium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to dispense with the reading of 
the Warrant and the return of service of the constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator refer to the 
articles by number and by subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years, one 
member of the School Committee for three years and any other town officers required 
by law to be elected by ballot, also to vote on the following questions: 

QUESTION NO. 1 — "Shall licenses be granted in this town for the operation, 

holding or conducting a game commonly called beano?" 

QUESTION NO. 2 — "Shall the Town, in addition to the payment of fifty per 

cent of a premium for contributory group life and health 
insurance for employees in the service of the town and 
their dependents, pay a subsidiary or additional rate?" 



62 



All the above candidates and questions to be voted for on one ballot. The polls 
will be open from 8:00 o'clock A. M. to 7:00 o'clock P. M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of the election and questions on March 6, 
1972 and declared Arthur Williams elected as Moderator and that he had previously 
been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that office. 

The Town Clerk also declared the other successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices and that they had been sworn to the faithful performance of the 
duties of their offices. 

Alan F. French Selectman for Three Years 

William L. Lane School Committee for Three Years 

QUESTION NO. 1 The Vote YES 2451 NO 1472 

QUESTION NO. 2 The Vote YES 979 NO 2864 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by 
ballot. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that John M. Murray be elected Trustee of 
the Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected TOWN OFFICERS for the ensuing 
year. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the salaries of the elected TOWN 
OFFICERS be established as follows for the ensuing year: (each item being voted on 
separately) : 

Moderator $ 25.00 for each town meeting 

Selectmen 

Chairman $1,000.00 per year 

Members $ 800.00 per year 

ARTICLE 4. To determine what sums of money shall be appropriated for the 1972 
Town Budget as submitted by the Town Manager and reviewed by the Finance Committee 
in its report. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and appropriate the following 
sums of money: 

Town Moderator Personal Services $ 75.00 

Board of Selectmen Personal Services 4,800.00 

Other Expenses (incl. $300 2,850.00 

for out-of-state travel ) 

Town Manager Personal Services 36,985.00 

Other Expenses (incl. $700 5,125.00 

for out-of-state travel) 

Elections and Registrations Personal Services 16,914.00 

Other Expenses 11,530.00 

Finance Committee Other Expenses 5,000.00 

Town Accountant Personal Services 34,569.00 

Other Expenses (incl. $100 17,025.00 

for out-of-state travel) 

63 



Town Treasurer 
Tax Collector 

Board of Assessors 

Town Counsel 
Town Clerk 

Planning Board 
Municipal Buildings 

Conservation Commission 

Industrial and Development 
Commission 

Central Services 
Board of Appeals 
Council on Aging 
Police Department 

Fire Department 

Civil Defense 

Animal Control 
Electrical Inspection 
Weights and Measures 
Building Inspection 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $150 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $800 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $600 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $800 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $800 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $100 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $100 

for out-of-state travel) 



$ 20,598.00 
3,750.00 

30,272.00 
3,490.00 



38,321.00 
12,985.00 



6,300.00 
10,000.00 

17,787.00 
3,215.00 



7,673.00 
5,350.00 

8,213.00 
25,000.00 

2,575.00 

450.00 



6,649.00 
18,000.00 

2,645.00 
900.00 

1,752.00 
6,750.00 

568,087.00 
73,025.00 



606,457.00 
39,700.00 



1,000.00 
2,600.00 



8,075.00 
4,400.00 

6,670.00 
825.00 

2,400.00 
688.00 

19,043.00 
3,290.00 



64 



Public Works 



General Administration 
Highways 

Parks 

Forestry 

Vehicle Maintenance 

Street Lighting 
Engineering 

Sewers 

Landfill Operation 

Garbage Contract 



Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $60 for 

out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



$ 37,992.00 

197,167.00 
293,900.00 

55,577.00 
13,000.00 

54,819.00 
20,685.00 



28,003.00 
85,600.00 

75,000.00 

37,019.00 
1,740.00 

28,561.00 
17,050.00 

27,734.00 
187,750.00 

50,000.00 



Public Health 
Board of Health 

Animal Inspection 
Veterans' Services 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 
Assistance 



33,081.00 
3,495.00 

600.00 

16,866.00 

1,025.00 

48,581.00 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was VOTED to ad- 
journ at 10:50 P. M. until Monday evening, March 27, 1972 at the Memorial Auditorium 
at 7:30 P. M. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 27, 1972 



The check lists were used at entrance and showed 861 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:35 P. M. 
having been adjourned from Monday, March 20, 1972 at 10:50 P. M. 

The Moderator declared that the first item of business would be Article 4-Item 70 
(School Department). 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit sixteen non-voters. 



65 



ARTICLE 4-cont, 



Andover School Department 

Regional Vocational School 
Library 



Recreation Department 
Water Department 
Spring Grove Cemetery 

Insurance 

Employee Benefits 

Patriotic and Civic Celebrations 

Veterans' Headquarters Rental 

Retirement 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $6,500 

for out-of-state travel) 



Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $550 

for out-of-state travel 

less $2,302 for dog license 

reimbursements) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $400 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses (Incl. $1,000 

for out-of-state travel) 

Personal Services 
($36,600 less investment 
income-$10,000) 
Other Expenses 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



Pension Fund 

Non-Contributory Pensions 

Damage to Persons and Property 

Interest Expense 

Bond Issue Expense 

Bond Issue Redemptions 

Equipment Outlay 

Compensation Plan 

Total BUDGET to be raised by taxation 



5,718,018.00 
1,363,083.00 



113,765.52 

218,762.00 
99,542.00 



52,314.00 
24,180.00 



151,815.00 
119,450.00 



26,600.00 



15,900, 

103,100, 

50,000, 

5,525. 

2,880, 

4,423, 
425. 

228,213. 

27,847, 

3,000. 

750,420. 

2,000. 

1,430,000. 

5,000. 

100,000. 



00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 
00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 



$13,635,315.52 



SPECIAL ARTICLES ( FROM TAXATION ) 

ARTICLE 6 Chapter 90 Highway Construction 

ARTICLE 8 Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 

ARTICLE 9 MBTA Contract 



62,000.00 
2,971.25 
2,500.00 



66 



SPECIAL ARTICLES (FROM TAXATION) - cont. 

ARTICLE 15 Install Road Drains $100,000.00 

ARTICLE 37 Acquire Land-Municipal purposes 50,000.00 

Library area 

ARTICLE 47 Preliminary Plans for renovations of) 60,000.00 

Doherty and Shawsheen Schools ) 

ARTICLE 48 Unpaid bills from prior years 801 .01 

Total SPECIAL ARTICLES to be raised by taxation $278,272.26 

SPECIAL ARTICLES ( FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS) 

ARTICLE 21 Update Master Plan-Water Distribution System $ 26,000.00 

ARTICLE 22 Install water mains-Abbot Street and ) 30,000.00 

Red Spring Road ) 

ARTICLE 31 Conservation Commission (transfer from ) 7,500.00 

amount received from State Self-Help ) 
Fund--re Strazzulla property) ) 

ARTICLE 32 Conservation Commission (purchase land ) 7,850.00 

off Juniper Road 15.7 acres, more or ) 
less, supposed to be owned by Fred Doyle) 

ARTICLE 33 Conservation Commission (purchase land-River) 3,000.00 

Street and Shawsheen River) ) 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ARTICLE 1 Install Water and Sewer Mains along ) 23,000.00 

Connector Road ) 

Total SPECIAL ARTICLES from available funds $ 97,350.00 

Grand Total Budget and Special Articles $14,010,937.78 



ARTICLE 7 Overlay Reserve to Reserve Fund $ 60,000.00 

ARTICLE 50 Free Cash to reduce 1972 Tax Rate $ 500,000.00 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Town Manager and the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of 
the revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 1972 and January 1, 1973, 
in accordance with provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or take any other ac- 
tion relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to accept Article 5 as 
printed in the Warrant. 



67 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $80,000 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, the Town to be reimbursed 50% 
by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County; and to authorize the Town to acquire 
necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 6 and raise by taxa- 
tion the sum of $62,000 for Chapter 90 Highway Construction, the Town to be reim- 
bursed 50% by the Commonwealth and 25% by the County; and to authorize the Town to 
acquire necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right 
of eminent domain. 

The Vote — YES 670, NO 2 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $60,000 from Overlay Reserve 
to the Reserve Fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer $60,000 from 
Overlay Reserve to the Reserve Fund. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $2,971.25 to meet the Town's share of the cost of the Greater Lawrence Sani- 
tary District for the year 1972 as determined by Chapter 750 of the 1968 Acts of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 8 be approved as printed in 
the warrant in the amount of $2,971.25 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $2,500 and to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a one year contract 
with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and to use said sum or any part 
thereof to defray deficits of the railroad resulting from providing commuter ser- 
vice from Andover to Boston. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $2,500 by taxation. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of the General 
Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 20, regarding reconsideration of a variance or special 
permit after unfavorable action by the Board of Appeals. 

Inserted at request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 10 as printed in the 
warrant. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of the General 
Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 8, regarding reconsideration of a proposed change in a 
zoning by-law after unfavorable action. 

Inserted at request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 11 as printed in the 
warrant. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning District by chang- 
ing from Industrial A to Single Residence C, Lots 29 and 29A as shown on Assessors' 
Map 128. 

Inserted at request of the Planning Board. 

Article 12 was withdrawn. 



68 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, Article VIII 
by changing the present paragraph 7 to 7A and by adding a new paragraph 7B to Sec- 
tion IV B, Table of Use Regulations, as follows: 

Animal hospitals in conjunction with at least one owner--veterinarian living on 
the premises, provided that: (1) there is a minimum lot size of ten (10) acres; 
2) there shall be at least five hundred (500) feet of frontage on an approved road; 
3 ) there shall be a minimum front yard depth of sixty (60) feet and a minimum side 
and rear depths of one hundred (100) feet; 4) under normal conditions no objection- 
able noise or odors shall be perceptible at property lines; 5) subject also to pro- 
visions of Section VI A 7 and VI H; and showing the symbol SP for Special Permit in 
the column under SRB and N for No under all other categories. 

and to add to Section VI A, Parking Requirements, a new Section 7 as follows: 

7. Residence Districts 

(a) For Animal Hospital, six (6) off-street parking spaces for each 
doctor with a minimum of ten (10) spaces. 

and to add to Section VI, Other Requirements, a new subsection H as follows: 

H. Animal Hospitals 

In granting a special permit for animal hospitals, the Board of Appeals 
shall be satisfied that the conditions set forth in Section VIII B.2 as 
well as the following conditions are met: 

1. All wards for housing of animals shall be in inside rooms with no 
outside walls. 

2. All exercise areas shall be completely roofed and enclosed with 
concrete block walls or its equivalent. 

3. The entire building shall be heated, ventilated, and air-conditioned 
to eliminate as much sound as possible. 

4. The building shall be designed to conform to the residential character 
of the surrounding neighborhood. 

5. Landscaping shall include adequate screening of parking areas. 

On petition of Richard D. Lindsay and others. 

Article 13 was defeated. The Vote — YES 321, NO 210 — less than the two-thirds vote 
required. A favorable report of the Planning Board was read on this article by 
David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to authorize and direct the 
Selectmen to petition the Legislature to enact a bill to have the Town of Andover 
pay retro-active money during the period between August 15, 1971 and November 15, 
1971, provided the I. R. S. approves the request, on petition of Andover Police 
Betterment Committee and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 14 as printed in the 
warrant. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, 
transfer from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing, the sum of 
$100,000 for the purpose of installing road drains and authorize the Selectmen to 
acquire the necessary easements by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 15 as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $100,000 by taxation. The Vote — YES 333, NO 32 — voted by 
more than 2/3 as required. 

69 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn 
at 11:08 P. M. until Monday, April 3, 1972 in the Memorial Auditorium at 7:30 P. M. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 3, 1972 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 667 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:35 P. M. having 
been adjourned from Monday, March 27, 1972 at 11:08 P. M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit twelve non-voters. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Timothy Drive as approved by the Planning Board, as shown in part on plan entitled 
"Subdivision and Acceptance Plan Porter Field, Karl Killorin, April 22, 1959, Scale 
l"=40 t , Spaulding E. Owen P. E." said plan being recorded in the North District of 
Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #3790 and as shown in part on plan entitled "Sub- 
division and Acceptance Plan, Porterfield, Karl Killorin, July 30, 1965, Scale 1"= 
40', Fred R. Joyce, Engineer", said plan being recorded in the North District of 
Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #5444, said plan and description for recording pur- 
poses being on file with the Town Clerk, on petition of Karl C. Killorin and others. 

Upon motion duly seco nded, it was VOTED to accept as a public way and name Timothy 
Drive, including recorded easements, as approved by the Planning Board, as shown in 
part on plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan Porter Field, Karl Killorin, 
April 22, 1959, Scale 1"=40', Spaulding E. Owen, P. E." said plan being recorded in 
the North District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #3790 and as shown in part on 
plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, Porterfield, Karl Killorin, 
July 30, 1965, Scale 1"=40', Fred R. Joyce, Engineer", said plan being recorded in 
the North District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #5444, said plan and descrip- 
tion for recording purposes being on file with the Town Clerk. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way an additional 
portion of Wild Rose Drive, south from the intersection of Hickory Lane and west to 
the seco nd intersection with Hemlock Road as shown on a plan which has been ap- 
proved by the Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Sub- 
division Plan of Rolling Green", Andover, Mass. by Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Prof. 
Engineer; Section 3, sheet 1 and Section 4, sheet 1 as recorded on Plan No. 4467 in 
the North Essex Registry of Deeds, on petition of Sherwood Homes, Inc. and others, 
subject to approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 17 was defeated. The Vote — YES 82, NO 324. 

ARTICLE 18, To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way Poplar Terrace 
as shown on a plan which has been approved by the Andover Planning Board, said way 
being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Rolling Green", Andover, Mass., 
by Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Prof. Engineer; Section 2, sheet 1 and Section 3, sheet 
2 as recorded on Plan No. 4467 in the North Essex Registry of Deeds, on petition of 
Sherwood Homes, Inc. , and other s, subject to approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 18 as printed in the 
warrant. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public way Hemlock Road as 
shown on a plan which has been approved by the Andover Planning Board, said way 
being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Rolling Green", Andover, Mass., 
by Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Prof. Engineer; Section 3, sheet 2, Section 4, sheet 1 
and Section R as recorded on Plan No. 4467 in the North Essex Registry of Deeds, on 
petition of Sherwood Homes, Inc. and others, subject to approval by the Board of 
Selectmen. 



70 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept as a public way Hemlock Road, 
without thereby accepting any drainage easements, as shown on a plan which has been 
approved by the Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled 
"Subdivision Plan of Rolling Green", Andover, Mass., by Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. 
Prof. Engineer; Section 3, sheet 2, Section 4, sheet 1 and Section R as recorded on 
Plan 4467 in the North Essex Registry of Deeds. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way Sweetbriar 
Lane as shown on a plan which has been approved by the Andover Planning Board, said 
way being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Rolling Green", Andover, 
Mass., by Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Prof. Engineer; Section 2, sheet 1 and Section 3, 
sheet 2 as recorded on Plan No. 4467 in the North Essex Registry of Deeds, on peti- 
tion of Sherwood Homes, Inc. and others, subject to approval by the Board of Select- 
men. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Article 20 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $26,000 for the purpose of updating the 
Master Plan for the Water Distribution System. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 21 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $26,000 from available funds. 

The Vote~YES 277, NO 239. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $100,000 for 
the purpose of installing water mains, 8 inch in size in Abbot Street and Red Spring 
Road to eliminate dead end lines and 24 inch in size in Osgood Street and to deter- 
mine whether the same shall be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds 
or by any combination of the foregoing, or to take any other action. Betterments 
to be assessed. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town appropriate $30,000 for the 
purpose of installing water mains, 8 inches in size, in Abbot Street and Red Spring 
Road; and, to meet this appropriation, the following sums remaining as surplus 
after completion of projects be transferred to this item: 

$18,915.80 — Article 14, Warrant of March 1966 

944.78 — Article 4, Warrant of August 1967 

2,839.24 — Article 32, Warrant of March 1968 

5,282.36 — Article 2, Warrant of October 1969 

2,017.82 — Article 25, Warrant of March 1970 

$30,000.00 

and that betterments be assessed. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $35,000 for 
the purpose of installing a water main not less than 8 inches and not more than 
12 inches in Salem Street from Wethersfield Drive to Wagon Wheel Road and in Wagon 
Wheel Road, and to determine whether the same shall be raised by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing, 
or to take any other action. This installation follows the master plan as adjusted 
to current and future needs. Betterments are to be assessed. On petition of Ann- 
Marie C. Schmidt and others. 

Article 23 was defeated. 

At 9:05 P. M. , on motion made by Town Counsel Fredric S. O'Brien and duly sec- 
onded, it was VOTED to adjourn the regular town meeting to act on Article 1 of the 
Special Town Meeting and reconvene after action on the Special Town Meeting war- 
rant. 



71 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 3, 1972 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds $23,000 for the purpose of installing water and sewer 
mains along the Connector Road, so-called, and in private property adjacent thereto 
beginning at Lowell Junction Road and extending for a distance of approximately 600 
feet and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by purchase, 
by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain over land supposed to be owned by 
Nicholas H. Fitzgerald and, further, that betterments be assessed. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town appropriate $23,000 for the 
purpose of installing water and sewer mains along the Connector Road, so-called, 
and in private property adjacent thereto beginning at Lowell Junction Road and ex- 
tending for a distance of approximately 600 feet and to meet this appropriation, 
transfer the sum of $23,000 from the unexpended balance in the appropriation made 
at the 1971 annual Town Meeting under Article 40 for the installation of a Sanitary 
Sewer in Central Street and Lupine Road and, further, to authorize the Selectmen to 
accept the necessary easements by gift over land supposed to be owned by Nicholas H. 
Fitzgerald and that betterments be assessed. 

The Vote — YES 502, NO 28 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

A favorable report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman. 

The Andover Finance Committee unanimously approved this article. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was VOTED at 9:22 PM 
to adjourn the Special Town Meeting and revert to the annual Town Meeting warrant. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 4, 1972 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to receive the report of the Committee 
appointed by the Moderator at the March 8, 1971 Town Meeting concerning Representa- 
tive Town Government and to take such action thereon as may be appropriate. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to have the Committee continue and come 
back to the October Town Meeting with recommendations and articles regarding the 
open town meeting. 

It was further voted to receive the report of the Committee. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $4,000 for the purpose of implementing 
proposed changes to improve town meeting communications systems and stage properties. 

Inserted at the request of the Committee to Study Town Meeting Procedures. 

Article 25 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to strike out Article II: TOWN MEETINGS: 
VOTING; Section 1 through 7, of the existing General Bylaws of the Town in its en- 
tirety and enact the following Bylaws designated as Article II: TOWN MEETINGS: 
ELECTION OF OFFICERS AND TRANSACTION OF MUNICIPAL BUSINESS, Section 1 through 16 in 
its place. 

ARTICLE II: TOWN MEETINGS: ELECTION OF OFFICERS AND TRANSACTION OF MUNICIPAL 
BUSINESS 

Section 1 Annual Town Meeting : The Annual Town Meeting for the election of 
town officers and for other purposes shall be held on the first 

72 



Monday of March in each year at such place or places within the 
Town as the Selectmen may designate in their notice thereof. 

Section 2 Special Town Meeting : 

A. Special Town Meetings may be held at such times and at such 
places as the Selectmen may designate, or upon the request, in 
writing, of 200 registered voters. 

B. A Special Town Meeting shall be held each year on the first 
Monday of October. 

C. Any article in the Warrant for a Special Town Meeting which 
proposes the appropriation of funds shall be considered and 
acted upon by such Special Town Meeting only if the article is 
approved by the Finance Committee. 

Section 3 Warrant : Every town meeting shall meet at the time and place 
fixed in the warrant and shall be called to order by the 
Moderator. The warrants for all town meetings shall be directed 
to either of the Constables of the Town, and notice of all meet- 
ings shall be given by posting attested copies of the warrant on 
the Town Hall, and on such other public places as the Selectmen 
may designate, and by publication in at least one newspaper of 
general circulation within the Town, seven days at least before 
the day of the meeting. 

Section 4 Quorum: Except as to such parts of the Annual Town Meeting as 
are devoted exclusively to the election of town officers, 350 
registered voters of the Town shall be necessary to constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business at any Annual or 
Special Town Meeting; but less than a quorum may vote to adjourn 
indefinitely or to adjourn from time to time, and any business 
which might have been transacted at the meeting originally 
called may be transacted at an adjourned meeting. 

Section 5 Annual Town Report : The Town Manager shall annually, at least 
seven days before the date fixed for the Annual Meeting, cause 
to be made available to the registered voters of the Town an 
Annual Report, which shall contain a detailed report of all 
monies received into and paid out of the town treasury during 
the preceding fiscal year, which report shall be examined and 
approved by the Accountant before it is printed. He shall 
also publish in said report such information and recommenda- 
tions relating to town finances as he or the Board of Selectmen 
may deem proper. Reports of the Treasurer and Collector, and 
reports of such other town officers, boards, committees and 
departments as may be directed by the Town Manager or by the 
Board of Selectmen shall be included in the Annual Report. 

Section 6 Adjournment : Any town meeting may be adjourned from time to 
time and to any place within the Town. 

Section 7 Admission of other than Registered Voters: 

A. General Public : Persons who are not registered voters of 
the Town may request admission to any Annual or Special Town 
Meeting by submitting their names and addresses (or that of 
the person in charge, if the Moderator deems an interested 
group too large for such enumeration) to the Moderator who 
shall read such names to the meeting. Such persons shall be 
admitted to the meeting if the majority vote of those present, 
the meeting approves their admission. The Moderator shall 
set apart a space of reasonable size within the place of assem- 
bly where all such persons shall sit. 



73 



B. Representatives of the Press: At any town meeting the 
Moderator shall set apart a space of reasonable size within 
the place of assembly and shall admit thereto such persons 
as have demonstrated to his satisfaction are accredited 
representatives of the press, wh ether or not they be regis- 
tered voters of the Town. 

MODERATOR-RULES OF DEBATE 

Section 8 Moderator : The Moderator shall preserve order and decorum. 

Section 9 Addressing Town Meeting : No person shall address a town meeting 
without leave of the Moderator, and all persons shall, at the 
request of the Moderator, be silent. If a person, after warn- 
ing from the Moderator, persists in disorderly behavior, the 
Moderator may order him to withdraw from the meeting, and if he 
does not withdraw, may order a constable or any other person to 
remove him and confine him in some convenient place until the 
meeting is adjourned. 

Section 10 Recognition by the Moderator: Upon recognition by the Moderator, 
the speaker shall first state his name and place of residence be- 
fore addressing the meeting. 

Section 11 Privileged Motions: No person while speaking shall be interrup- 
ted by another, except to call a: 

a.) point of order: a question to determine the legality of a 
motion. 

b.) point of information: a question to clarify information 
pertinent to the motion at hand. 

c.) point of no quorum: a question to determine the absence 
of a quorum. 

d.) question of privilege: a question to determine and assure 
the meeting of the dignity, safety, and integrity of its pro- 
ceedings and of the voters . 

e.) fix the time at which to adjourn: a motion that states 
the time of adjournment. 

f.) adjourn to a fixed time or recess: a motion that suspends 
the meeting temporarily until another time. 

MOTIONS AND ORDER OF BUSINESS 

Section 12 Order of business: All articles in the warrant shall be taken 
up in their order upon the warrant unless otherwise ordered by 
a 4/5 vote of the meeting, and no motion or resolution, the 
subject matter of which is not set forth in some article in 
the warrant, shall be entertained. 

Section 13 Dissolution of the meeting: No motion to dissolve the meeting 
shall be in order until every article in the warrant has been 
duly considered and acted upon, but this shall not preclude an 
adjournment of the meeting to some other date. 

Section 14 Majority Vote : Unless otherwise provided by law or bylaw, all 
motions shall require only a majority vote. 



74 



VOTING 

Section 15 Declaring the Vote: When only a majority vote is required the 
sense of the meeting shall be determined by a voice vote, and 
the Moderator shall declare the vote as it sounds to him. If 
the Moderator is unable to decide the vote by the sound of the 
voices, or if his decision is immediately questioned by seven 
or more voters standing in their place for that purpose, the 
Moderator shall, without debate, determine the vote by ordering 
a standing vote. 

Section 16 Vote by Ballot : After a motion on an article in the Town Warrant 
has been made and seconded (but in no event after a final vote 
has been taken on such motion) , a motion that the article be 
voted on by secret ballot shall be in order. Motions for a 
secret ballot, if seconded, shall be put to a standing vote; and, 
if such motion is approved by twenty-five percent (25%) or more 
of those so voting, ballots approved by the Moderator as to form 
shall be used in voting upon the particular article. A reason- 
able number of ballots for the above purpose shall be in the 
possession of the Moderator prior to the call to order of any 
Annual or Special Town Meeting. 

On petition of Pamela H. Mitchell and others. 

Article 26 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II, Section 3 of its 
By-Laws to establish a quorum for Town Meetings at 5% of the registered voters so 
that said Section 3 will read as follows: 

Section 3. Quorum : Except as to such parts of the Annual Town Meeting as are 
devoted exclusively to the election of town officers, 5% of the 
registered voters of the town as of January 1 of the year in which 
the Town Meeting is held shall be necessary to constitute a quorum 
for the transaction of business at any Annual or Special Town Meet- 
ing; but less than a quorum may vote to adjourn indefinitely or to 
adjourn from time to time, and any business which might have been 
transacted at the meeting originally called may be transacted at an 
adjourned meeting. 

Article 27 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $25,000 for the construction of a sewer 
main in Dufton Road and the extension of Dufton Road and connecting to the existing 
Town sewer in Haverhill St. for a distance of $00 feet more or less; said construc- 
tion to be done under the betterment act; and to authorize the Town to acquire 
easements by release, by purchase or by right of eminent domain across the follow- 
ing land supposed to be owned by the following: 

Lot 104-E of Assessors' Map 19, Plaza Trust, John D. MacDonald, 
Arthur A. Collins and Henry D. Audesse, Trustees 

or take any other action relative thereto, on petition of Henry W. Pepin and others, 

Article 28 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence "A" to 
General Business District the following parcel of real estate: 

A certain parcel of land, with all the buildings thereon, situated in said 
Andover on the easterly side of Central Street, bounded and described as 
follows: 



75 



Beginning at the southwesterly corner of the premises at said street; 
thence southeasterly by land now or formerly of Eaton about 126 feet, 
3 inches to land now or formerly of George F. Swift; thence north 36° 
East by said Swift land 83 feet, 2 inches to the center of Rogers Brook, 
so-called; thence north 77-1/4° West 135 feet, 4 inches to said Central 
Street; and thence south 36° West by said street 62^ feet to the corner 
and bound first named. 

Meaning and intending to rezone Lot 83 on Assessors' Map 55. 

On petition of Thomas W. Tavenner and others. 

Article 29 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence "A" to 
General Business District the following parcels of real estate: 

Lots 83, 84, 85, 86 and 87 on Assessors' Map 55. 

On petition of Thomas W. Tavenner and others. 

Article 30 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds the 
sum of $7,500 to the Conservation Fund, this being the equivalent to the amount 
received from the State Self-Help fund in reimbursement of a portion of the purchase 
price of the former Strazzulla property, no money to be spent without the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen. 

Inserted at request of Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 31 as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $7,500 from available funds. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commission 
to purchase for conservation purposes under General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C as 
amended or as hereafter further amended, the fee or any lesser interest, in all or 
part of Lot 34 of Assessors' Map 131, supposed to be owned by Fred Doyle, said lot 
being located off Juniper Road and consisting of 15.7 acres of land more or less, 
said purchase to be made from the Conservation Fund and the purchase price to be 
computed at the rate of $500 per acre. 

Inserted at request of Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 32 as printed in the 
warrant . 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commission 
to expend from the Conservation Fund the sum of $3,000 for the purchase for conser- 
vation purposes under General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8c, as amended or as here- 
after further amended the fee in the following lots on River Street and the Shaw- 
sheen River, supposed to be owned by Theodore A. Mikulewicz, and totaling approxi- 
mately l| acres: Lots 37, 40, 42 and 49 of Assessors' Map 140. 

Inserted at request of Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 33 as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $3,000 from the Conservation Fund. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to petition the Legislature for a Special Act to exempt the position of 
Director of Public Works from the provisions of General Laws, c. 31 (Civil Service). 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 34 as printed in the 
warrant . 

76 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to petition the Legislature for a Special Act to exempt from the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 31 (Civil Service), the position of Water and Sewer Super- 
intendent or any other superintendent of the water distribution system, water supply 
and pumping facilities, Water Treatment Plant, sewerage system, sewage pumping and 
treatment facilities, or a superintendent in charge of any combination of the fore- 
going positions. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 35 as printed in the 
warrant. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to petition the Legislature for a Special Act to exempt the position of 
Superintendent of Highways and Forestry from the provisions of General Laws, c. 31 
(Civil Service) , which act would become effective after the termination of employ- 
ment of the present persons holding those positions. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 36 as printed in the 
warrant . 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire 
for the Town, by purchase, by gift, by seizure or by right of eminent domain, for 
access to a municipal building or buildings, or for other municipal purposes, a 
fee in lots, or portions of lots, numbered 69, 71, as shown on Assessors' Map No. 55 
owned as follows: 

Lot 69 - Danton Realty Trust 

Lot 71 - Cyr Oil Co. 

and to appropriate by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by tax levy or 
by any combination of the foregoing, the sum of $50,000 or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 37 be approved as printed in 
the warrant in the amount of $50,000 by taxation, and that spending of said sum must 
have a majority approval of the Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was VOTED to ad- 
journ at 10:55 P. M. until Monday evening, April 10, 1972 at 7:30 P. M. in the Memo- 
rial Auditorium. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 10, ^1972 



The check lists were used at entrance and showed 955 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:35 P. M. , 
having been adjourned from Monday, April 3, 1972 at 10:55 P. M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit six non-voters, one of whom might wish to 
address the meeting. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to amend the Town By-Laws as 
adopted in 1966 and as amended from time to time, by adding the following new sec- 
tion to Article XII of the aforesaid by-laws: 



77 



Section 11. The use of chlorides within the town limits for the control 
of snow and ice on both public and private parking areas and roadways is 
prohibited. On petition of Richard J. Bowen and others. 

Article 38 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 7, second sentence of 
the Town By-Laws to bring it into conformity with the State hunting laws. The 
amendment would read as follows: In no event shall a hunter discharge a gun within 
500 feet of a dwelling, which is customarily occupied by persons for any use. 

On petition of Thomas W. Sutton, Jr. and others. 

Article 39 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to close its boundaries to Hunting, on 
petition of Patricia W. Thornton and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to approve Article 40 as printed in the 
warrant. The VOTE — YES 594, NO 230. 

(This article was not approved by the Attorney General) 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to prohibit all types of hunting on all 
properties owned by the Town of Andover, on petition of Donald T. Coleman and others. 

Article 41 was not acted upon. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the vote taken under Article 
24 of the Warrant for the adjourned Town Meeting held 20 March 1971 and transfer the 
unexpended balance of funds appropriated for the purpose of improving the drainage 
at the landfill operation off Chandler Road to surplus revenue, on petition of 
Irving L. Newman and others. 

Article 42 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws by inserting the 
following as Article IV, Section 6: 

No funds shall be appropriated for the construction of any structure, building, 
facility, or any project of any nature which requires architectural and/or 
engineering planning and design until and unless there is compliance with the 
following three phases in the entire construction cycle: 

1. The voters at Town Meeting may approve planning funds for the first phase- 
schematic design, sketches and design development, including probably construc- 
tion costs; 

2. The voters at Town meeting may, if the work under the first phase is com- 
pleted and approved by the cognizant Town officials, vote to determine if funds 
shall be appropriated to engage an architect and /or engineer for the second 
phase the preparation of working drawings, specifications, other essential 
documents and bidding information; 

3. The voters at Town Meeting may, if the work under the second phase is com- 
pleted and approved by the cognizant Town officials, vote to determine if 
funds shall be appropriated to construct the facility, building, structure or 
project. 

Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions, the voters at Town Meeting may ap- 
propriate funds to construct any facility, building, structure or project 
without first appropriating funds for either or both of the foregoing first 
and second phases, provided that the voters declare that an emergency exists 
on a vote which is not less than two-thirds (2^3) of the voters, and provided 
further that a valid justification be established for such action. 

78 



Construction shall include, but not exclusively, alterations, modifications, 
additions or repairs to existing buildings, structures, facilities or projects. 

On petition of Irving L. Newman and others. 

Article 43 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the by-laws by inserting the 
following as Article II, Section 4 (b) : 

Quarterly Report 

The Town Manager shall make a status and progress report to the Board of Select- 
men every three months of each and all warrant articles which have been approved 
at a Town Meeting until the terms and conditions of each article have been satis- 
fied, completed or consummated. A copy of the report shall be filed in the office 
of the Town Clerk as a public record. 

On petition of Irving L. Newman and others. 

Article 44 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning By-Law and Zoning 
Map by changing from an SRA or Single Residence District to an OP or Office Park 
District the following described parcel of land: 

Beginning at a point at the centerline of High Street, said point being on 
the Andover-Lawrence lines; 

Thence, running Southwesterly along the centerline of High Street, 900 feet, 
more or less, to the common intersection of High Street and Haverhill Street; 

Thence, turning and running Southerly along the centerline of said Haverhill 
Street 410 feet, more or less, to a point; 

Thence, turning and running Northwesterly through vacant land of Champy Con- 
struction Company, Inc., 920 feet, more or less, to an angle point in the 
existing industrially zoned boundary line; 

Thence, turning and running Northeasterly along said industrially zoned 
boundary line through open land of Champy Construction Company, Inc., and 
through land of John B. and Geraldine M. Patti, 850 feet more or less to 
the point of beginning. 

On petition of Matthew Cushing, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town amend its Zoning By-Law and 
and Zoning maps by changing from a SRA (Single Residence District) to an OP (Office 
Park District) the following described parcel of land: 

Beginning at a point at the center line of High Street, said point being on the 
Andover-Lawrence line, running Southwesterly along the center line of High Street, 
900 feet, more or less, to a common intersection of High Street and Haverhill 
Street; 

Thence turning and running Westerly along the center line of said Haverhill Street 
410 feet, more or less, to a point; 

Thence turning and running Northwesterly through vacant land of Champy Construc- 
tion Company, Inc., 920 feet, more or less to an angle point in the existing 
industrially-zoned boundary line; 



79 



Thence turning and running Northeasterly along said industrially-zoned boundary 
line through open land of Champy Construction Company, Inc. and through land of 
John B. and Geraldine Patti, 850 feet, more or less to the point of beginning. 

The Vote — YES 676, NO 127 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. A report of the 
Andover Planning Board was read by Harold King, Chairman. A quorum was present. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was voted at 
11:10 P. M. to adjourn until Thursday, April 20, 1972 in the Memorial Auditorium at 
7:30 P. M. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 20, 1972 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 468 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator, at 7:45 P. M. 
having been adjourned from Monday, April 10, 1972 at 11:10 P. M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit six non-voters. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to adopt the following decla- 
ration or take any other action relating thereto: 

We declare that the Town of Andover in the exercise of its corporate powers as 
granted by the constitution, the general and special laws of the Commonwealth, 
in the execution of its by-laws, and in the administration of its governmental 
affairs shall seek to give full force and effect to the following statements 
of policy: 

1. The legal right of every person employed within the town of Andover to 
live where he chooses shall carry with it the ability to live in the community 
of his choice. 

2. The Town of Andover in actively seeking to attract business and industry 
to locate within the town will encourage only those firms which demonstrate 
by positive action policies of active involvement in assuring that their em- 
ployees who desire to live in Andover are afforded the opportunity to do so. 

3. That those inhabitants of the Town of Andover who have lived their adult 
years in the community, who have reached retirement, and who wish to continue 
to live in Andover shall be able to enjoy this right without major sacrifice 
including the abandonment of life-long homesteads. 

On petition of Richard J. Bowen and others. 

Article 46 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from avail- 
able funds and appropriate $60,000 for the purpose of retaining the services of an 
architect or architects to prepare preliminary plans, working drawings, and bid 
specifications for renovations of the Doherty and Shawsheen Schools. 

Inserted at request of School Committee. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise by taxation and appropriate 
$60,000 under Article 47 as printed in the warrant. 



80 



ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds a sum not to exceed $2,000.00 to pay unpaid bills for 
which obligation was incurred in 1971 • 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town raise and appropriate by 
taxation the sum of $801.01 to pay the following bills from prior years. 



West Andover Community Assn. 
West Andover Community Assn. 
Able Electrical Contractors 
Andover Plumbing & Heating Co. 
J. J. Cronin Company 
Matthew Cushing, Jr., M. D. 
Lawrence Fire Equipment 
Lawrence Fire Equipment 
Kenneth P. Thompson Co., Inc. 
Town Printing Company 
Workware Uniform Sales 
Sherwin-Williams Co. 
A. H. Anderson, Inc. 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Bon Secours Hospital 



Recreation 

Recreation 

Mun. Bldgs. 

Mun. Bldgs. 

Highway 

Fire 

Library 

Library 

Conservation Comm. 

Bldg. Inspector 

Police 

Mun. Bldgs. 

School 

Highway 

Police 



$ 



47.77 
47.24 
87.77 
19.65 
64.68 
93.00 
11.40 
51.45 
3.37 
79.10 
104.35 
12.94 
70.89 
92.40 
15.00 



ARTICLE 49. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the following balances be lapsed 
and returned to Surplus Revenue : 



Art. 


9, 


1965 


Art. 


5, 


1966 


Art. 


28, 


1966 


Art. 


17, 


1967 


Art. 


3, 


1968 


Art. 


13, 


1969 


Art. 


16A 


,1969 


Art. 


10, 


1970 


Art. 


12A 


,1970 


Art. 


20, 


1970 


Art. 


41, 


1970 


Art. 


2A, 


1971 


Art. 


12, 


1971 


Art. 


17A 


,1971 


Art. 


52, 


1971 


Art. 


55, 


1971 


Art. 


54, 


1971 


Total 




ARTICLE 


50. 



Establish boundaries 

Engineering, Haggetts Pond 

Sewer-Wild Rose and Holly Drives 

Tuition for employees 

High School playfields 

Sewer, Chestnut Street 

Demolition of fire station 

Road Drains 

Fire Alarm System 

High School tennis courts 

Sewer, Wild Rose Drive 

Stowe School renovation 

Vacations, Fire & Police 

Unpaid bill, 1970 

Aerial photographs 

West Andover Community Center 

Drop-In Center 



$1,717.56 

2,332.00 

177.50 

39.00 

5,890.92 

10.61 

617.71 

128.61 

833.00 

378.98 

4,885.55 

16,806.37 

5,721.00 

17.00 

900.00 

9.00 

3,976.00 

$44,440.81 



To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use 
in free cash to reduce the 1972 tax rate and to offset appropriations voted at the 
1972 Town Meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously that the Assessors be per- 
mitted to use up to $500,000 in Free Cash to reduce the 1972 tax rate and to offset 
appropriations voted at the 1972 Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the jurisdiction and 
control of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 8C as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following 
described land: 

Lot 3 of Assessors' Map #12, containing approximately 17,600 square feet 

of land, and located on Gray Road at the Andover-North Andover town boundary. 

Inserted at request of Conservation Commission. 



81 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 51 as 
printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commis- 
sion to acquire for conservation purposes under General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 
8c as amended or as hereafter further amended the fee or any lesser interest in all 
or part of Lot 21C of Assessors' Map 196, supposed to be owned by Philip C. and 
Ruth J. Pray, located on the easterly side of Haggetts Pond Road and Wood Hill Road 
in the vicinity of Haggetts Pond and containing approximately 15.47 acres, said 
purchase to be made from the Conservation Fund only upon such terms as the Board of 
Selectmen shall approve. 

Inserted at request of Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to approve Article 52 as 
printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to change from Single Residence B to 
Apartment District and to amend the Zoning District Boundaries so that the parcels 
of land belonging to ARTHUR J. POISSON, JAMES D. DOHERTY, EDWARD J. NANTOSKI and 
JOSEPH P. DOHERTY and illustrated on the Assessors Map 110, Lot 1, be included in 
the Apartment District, the same being a certain tract or parcel in said Andover, 
bounded and described as follows: — 

Beginning at a point on the Northerly side of Lowell Street in said Andover, 
within said County of Essex, at the southeasterly corner of land now or for- 
merly of Barberian which point is 29.0 feet Easterly from an Essex County 
stone bound in the northerly line of Lowell Street; thence NORTHEASTERLY 
along the Northerly line of said Lowell Street 150.73 feet to an Essex County 
stone bound; thence NORTHEASTERLY again along Northerly line of said Lowell 
Street 188.57 feet to another Essex County stone bound; thence NORTHEASTERLY 
again along the Northerly line of Lowell Street 55.43 feet to a drill hole 
in the Southwesterly corner of land now or formerly of DiSALVO: thence NORTH- 
WESTERLY 350 feet more or less to a point; thence NORTHERLY 272.00 feet to a 
point; thence NORTHERLY again 662.68 feet to an iron pin in a stone wall at 
land now or formerly of LEWIS et al ; thence WESTERLY along the aforesaid stone 
wall in various courses 712.89 feet to a drill hole; thence NORTHERLY along 
said stone wall 369.84 feet to a drill hole; thence NORTHWESTERLY in various 
courses along said stone wall 886.94 feet to an iron pin; thence NORTHWESTERLY 
again but a little more NORTHERLY 357.00 feet more or less to a point on the 
SOUTHEASTERLY corner of Lot "B" as shown on North Essex Registry of Deeds Plan 
No. 6369; thence NORTHWESTERLY again 320.81 feet by Lot "B" and Lot "A" as 
shown on said Plan No. 6369; thence SOUTHERLY 162.25 feet by Lot No. 7 to a 
point as shown on a certain plan numbered 5226 filed with North District Essex 
Registry of Deeds; thence SOUTHERLY again 691.75 feet by Lots numbered 8 to 14 
inclusive to a point as shown on a certain plan numbered 5241 filed with said 
Registry of Deeds; thence SOUTHERLY again 150.00 feet by Lot No. 43 to a point 
as shown on a certain plan numbered 6051 filed with said Registry of Deeds; 
thence SOUTHERLY 235 feet more or less to a point at land now or formerly of 
one FICKS as shown on aforesaid Plan No. 6051; thence EASTERLY 515 feet more 
or less to an iron pin in the line of a brook as shown on Plan No. 33419A 
Sheet 2 recorded in Book 1029, Page 319 of said Registry of Deeds; thence in a 
general SOUTHERLY and SOUTHEASTERLY direction along the brook 1030.00 feet more 
or less to an iron pin; thence SOUTHWESTERLY along said brook 266.90 feet to an 
iron pin; thence SOUTHEASTERLY 344.29 feet to land now or formerly of Barberian: 
thence EASTERLY along said BARBERIAN land 627.44 feet to a drill hole; thence 
SOUTHERLY 168.46 feet along said BARBERIAN land to the point of beginning. 

On petition of Marshall W. Hollis and others. 

Article 53 was withdrawn. 



82 



ARTICLE 54. To act upon the report of the TOWN OFFICERS. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the annual report of the Town Offi- 
cers as printed in the annual town report be accepted and placed on file. 

A standing ovation was given to Town Counsel Fredric S. O'Brien, Finance Committee 
Chairman Albert J. Greenberg and Planning Board Chairman Harold King, all of whom 
mil be leaving their respective positions. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel O'Brien and duly seconded, it was VOTED to ad- 
journ at 9:40 P. M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 

Elden R. Salter 
Town Clerk 



83 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 2, 1972 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, August 28, 1972, the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs, met and assembled in the 
Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet Street on Monday, the second day of October, 1972 at 
7:30 P. M. 

The meeting was called to order by Arthur Williams, Moderator at 7:40 P. M. 

The check lists were used at entrance and showed 689 voters admitted to the meet- 
ing. 

Opening prayer was offered by the Rev. Charles A. Fowlie, Minister of the United 
Church of Ballardvale. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman George Heseltine. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit fifteen non-voters to the meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the reading of the warrant 
and the return of service of the Constable be dispensed with, and that the Moderator 
refer to the articles by number. 

ESSEX, SS. October 2, 1972 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the 
Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the time and 
place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five 
other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds a sum not to exceed $500.00 to pay unpaid bills for 
which obligation was incurred in 1970 and 1971. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously to transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate $456.00 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred 
in 1970 and 1971, as follows: 

Moody's Investors Service, Inc. Library $ 415.00 

Bon Secours Hospital Police 15.00 

Herman G. Protze Spec. Art. 26.00 

$ 456.00 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate by transfer from 
available funds the sum of $15,000.00 to pay for the cost of increased insurance 
premiums on Town buildings. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 2 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $15,000 from available funds. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will reaffirm its vote taken under Article 24 at 
the Special Town Meeting of October 6, 1969 by which it accepted Dorset Circle as a 
public way. 



84 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 3 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Bylaws by deleting Section 
7 of Article XII and adopt a new section 7 to read as follows: 

Section 7. 

"No person shall fire or discharge any gun, fowling piece, pistol or other 
firearms within any street, public way, place or square in the Town except 
with the permission of the Board of Selectmen. No person shall discharge 
or fire any rifle of any caliber within the Town limits for any purpose 
except on an established range. This section does not apply to any firing 
in accordance with law except that no hunting shall be permitted with a 
rifle or any caliber", or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town amend its By-laws by strik- 
ing Section 7 of Article XII and adopt a new Section 7 to read as follows: 

No person shall discharge a firearm in the town except a law enforcement official 
in the performance of his duties. This by-law shall not restrict the discharge 
of firearms on an established firing range, nor the discharge of a firearm in 
the legal defense of persons or property, nor any discharge of a firearm which 
has been specifically authorized by the Commonwealth on state-owned property. 
A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to thank Mr. George Chongris for his 
generous gift to the Town of approximately nine acres of land located off Gray Road, 
to be held and used by the Town for conservation purposes. 

Inserted at request of Conservation Commission. 

Article 5 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the jurisdiction and con- 
trol of the Conservation Commission for all purposes included in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 8C, as it now reads or may hereafter be amended, the following 
described lands of the Town of Andover acquired by tax takings: 

1. Lot 4 of Assessors' Map 64 (Route 125). 

2. Lot 37 of Assessors' Map 74 (on Shawsheen River). 

3. Lot 2A of Assessors' Map 150 (Haggetts Pond-Fish Brook swamp area). 

4. Lot 9 of Assessors' Map 150 (abutting "Davideit" land already owned 
by Conservation Commission) . 

Inserted at request of Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 6 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. The Vote YES-388, NO-28 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the 
sum of $2,200.00 for the purchase of three (3) rescue boats and accessories, three 
(3) boat trailers, and one (1) outboard motor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that Article 7 be approved as printed in 
the warrant in the amount of $2,200 from available funds. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the 
sum of $5,000.00 for the purpose of cleaning and cement lining a six inch cast iron 
sanitary sewer serving the easterly section of Harding Street. 

Article 8 was withdrawn. 

85 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to turn over to the Andover Housing 
Authority three acres of land, more or less, comprising the old dump on High Street 
for use as low and/or middle income housing, or what it will do in regard thereto. 

Inserted at request of Andover Housing Authority. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Town Meeting authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to transfer to the Housing Authority, in such manner, and upon such 
terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may determine, the three (3) acres 
of land more or less on High Street known as the old Dump, for use as low and/or 
middle income housing provided that if any transfer is to be made under this authori- 
zation, it must be made prior to the March, 1973 Annual Town Meeting. 

The Vote — YES 414, NO 56 — voted by more than 2/3 as required. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $9,000.00 to 
be used to replace broken and defective windows at t